Retrofitting Nebraska 2018

May 31, 2018

Revised July 1, 2019

Nebraska Department of Environment and Energy logo

NED-The Energy Dude

Installation Standards for

Single Family and Manufactured Housing

created by

The Nebraska Weatherization Assistance Program


Installation Standards for Single Family and Manufactured Housing

Table of Contents
At a Glance

NeWAP Installation Standards - Field Guide

1 Inspections, Energy Audits, Deferrals and Client Education

2 Health & Safety

3 Air Sealing

4 Insulation

5 Heating and Cooling

6 Ventilation

7 Baseload

8 Definitions

Nebraska Weatherization Assistance Program Standard Work Specifications

Single Family Housing Standard Work Specifications

2 Health & Safety

3 Air Sealing

4 Insulation

5 Heating and Cooling

6 Ventilation

7 Baseload

Manufactured Housing Standard Work Specifications

MH 2 Health & Safety

MH 3 Air Sealing

MH 4 Insulation

MH 5 Heating and Cooling

MH 6 Ventilation


Installation Standards for Single Family and Manufactured Housing

Table of Contents

Nebraska Weatherization Assistance Program Installation Standards - Field Guide

1 Inspections, Energy Audits, Deferrals and Client Education

1.01 Inspections

1.0101 Initial On-Site Inspection

1.0102 Pre-Implementation Inspection

1.0103 Quality Control Inspections

1.02 Energy Audit

1.03 Deferrals

1.04 Client Education

1.0401 Heating and Cooling Saving Suggestions:

1.0402 Hot Water and Laundry Saving Suggestions:

1.0403 Other Energy Saving Opportunities:

1.0404 Health & Safety Educational Material

2 Health & Safety

2.01 Universal Safe Work Practices

2.0100 Safe Work Practices

2.0100.1 Global Worker Safety

2.0101 Air Sealing

2.0102 Insulation

2.0103 Heating and Cooling Equipment

2.0105 Baseload

2.0106 Material Safety

2.0107 Basements and Crawl Spaces

2.02 Heating System Guidance

2.0201 Budget Category Determination

2.0202 Code Compliance and Heating System Inspection Requirements

2.0202.1 Code Compliance

2.0202.2 Inspection Requirements

2.0203 Electric Space Heaters

2.0204 Fireplaces - Special Considerations

2.0205 Manufactured Homes - Special Considerations

2.0206 Masonry Chimneys

2.0207 Solid-Fuel Space Heaters

2.0208 Unvented Gas- and Liquid-Fueled Space Heaters

2.0209 Vented Gas- and Liquid-Fueled Space Heaters

2.03 Carbon Monoxide Testing, Inspection, Verification, and Documentation

2.04 System Safety Testing, Inspection, Verification, and Documentation

2.0401 Combustion Appliance Testing

2.0402 Leak Testing Gas Appliances and Piping

2.0403 Verify the BTU Input on Natural Gas Appliances by Clocking (timing) the Gas Meter

2.0404 Complete Initial Inspection of the Heating System

2.0405 Verify, Assess and Document Adequate Combustion Air Supply for All Combustion Zones

2.0406 Complete Combustion Appliance Zone ( CAZ ) Testing

2.0407 Inspecting and Testing Gas Ranges and Ovens

2.0408 Inspecting and Testing Vented Appliances

2.07 Occupant Education and Access

2.0701 Basements and Crawl Spaces

2.08 DOE Health & Safety Program Guidance Requirements

2.0801 Air Conditioning and Heating Systems/Units

Asbestos

2.0802 Asbestos - in Siding, Walls, Ceilings, Etc.

2.0803 Asbestos in Vermiculite

2.0804 Asbestos on Pipes, Furnaces, other Small Covered Surfaces

2.0805 Biological and Unsanitary Conditions - Odors, Bacteria, Viruses, Raw Sewage, Rotting Wood, etc.

2.0806 Building Structure and Roofing

2.0807 Code Compliance

2.0808 Combustion Gases

2.0809 Electrical

2.0810 Formaldehyde, Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), and other Air Pollutants

2.0811 Fuel Leaks

2.0812 Gas Ovens/Stovetops/Ranges

2.0813 Hazardous Materials Disposal - Refrigerant, Asbestos, Lead, Mercury, including CFLs/Fluorescents

2.0814 Injury Prevention of Occupants and Weatherization Workers - Repairing Stairs, Replacing Handrails, etc.

2.0815 Lead Based Paint

2.0816 Mold and Moisture - Including but not limited to: gutters, down spouts, extensions, flashing, leaking roofs, vapor retarders, moisture barriers, etc.

2.0817 Occupant Pre-Existing or Potential Health Conditions

2.0818 Pests

2.0819 Radon

2.0820 Safety Devices: Smoke, Carbon Monoxide Detectors, Fire Extinguishers

2.0821 Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality

2.0822 Window and Door Replacement, Window Guards

2.0823 Worker Safety

3 Air Sealing

3.01 Identify the Air and Thermal Boundaries of the Building Envelope

3.02 Blower Door Testing

3.03 Primary Air Sealing Guidelines/Requirements

3.04 Secondary Air Sealing Guidelines/Requirements

3.05 Minor Air Sealing Requirements

3.06 Air Sealing Exceptions

3.12 Windows and Doors

3.1201 Maintenance, Repair, and Sealing

3.1202 Window and Door Repairing/Replacing Cracked and Broken Glass

3.1203 Window and Door Replacement Requirements

3.13 Floors

3.14 Basements and Crawl Spaces

3.1401 Basements Connected to Crawl Spaces or Ledged Basements

3.1402 Crawl Spaces

3.1488 Special Considerations

3.16 Ducts

3.1601 Duct Preparation

3.1602 Duct Sealing

3.17 Additions

4 Insulation

4.10 Attics

4.1001 General Preparation

4.1003 Attic Ceilings

4.1004 Knee Walls

4.1005 Attic Floors

4.1006 Attic Openings

4.1088 Special Considerations

4.11 Walls

4.1101 Preparation

4.1102 Accessible Walls

4.1103 Enclosed Walls

4.1104 Manufactured Housing Walls

4.13 Floors

4.1301 Accessible Floors

4.1303 Manufactured Housing Floor Cavity Insulation

4.14 Basements and Crawl Spaces

4.1401 Band/Rim Joists

4.1402 Basements and Crawl Space Walls

4.16 Ducts

4.1601 Insulating Ducts

5 Heating and Cooling

5.30 Forced Air

5.3001 Design and Replacement

5.3003 System Assessment/Inspection and Maintenance

5.31 Hydronic Heating (Hot Water and Steam)

5.3101 Design

5.3104 Equipment Maintenance, Testing, and Repair

6 Ventilation

6.60 Exhaust

6.6002 Components

6.6003 Fans

6.6005 Appliance Exhaust Vents

6.61 Supply

6.6102 Components

6.6188 Special Considerations

6.62 Whole Building Ventilation

6.6201 Air Flow Requirements

6.6202 Components

6.6205 Exhaust-Only Strategies for Manufactured Housing System

6.6288 Special Considerations

6.99 Additional Resources

6.9901 Codes and Standards Resources

7 Baseload

7.80 Plug Load

7.8001 Refrigerators

7.8001.1 Refrigerator Replacement Inspection and Audit Requirements

7.8001.2 Refrigerator Replacement Requirements

7.8001.3 Installation, Client Education and Client File Documentation Requirements

7.8003 Lighting

7.81 Water Heating

7.8101 Water Use Reduction

7.8102 Water Heater Installation and Replacement Requirements

7.8103 Water Heater Maintenance / Inspection / Repair Requirements

7.8104 Water Heating Distribution System Requirements

8 Definitions

Nebraska Weatherization Assistance Program Standard Work Specifications

Single Family Housing Standard Work Specifications

2 Health & Safety

2.01 Safe Work Practices

2.0100 Safe Work Practices

2.0100.1 Global Worker Safety

2.0100.1b - Hand protection

2.0100.1c - Respiratory protection

2.0100.1d - Electrical Safety

2.0100.1e - Carbon monoxide (CO)

2.0100.1f - Protective clothing

2.0100.1g - Confined space safety

2.0100.1h - Power tool safety

2.0100.1i - Chemical safety

2.0100.1j - Ergonomic safety

2.0100.1k - Hand tool safety

2.0100.1l - Slips, trips, and falls

2.0100.1m - Thermal stress

2.0100.1n - Fire Safety

2.0100.1o - Asbestos-containing materials (ACM)

2.0100.1p - Lead paint assessment

2.0100.1r - Crawl space safety

2.0101 Air Sealing

2.0101.1 Air Sealing Worker Safety

2.0101.1a - Worker safety

2.0101.1b - Moisture precautions for crawl spaces and basements

2.0101.1c - Moisture precautions: living space

2.0101.1d - Moisture precautions for exterior water

2.0102 Insulation

2.0102.1 Insulation Worker Safety

2.0102.1a - Worker safety

2.0102.1b - Asbestos-containing materials (ACM)

2.0102.1c - Materials

2.0102.1d - Lead paint assessment

2.0103 Heating and Cooling Equipment

2.0103.1 Combustion Worker Safety

2.0103.1a - Worker safety

2.0103.1b - Carbon monoxide (CO)

2.0103.1c - Raw fuel

2.0103.2 Heating and Cooling Worker Safety

2.0103.2a - Worker safety

2.0103.2b - Mercury

2.0103.2c - Asbestos

2.0103.2d - Personal protective equipment (PPE)

2.0103.2e - Combustible gas detection

2.0103.2f - Carbon monoxide

2.0103.2g - Sealant

2.0103.2h - Safety devices

2.0104 Ventilation Equipment

2.0104.1 Ventilation Worker Safety

2.0104.1a - Worker safety

2.0105 Baseload

2.0105.1 Baseload Worker Safety

2.0105.1a - Worker safety

2.0106 Material Safety

2.0106.1 Material Selection, Labeling, and Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs)

2.0106.1a - Material selection

2.0106.1b - Material labels

2.0106.1c - Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs)

2.0107 Basements and Crawl Spaces

2.0107.1 Basements and Crawl Spaces Worker Safety

2.0107.1a - Worker safety

2.0107.2 Crawl Spaces - Pre-Work Qualifications

2.0107.2a - Fuel leaks

2.0107.2b - Electrical hazards

2.0107.2c - Mold

2.0107.2d - Plumbing and water leaks

2.0107.2e - Pest and termite work

2.0107.2f - Structural repairs, modifications

2.0107.2g - Appliance and heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system repairs and change outs

2.0107.3 Crawl Spaces - Debris removal

2.0107.3a - Debris removal

2.0107.3b - Debris disposal

2.0107.4 Negative Pressure Contamination Control

2.0107.4a - Pressure

2.02 Combustion Safety

2.0201 Combustion Safety Testing - General

2.0201.1 Combustion Appliance Zone ( CAZ ) Testing

2.0201.1a - Assessment

2.0201.1b - Fuel leak detection

2.0201.1c - Venting

2.0201.1d - Base pressure test

2.0201.1e - Depressurization test

2.0201.2 Combustion Safety - Make-up Air

2.0201.2a - Outside combustion make-up air

2.0201.2b - New appliances

2.0201.2c - CO detection and warning equipment

2.0201.2d - Gas ovens - Approved Variance

2.0201.2e - Gas range burners

2.0201.2f - Solid fuel burning appliances

2.0202 Unvented Space Heaters

2.0202.1 Unvented Space Heaters: Propane, Natural Gas, and Kerosene Heaters

2.0202.1a - Removal

2.0202.1b - Occupant education

2.0203 Vented Gas Appliances

2.0203.1 Combustion Air for Natural Draft Appliances

2.0203.1a - Required combustion air

2.0203.1b - Additional combustion air (if action is required)

2.0203.1c - Spillage testing

2.0203.2 Combustion Flue Gas - Orphaned Water Heaters

2.0203.2a - Spillage testing

2.0203.2b - Flue gas removal (chimney liner) - Approved Variance

2.0203.2c - Retesting spillage

2.0203.2d - Required combustion air

2.0203.2e - Additional combustion air (if action is required)

2.03 Safety Devices

2.0301 Combustion Safety Devices

2.0301.1 Smoke Alarm

2.0301.1b - Smoke alarm (battery operated)

2.0301.2 Carbon Monoxide Alarm or Monitor

2.0301.2a - CO detection and warning equipment (hardwired)

2.0301.2b - CO detection and warning equipment (battery operated)

2.04 Moisture

2.0401 Air Sealing

2.0401.1 Air Sealing Moisture Precautions

2.0401.1a - Moisture precautions for attics

2.0401.1b - Moisture precautions for crawl spaces

2.0401.1c - Moisture precautions for the living space

2.0403 Vapor Barriers

2.0403.1 Vented Crawl Spaces - Ground Moisture Barrier

2.0403.1a - Material integrity

2.0403.1b - Coverage

2.0403.1c - Material specification

2.0403.1d - Overlap seams

2.0403.1e - Fastening

2.0403.2 Closed Crawl Spaces - Ground Moisture Barriers

2.0403.2a - Material integrity

2.0403.2b - Coverage

2.0403.2c - Material specification

2.0403.2d - Overlap seams

2.0403.2e - Fastening

2.0403.2f - Sealing seams

2.06 Electrical

2.0601 Knob and Tube Wiring

2.0601.1 Knob and Tube Wiring

2.0601.1a - Knob and tube identification

2.0601.1b - Live wire testing

2.0601.1c - Isolation and protection - Approved Variance

2.0601.1d - Replacement

2.0602 Electrical Hazards

2.0602.1 Static electric shock

2.0602.1a - Rigid fill tube

2.0602.1b - Metal coupler grounding

2.07 Occupant Education and Access

2.0701 Basements and Crawl Spaces

2.0701.1 Crawl Spaces - Providing Access

2.0701.1a - Access

2.0701.1b - Security

2.0701.2 Crawl Space Information Sign

2.0701.2a - Sign specifications

2.0701.2b - Sign content

2.0701.2c - Hazard warning

2.0701.3 Crawl Space-Occupant Education

2.0701.3a - Written communication

2.0701.3b - Oral communication

2.0701.3c - Contact information

2.0702 Installed Equipment

2.0702.1 Warranty and Service Agreement

2.0702.1a - Warranty

2.0702.1b - Warranty and maintenance agreement - Client education

2.0702.1c - General conditions

3 Air Sealing

3.10 Attics

3.1001 Penetrations and Chases

3.1001.1 Penetrations and Chases

3.1001.1a - Pre-inspection

3.1001.1b - Backing and infill

3.1001.1c - Sealant selection

3.1001.1d - High temperature application

3.1001.2 Chase Capping

3.1001.2a - Pre-inspection of chases

3.1001.2b - Standard chase (interior walls covered with drywall or plaster)

3.1001.2c - Non-standard chase (interior walls covered with wood or paneling)

3.1001.2d - Support

3.1001.2e - Joint seal

3.1001.2f - Adjacent framing

3.1001.3 Walls Open to Attic-Balloon Framing and Double Walls

3.1001.3a - Pre-inspection

3.1001.3b - Sealing methods

3.1001.3c - Support

3.1001.3d - Joint seal

3.1001.3e - Adjacent framing

3.1002 Open Stairwells

3.1002.1 Interior with Sloped Ceiling

3.1002.1a - Pre-inspection

3.1002.1b - Standard void over stairwell (15-minute fire-rated material; e.g., gypsum lined)

3.1002.1c - Non-standard void over stairwell (surfaces around void are not 15-minute fire-rated (e.g., bookcases, chest of drawers), or lined with paneling

3.1002.1d - Support

3.1002.1e - Joint seal

3.1002.1f - Perimeter sealing

3.1002.2 Stairwell to Attic-Door at Bottom with No Ceiling Above

3.1002.2a - Pre-inspection

3.1002.2b - Option 1: Bring stairwell inside

3.1002.2c - Option 2: Keep stairwell outside

3.1002.2d - Support

3.1002.2e - Joint seal

3.1002.2f - Perimeter sealing

3.1002.3 Stairwell to Attic-Door at Top with Finished Ceiling Above

3.1002.3a - Pre-inspection

3.1002.3b - Option 1: Bring stairwell inside

3.1002.3c - Support

3.1002.3d - Joint seal

3.1002.3e - Perimeter sealing

3.1003 Dropped Ceilings and Soffits

3.1003.1 New Ceiling Below Original - Old Ceiling Intact or Repairable

3.1003.1a - Pre-inspection

3.1003.1b - Sealing methods

3.1003.1c - Support

3.1003.1d - Joint seal

3.1003.1e - Adjacent framing

3.1003.2 Ceiling Leaks Not Repairable - No Air Barrier Above

3.1003.2a - Pre-inspection

3.1003.2b - Sealing methods

3.1003.2c - Support

3.1003.2d - Joint seal

3.1003.2e - Adjacent framing

3.1003.3 Above Closets and Tubs

3.1003.3a - Pre-inspection

3.1003.3b - Above closets and tubs

3.1003.3c - Support

3.1003.3d - Joint seal

3.1003.3e - Adjacent framing

3.1003.4 Dropped Ceilings

3.1003.4a - Pre-inspection

3.1003.4b - Sealing methods

3.1003.4c - Support

3.1003.4d - Joint seal

3.1003.4e - Adjacent framing

3.1003.5 Dropped Ceiling with Light Boxes and Fixtures

3.1003.5a - Pre-inspection

3.1003.5b - Light boxes (e.g., fluorescent lights)

3.1003.5c - Non-insulation contact (IC) rated recessed lights

3.1003.6 Dropped Soffits

3.1003.6a - Pre-inspection

3.1003.6b - Soffit general

3.1003.6c - Option 1: Bring soffit inside (seal at top)

3.1003.6d - Option 2: Leave soffit outside (seal at bottom or side)

3.1003.6e - Soffits containing non-IC rated recessed lights

3.1004 Cathedralized Attic Ceilings

3.1004.1 Cathedralized Attic Air Sealing (Insulation Installed at Roof Deck)

3.1004.1a - Pre-inspection

3.1004.1b - Backing and infill

3.1004.1c - Sealant selection

3.1005 Other Ceiling Materials

3.1005.1 Tongue and Groove Ceilings

3.1005.1a - Pre-inspection

3.1005.1b - Backing

3.1005.1c - Sealant selection

3.12 Windows and Doors

3.1201 Maintenance, Repair, and Sealing

3.1201.1 Double-Hung Wood Windows

3.1201.1a - Lead paint assessment

3.1201.1b - Weather-stripping

3.1201.1c - Sash locks

3.1201.1d - Replacement sills

3.1201.1e - Sash replacement

3.1201.1f - Adjust stops

3.1201.1g - Replace stops

3.1201.2 Single-Unit Window and Fixed Frame with Wood Sash

3.1201.2a - Lead paint assessment

3.1201.2b - Operable windows

3.1201.2c - Air infiltration

3.1201.2d - Water infiltration

3.1201.2e - Occupant education and maintenance

3.1201.3 Exterior Doors

3.1201.3a - Lead paint assessment

3.1201.3b - Door operation and fit

3.1201.3c - Air infiltration

3.1201.3d - Water infiltration

3.1201.3e - Occupant education and maintenance

3.1201.4 Pocket Door

3.1201.4a - Backing and infill

3.1201.4b - Sealant selection

3.1202 Repairing/Replacing Cracked and Broken Glass

3.1202.1 Fixed Frame with Wood Sash - Older House

3.1202.1a - Lead paint assessment

3.1202.1b - Broken glass removal

3.1202.1c - Sash preparation

3.1202.1d - New glass installation

3.1202.2 Single-Unit Window, Mounted on Rough Opening - Newer House

3.1202.2a - Lead paint assessment

3.1202.2b - Broken glass removal

3.1202.2c - Opening preparation

3.1202.2d - New glass installation

3.1203 Replacement

3.1203.1 Replacement Window in Existing Window Frame

3.1203.1a - Lead paint assessment

3.1203.1b - Opening preparation for replacement window in existing window frame

3.1203.1c - Replacement window installation

3.1203.1d - Safety

3.1203.1e - Occupant education and maintenance

3.1203.2 Single-Unit Window, Mounted on Rough Opening - Newer House

3.1203.2a - Lead paint assessment

3.1203.2b - Opening preparation

3.1203.2c - Replacement unit preparation

3.1203.2d - Replacement Window Installation

3.1203.2e - Safety

3.1203.2f - Occupant education and maintenance

3.14 Basements and Crawl Spaces

3.1401 Basements Connected to Crawl Spaces

3.1401.1 Basements Connected to Crawl Spaces - Sealing and Insulating

3.1401.1a - Conditioned basements with vented crawl spaces

3.1401.1b - Conditioned basements with closed crawl spaces

3.1401.1c - Unconditioned basements with vented crawl spaces

3.1401.1d - Unconditioned basements with closed crawl spaces

3.1402 Crawl Spaces

3.1402.1 Crawl Spaces - Sealing Floor Penetrations

3.1402.1a - Backing and infill

3.1402.1b - Sealant selection

3.1402.1c - High temperature application

3.1402.2 Closed Crawl Spaces - Air Sealing Foundation Vents

3.1402.2a - Vent closure - Approved Variance

3.1402.3 Closed Crawl Spaces - Air Sealing Exterior Wall

3.1402.3a - Seal penetrations

3.1402.3b - Pest exclusion

3.1402.4 Closed Crawl Spaces - Air Sealing Brick Curtain Wall with Piers

3.1402.4a - Seal penetrations - Approved Variance

3.1402.4b - Pest exclusion

3.1402.5 Closed Crawl Spaces - Attached Crawl Spaces Under Unconditioned Spaces

3.1402.5a - Separate crawl spaces

3.1402.5b - Entry point

3.1488 Special Considerations

3.1488.1 Skirting Post and Pier Foundations

3.1488.1a - Skirting

3.1488.1b - Flashing

3.1488.1c - Fastening

3.15 Attached Garages

3.1501 Garage Openings

3.1501.1 Penetrations, Cracks, and Doors Between Garage and House

3.1501.1a - Penetrations

3.1501.1b - Ductwork

3.1501.1c - Cracks

3.1501.1d - Garage to house door

3.1501.1e - Glass

3.1501.1f - Carbon monoxide (CO) alarm.

3.1501.1g - Occupant education

3.16 Ducts

3.1601 Duct Preparation

3.1601.1 Preparation and Mechanical Fastening

3.1601.1a - Preparation

3.1601.1b - Metal to metal

3.1601.1c - Flex to metal

3.1601.1d - Duct board to duct board

3.1601.1e - Flexible duct to duct board

3.1601.1f - Metal plenum to air handler cabinet

3.1601.1g - Duct board plenum to air handler cabinet

3.1601.1h - Boot to wood

3.1601.1i - Boot to gypsum

3.1601.1j - Flex to duct board

3.1601.2 Duct Preparation for SPF Application

3.1601.2a - Inspection

3.1601.2b - Repair

3.1601.3 Support

3.1601.3a - Support (applies to all duct types)

3.1602 Duct Sealing

3.1602.1 Air Sealing Duct System

3.1602.1a - New component to new component sealant selection

3.1602.1b - New component to existing component

3.1602.1c - Existing component to existing component

3.1602.2 Duct Spray Polyurethane Foam (SPF) Installation

3.1602.2a - Installation

3.1602.4 Air Sealing System Components

3.1602.4a - Duct boot to interior surface

3.1602.4b - Wood plenums and building cavities - air sealing

3.1602.4c - Air handler cabinet

3.1602.4d - Filter slot

3.1602.5 Return - Framed Platform

3.1602.5a - Preparation

3.1602.5b - Infill and backing

3.1602.5c - Sealant selection

3.1602.7 Return and Supply Plenums in Basements and Crawl Spaces

3.1602.7a - Supply plenums (includes conditioned crawl spaces)

3.1602.7b - Return plenums

4 Insulation

4.10 Attics

4.1001 General Preparation

4.1001.1 Non-Insulation Contact (IC) Recessed Light

4.1001.1a - Air barrier system

4.1001.1b - Enclosure top

4.1001.1c - Clearance

4.1001.1d - Sealants and weather-stripping

4.1001.2 Knob and Tube Wiring

4.1001.2a - Identifying knob and tube wiring

4.1001.2b - Testing to determine if live

4.1001.2c - Isolate or replace - Approved Variance

4.1001.3 Fireplace Chimney and Combustion Flue Vents

4.1001.3a - Verify attic prep

4.1001.3b - Required clearance

4.1001.3c - Safety

4.1001.3d - Occupant education

4.1001.4 Vented Eave or Soffit Baffles

4.1001.4a - Installation

4.1001.5 Dense Pack Preparation

4.1001.5a - Preparation

4.1001.6 Unvented Roof Deck - Preparation for Spray Polyurethane Foam

4.1001.6a - Surface preparation

4.1001.6b - Installation of insulation dams

4.1001.6c - Elimination of insulation dams

4.1001.6d - Removal of existing insulation and vapor retarder

4.1001.7 Vented Roof Deck - Preparation for SPF

4.1001.7a - Surface preparation

4.1001.7b - Installation of vent chutes

4.1001.7c - Installation of insulation dams

4.1001.7d - Removal of existing insulation and vapor retarder

4.1003 Attic Ceilings

4.1003.1 Pitched/Vaulted/Cathedralized Ceilings - Loose Fill Over

4.1003.1a - Ventilation

4.1003.1b - Lighting

4.1003.1c - Installation

4.1003.1d - Occupant education

4.1003.2 Pitched/Vaulted/Cathedralized Ceilings - Dense Pack Over

4.1003.2a - Fill slant ceilings

4.1003.2b - Onsite documentation

4.1003.3 Unvented Flat roof with Existing Insulation

4.1003.3a - Ventilation

4.1003.3b - Installation

4.1003.3c - Occupant education

4.1003.4 Cape Cod Side Attic Roof - Dense Pack Installation

4.1003.4b - Netting, fabric rigid sheathing

4.1003.4c - Installation

4.1003.4d - Onsite documentation

4.1003.4e - Occupant education

4.1003.5 Unvented Roof Deck - Spray Polyurethane Foam Installation

4.1003.5a - Installation

4.1003.5b - Onsite documentation

4.1003.5c - Occupant education

4.1003.6 Vented Roof Deck - Spray Polyurethane Foam Installation

4.1003.6a - Installation

4.1003.6b - Onsite documentation

4.1003.6c - Occupant education

4.1003.7 Ignition and Thermal Barriers - Spray Urethane Foam

4.1003.7a – Identify fire safety requirements

4.1003.7b – Installation of ignition barrier

4.1003.7c – Installation of thermal barrier

4.1003.7d – Occupant education

4.1004 Knee Walls

4.1004.1 Preparation for Dense Packing

4.1004.1a - Backing

4.1004.1b - Installation

4.1004.2 Preparation for Batt Insulation

4.1004.2a - Knee wall prep for batts

4.1004.2b - Installation

4.1004.2c - Backing knee wall

4.1004.3 Strapping for Existing Insulation

4.1004.3a - Sealing

4.1004.3b - Installation

4.1004.3c - Attachment

4.1004.3d - Occupant education

4.1004.4 Knee Wall Without Framing

4.1004.4a - Sealing

4.1004.4b - Flat cavity present

4.1004.4c - Installation

4.1004.4d - Occupant education

4.1004.5 Knee Walls and Gable End Walls - Preparation for and Installation of Spray Polyurethane Foam (SPF)

4.1004.5a - Installation of backing

4.1004.5b - Installation

4.1004.5c - Onsite documentation

4.1005 Attic Floors

4.1005.1 Accessible Floors - Batt Installation

4.1005.1a - Preparation

4.1005.1b - Installation

4.1005.1c - Occupant education

4.1005.2 Accessible Floors - Loose Fill Installation

4.1005.2a - Preparation

4.1005.2b - Air barrier

4.1005.2c - Installation

4.1005.2d - Onsite documentation

4.1005.2e - Occupant education

4.1005.3 Accessible Floors - Batt Insulation Over Existing Insulation

4.1005.3a - Preparation

4.1005.3b - Installation

4.1005.3c - Insulation

4.1005.3d - Safety

4.1005.3e - Onsite documentation

4.1005.4 Accessible Floors - Loose Fill Over Existing Insulation

4.1005.4a - Preparation

4.1005.4b - Installation

4.1005.4c - Safety

4.1005.4d - Onsite documenation

4.1005.5 Enclosed Bonus room Floor Over Unconditioned Space - Dense Pack Installation

4.1005.5a - Air barrier

4.1005.5b - Fill floors

4.1005.5c - Safety

4.1005.5d - Onsite documentation

4.1005.6 Enclosed Attic Storage Platform Floor - Dense Pack Installation

4.1005.6a - Fill floors

4.1005.6b - Safety

4.1005.6c - Onsite documentation

4.1005.6d - Occupant education

4.1005.7 Attic Floor - Preparation and Installation of Spray Polyurethane Foam (SPF)

4.1005.7a - Preparation

4.1005.7b - Installation

4.1005.7c - Safety

4.1005.7d - Onsite documentation

4.1005.7e - Occupant education

4.1006 Attic Openings

4.1006.1 Pull-Down Stairs

4.1006.1a - Installation

4.1006.1b - Sealing

4.1006.1c - Durability

4.1006.1d - Onsite documentation

4.1006.2 Access Doors and Hatches

4.1006.2a - Installation

4.1006.2b - Sealing

4.1006.2c - Attachment

4.1006.2e - Onsite documentation

4.1006.3 Whole-House Fan

4.1006.3a - Installation

4.1006.3b - Air sealing

4.1006.3c -Attachment

4.1006.3d - Durability

4.1006.3e - Occupant education

4.1088 Special Considerations

4.1088.1 Attic Ventilation

4.1088.1a - Air barrier and thermal boundary

4.1088.1b - Vent type

4.1088.1c - Vent location

4.1088.1d - Ventilation baffling

4.1088.1e - Ventilation screens

4.1088.3 Skylights

4.1088.3a - Sealing

4.1088.3b - Installation of skylight insulation in attics

4.1088.3c - Occupant education

4.11 Walls

4.1101 Preparation

4.1101.1 Exterior Wall Dense Packing

4.1101.1a - Preparation

4.1101.1b - Exterior dense pack

4.1102 Accessible Walls

4.1102.1 Open-Cavity Wall Insulation - General

4.1102.1a - Sealing

4.1102.1b - Installation

4.1102.1c - Pre-drywall verification

4.1102.1d - Onsite documentation

4.1102.2 Open-Cavity Wall - Spray Polyurethane Foam (SPF) Installation

4.1102.2a - Installation

4.1102.2b - Vapor retarders

4.1102.2c - Fire protection - Approved Variance

4.1102.2d - Onsite documentation

4.1103 Enclosed Walls

4.1103.1 Dense Pack Exterior Walls

4.1103.1a - Exterior dense pack - Approved Variance

4.1103.1b - Onsite documentation

4.1103.2 Additional Exterior Wall Cavities

4.1103.2a - Location of cavities

4.1103.2b - Sealing

4.1103.2c - Dense packing

4.1103.2d - Quality assurance

4.1103.2e - Close holes - Approved Variance

4.1103.2f - Onsite documentation

4.13 Floors

4.1301 Accessible Floors

4.1301.1 Standard Floor System - Batt Installation

4.1301.1a - Sealing

4.1301.1b - Installation

4.1301.1c - Securing batts

4.1301.1d - Occupant education

4.1301.2 Standard Floor System - Loose Fill with Netting

4.1301.2a - Sealing

4.1301.2b - Netting, fabric

4.1301.2c - Installation

4.1301.2d - Occupant education

4.1301.3 Standard Floor System - Loose Fill with Rigid Barrier

4.1301.3a - Sealing

4.1301.3b - Rigid air barrier

4.1301.3c - Installation

4.1301.3d - Occupant education

4.1301.4 Dense Pack Floor System with Rigid Barrier

4.1301.4a - Sealing

4.1301.4b - Rigid air barrier

4.1301.4c - Installation

4.1301.4d - Occupant education

4.1301.5 Cantilevered Floor - Batt Installation

4.1301.5a - Air Barrier for Accessible Cantilevered Floor - Batt Installation

4.1301.5b - Installation

4.1301.5c - Attachment

4.1301.5d - Exterior Soffit

4.1301.5e - Occupant education

4.1301.6 Pier Construction Subfloor Insulation - Batt Installation with Rigid Barrier

4.1301.6a - Subfloor preparation

4.1301.6b - Installation

4.1301.6c - Secure batts

4.1301.6d - Rigid air barrier

4.1301.6e - Occupant education

4.1301.7 Pier Construction Subfloor Insulation - Loose Fill with Rigid Barrier

4.1301.7a - Subfloor preparation

4.1301.7b - Rigid air barrier

4.1301.7c - Installation

4.1301.7d - Occupant education

4.1301.8 Pier Construction Subfloor Installation - Dense Pack with Rigid Barrier

4.1301.8a - Subfloor preparation

4.1301.8b - Rigid air barrier

4.1301.8c - Installation

4.1301.8d - Occupant education

4.1301.9 Open Floors Over Unconditioned Space and Cantilevered Floors, Floors Over Garages, Floors Over Unconditioned Crawl Spaces - Spray Polyurethane

4.1301.9a - Preparation

4.1301.9b - Installation

4.1301.9c - Fire protection

4.1301.9d - Onsite documentation

4.14 Basements and Crawl Spaces

4.1401 Band/Rim Joists

4.1401.1 Band/Rim Joists - Spray Polyurethane Foam (SPF) Installation

4.1401.1a - Preparation

4.1401.1b - Installation

4.1401.1c - Fire protection

4.1401.1d - Onsite documentation

4.1401.2 Band/Rim Joists - Insulation other than Spray Polyurethane Foam

4.1401.2a - Preparation

4.1401.2b - Insulation installation

4.1401.2c - Onsite documentation

4.1402 Basements and Crawl Space Walls

4.1402.1 Closed Crawl Spaces - Wall Insulation

4.1402.1a - Insulation selection

4.1402.1b - R-value

4.1402.1c - Termite inspection gap

4.1402.1d - Attachment

4.1402.1g - Onsite documentation

4.1402.2 Basement Wall Insulation - No Groundwater Leakage

4.1402.2a - R-value

4.1402.2b - Air barrier

4.1402.2c - Vapor permeability

4.16 Ducts

4.1601 Insulating Ducts

4.1601.2 Insulating Metal Ducts

4.1601.2a - Selection of duct insulation material

4.1601.2b - Duct sealing

4.1601.2c - Attachment of duct insulation

4.1601.2d - Taping of the duct insulation

4.99 Insulation - Additional Resources

4.9901 Materials

4.9901.1 General Information on Spray Polyurethane Foam (SPF)

4.9901.1a - Low-Pressure SPF

4.9901.1b - High-Pressure SPF

4.9901.1c - Manufacturer Installation Instructions

5 Heating and Cooling

5.30 Forced Air

5.3001 Design

5.3001.1 Load Calculation and Equipment Selection

5.3001.1a - Load calculation - Approved Variance

5.3001.1b - Equipment selection

5.3001.1c - Air filtration

5.3001.2 Ductwork and Termination Design

5.3001.2a - Duct design

5.3001.2b - Termination design

5.3001.2c - Air filtration

5.3002 Site Preparation

5.3002.1 Preparation for New Equipment

5.3002.1a - Access

5.3002.1b - Utility disconnect

5.3002.1c - Refigerant recovery

5.3002.1d - Equipment disconnection

5.3002.1e - Removal

5.3003 System Assessment and Maintenance

5.3003.1 Data Plate Verification

5.3003.1a - Data plate verification

5.3003.2 Combustion Analysis of Oil-Fired Appliances

5.3003.2a - Oil system: filter

5.3003.2b - Nozzle

5.3003.2c - Fuel Pressure

5.3003.2d - Place appliance in operation

5.3003.2e - Smoke test

5.3003.2f - Steady state efficiency (SSE)

5.3003.2g - Net stack temperature

5.3003.2h - Carbon dioxide (CO2) and oxygen (O2)

5.3003.2i - Excess combustion air

5.3003.2j - CO in flue gas

5.3003.2k - Testing/inspection holes

5.3003.3 Evaluating Air Flow

5.3003.3a - Total air flow

5.3003.3b - External static pressure

5.3003.3c - Pressure

5.3003.3d - Filter Inspection

5.3003.3e - Balancing room flow: new ductwork

5.3003.3f - Supply and return temperature measurements

5.3003.3g - Return web bulb and dry bulb

5.3003.3h - Temperature rise: gas and oil furnaces only

5.3003.4 Evaluating Electrical Service

5.3003.4a - Polarity

5.3003.4b - Voltage/amperage: incoming power

5.3003.4c - Voltage: contactor

5.3003.4d - Grounding

5.3003.4e - Blower amperage

5.3003.4f - Compressor amperage

5.3003.4g - Door switch operation

5.3003.4h - Heat pump: emergency heat

5.3003.5 Refrigerant Line Inspection

5.3003.5a - Insulation

5.3003.5b - Ultraviolet (UV) protection of insulation

5.3003.5c - Sizing

5.3003.5d - Installation quality

5.3003.5e - Support

5.3003.7 Occupant Education

5.3003.7a - Basic operation

5.3003.7b - System controls (e.g., thermostat, humidistat)

5.3003.7c - System disconnects

5.3003.7d - Combustion air inlets

5.3003.7e - Blocking air flow

5.3003.7f - routine maintenance

5.3003.7g - Calling heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) contractor

5.3003.7h - Carbon monoxide (CO)

5.3003.7i - Warranty and service

5.3003.9 Heating and Cooling Controls

5.3003.9a - Removal of mercury-based thermostats

5.3003.9b - Removal of existing controls

5.3003.9c - Penetrations

5.3003.9d - Thermostat location

5.3003.9e - Blower speed

5.3003.9f - Thermostat selection: heat pump

5.3003.9g - Heat pump: supplementary heat

5.3003.9h - Heat pump: low ambient compressor lockout

5.3003.9i - Heat pump: outside air sensor

5.3003.9j - Heat pump: supplementary heat wiring

5.3003.9k - Thermostat: installer programming

5.3003.9l - Time delay settings

5.3003.9n - Occupant education

5.3003.10 Condensate Drainage of Heating and Air Conditioning Equipment

5.3003.10a - Connection

5.3003.10b - Insulation

5.3003.10c - Overflow protection: upflow

5.3003.10d - Pumps

5.3003.10e - Vents and traps

5.3003.10f - Drain pan

5.3003.10g - Float switch

5.3003.10h - Termination

5.3003.14 Combustion Analysis of Gas-Fired Appliances (LP and Natural Gas)

5.3003.14a - Gas Pressure - Approved Variance

5.3003.14b - Place appliance in operation

5.3003.14c - Carbon dioxide (CO2) and oxygen (O2)

5.3003.14d - Carbon monoxide (CO) in flue gas

5.3003.14e - Testing/inspection holes

5.31 Hydronic Heating (Hot Water and Steam)

5.3101 Design

5.3101.1 Heat Load Calculation - Whole House

5.3101.1a - Heating load calculation

5.3101.1b - Equipment selection

5.3101.2 Space Load Calculation - Heat Emitter Sizing

5.3101.2a - Space load calculation

5.3104 Equipment Maintenance, Testing, and Repair

5.3104.1 Controls - Thermostat replacement

5.3104.1a - Visual inspection

5.3104.1b - Mercury assessment

5.3104.1c - Removal (if removal is recommended)

5.3104.1d - Installation

5.3104.1e - Disposal

5.3104.1f - Occupant education

5.3104.2 Maintenance: Gas Boiler Service Inspection

5.3104.2a - Visual inspection

5.3104.2b - Appliance gas valve

5.3104.2c - Ignition system.

5.3104.2d - Main gas burners

5.3104.2e - Venting

5.3104.2f - Flue gas testing

5.3104.2g - Combustion efficiency checks

5.3104.2h - Occupant health

5.3104.2i - Occupant eduction

5.3104.3 Maintenance: Checklist

5.3104.3a - Health & safety

5.3104.3b - Visual inspection

5.3104.3c - Pipe insulation inspection

5.3104.3d - Check system pressure

5.3104.3e - Purge system

5.3104.3f - Automatic fill

5.3104.3g - Gauge glass

5.3104.3h - Low water cut-off: float type

5.3104.3i - Low water cut-off: immersion

5.3104.3j - Expansion tank: non-bladder and bladder

5.3104.3k - Flush or skim steam boiler

5.3104.3l - System temperature or pressure gauge

5.3104.3m - Circulators

5.3104.3n - Zone valves

5.3104.3o - Condensate

5.3104.3p - Temperature, pressure valves, and air vents

5.3104.3q - Maintenance records

5.3104.3r - Occupant health and safety

5.3104.3s - Occupant education

6 Ventilation

6.60 Exhaust

6.6002 Components

6.6002.1 Ducts

6.6002.1a - Duct design and configuration

6.6002.1b - Termination fitting

6.6002.1c - Duct support

6.6002.1d - Duct Connections

6.6002.1e - Duct Materials

6.6002.2 Terminations

6.6002.2a - Hole in building shell

6.6002.2b - Termination fitting

6.6002.2c - Duct to termination connection

6.6002.2d - Weatherproof installation

6.6002.2e - Pest exclusion

6.6002.2f - Termination location

6.6002.2g - Kitchen exhaust

6.6002.3 Exhaust-Only Ventilation - Fan Intake Grille Location

6.6002.3a - Primary whole house ventilation

6.6002.3b - Local ventilation

6.6003 Fans

6.6003.1 Surface-Mounted Ducted

6.6003.1a - Hole through interior surface

6.6003.1b - Wiring

6.6003.1c - Fan mounting

6.6003.1d - Backdraft damper

6.6003.1e - Duct to fan connection

6.6003.1f - Fan housing seal

6.6003.1g - Fan to interior surface seal

6.6003.1h - Air flow

6.6003.1i - Preventing air leakage caused by exhaust fans

6.6003.1j - Combustion safety

6.6003.2 Inline

6.6003.2a - Wiring

6.6003.2b - Access

6.6003.2c - Fan mounting

6.6003.2d - Backdraft damper

6.6003.2e - Duct connections

6.6003.2f - Boot to interior surface seal

6.6003.2g - Air flow

6.6003.2h - Preventing air leakage caused by exhaust fans

6.6003.2i - Combustion safety

6.6003.3 Through the Wall

6.6003.3a - Hole in building shell for fan through the wall

6.6003.3b - Wiring

6.6003.3c - Fan Mounting

6.6003.3d - Weatherproof installation of fans through the wall

6.6003.3e - Backdraft damper

6.6003.3f - Fan housing seal

6.6003.3g - Fan to interior surface seal

6.6003.3h - Insulation

6.6003.3i - Air flow

6.6003.3j - Preventing air leakage caused by exhaust fans

6.6003.3k - Combustion safety

6.6005 Appliance Exhaust Vents

6.6005.1 Clothes Dryer

6.6005.1a - Clothes dryer ducting

6.6005.1b - Termination fitting

6.6005.1c - Make-up air

6.6005.1d - Combustion safety

6.6005.1e - Occupant education

6.6005.2 Kitchen range

6.6005.2a - Wiring

6.6005.2b - Fan venting

6.6005.2c - Fan ducting

6.6005.2d - Termination fitting

6.6005.2e - Make-up air

6.6005.2f - Combustion safety

6.6005.2g - Occupant education

6.61 Supply

6.6102 Components

6.6102.1 Outside Air Ventilation Supply Ducts

6.6102.1a - Duct design and configuration

6.6102.1b - Duct insulation

6.6102.1c - Duct support

6.6102.1d - Duct connections

6.6102.1e - Duct materials

6.6102.1f - Outdoor air intake location

6.6102.2 Intakes

6.6102.2a - Hole in building shell

6.6102.2b - Intake fitting

6.6102.2c - Occupant education

6.6102.2d - Damper (if applicable)

6.6102.2e - Connection to intake fitting

6.6102.2f - Weatherproofing

6.6102.2g - Pest exclusion

6.6102.2h - Intake location

6.6102.3 Intake for Ventilation Air to Forced Air System Used for Heating or Cooling

6.6102.3a - Forced air system Requirements

6.6102.3b - Wiring

6.6102.3c - Access

6.6102.3d - Mounting intake duct

6.6102.3e - Motorized damper

6.6102.3f - Intake filter

6.6102.3g - Occupant education

6.6103 Fans

6.6103.1 Inline or Multi-Port

6.6103.1a - Wiring

6.6103.1b - Access

6.6103.1c - Fan mounting

6.6103.1d - Damper (required for intermittent operation)

6.6103.1e - Duct connections

6.6103.1f - Filter

6.6103.1g - Occupant education

6.6103.1h - Boot to interior surface seal

6.6188 Special Considerations

6.6188.1 Removing Supply Vents from Garages

6.6188.1a - Removal of supply/return in garage

6.6188.1b - Patching of the hole in the duct system created by removal

6.6188.1c - Sealing of the patch

6.6188.1d - Removal of discarded ducts

6.6188.1e - Patching of the register hole in garage

6.6188.1f - External static pressure testing

6.62 Whole Building Ventilation

6.6201.2 Primary Ventilation Air Flow between Rooms

6.6201.2a – Balancing pressure

6.6202 Components

6.6202.1 Controls

6.6202.1a - Primary ventilation fan (whole-house volume)

6.6202.1b - Local exhaust - local fan

6.6202.1c - Wiring

6.6202.1d - Manual override

6.6202.1e - Occupant education

6.6288 Special Considerations

6.6288.1 Sound-rating Limits

6.6288.1a - Primary ventilation system or any continuously operating fan

6.6288.1b - Intermittent local ventilation system

6.99 Additional resources

6.9901 Codes and Standards resources

6.9901.1 Supplemental Ventilation Information - ASHRAE 62.2

6.9901.1a - Ventilation fan flow rate

7 Baseload

7.80 Plug Load.

7.8001 Refrigerators

7.8003.1 Refrigerator Replacement

7.8001.1a - Selection

7.8001.1b - Installation

7.8001.1c - Decommissioning

7.8003 Lighting

7.8003.1 Lighting Upgrade

7.8003.1a - Day lighting

7.8003.1b - Selection

7.81 Water Heating

7.8101 Water Use reduction

7.8101.1 Shower Head and Faucet Aerator

7.8101.1a - Work assessment

7.8101.1b - Selection

7.8101.1c - Installation

7.8101.1d - Decommissioning

7.8102 Installation and replacement

7.8102.1 Water Heater Selection

7.8102.1a - Selection parameters

7.8102.1b - Product selection

7.8102.2 Storage-Type Appliance

7.8102.2a - Hazardous material removal

7.8102.2b - Equipment removal

7.8102.2c - New equipment installation

7.8102.2e - Expansion tank - Approved Variance

7.8102.2f - Temperature and pressure relief valve

7.8102.2g - Dielectric unions

7.8102.2h - Backflow prevention

7.8102.2i - Thermal efficiency

7.8102.2j - Fuel supply

7.8102.2k - Discharge temperature

7.8102.2m - Occupant safety

7.8102.2n - Occupant education

7.8102.3 On-Demand Appliance

7.8102.3a - Hazardous material removal

7.8102.3b - Equipment removal

7.8102.3c - New equipment installation

7.8102.3e - Temperature and pressure relief valve

7.8102.3f - Dielectric unions

7.8102.3g - Backflow prevention and pressure regulator

7.8102.3h - Thermal efficiency

7.8102.3i - Required combustion air

7.8102.3j - Venting of flue gases

7.8102.3k - Flue gas testing

7.8102.3l - Electric and fossil fuel supply

7.8102.3m - Cold water supply

7.8102.3n - Discharge temperature

7.8102.3o - Commissioning of system.

7.8102.3p - Ambient carbon monoxide (CO)

7.8102.3q - Occupant education

7.8103 Maintenance/Inspection

7.8103.1 Storage-Type Appliance

7.8103.1a - Health & safety

7.8103.1b - Visual inspection

7.8103.1c - Thermal efficiency - Approved Variance

7.8103.1e - Temperature and pressure relief valve

7.8103.1f - Maintenance records

7.8103.1g - Occupant safety

7.8103.1h - Occupant education

7.8103.2 On-Demand Appliance

7.8103.2a - Health & safety

7.8103.2b - Visual inspection

7.8103.2c - Temperature and pressure relief valve

7.8103.2d - Flue gas testing

7.8103.2e - Required combustion air

7.8103.2f - Venting of flue gases

7.8103.2g - Fuel supply

7.8103.2h - Cold water supply

7.8103.2i - Discharge temperature

7.8103.2j - Test the system safety and operation

7.8103.2k - Maintenance records

7.8103.2l - Occupant health and safety

7.8103.2m - Occupant education

Manufactured Housing Standard Work Specifications

MH 2 Health & Safety

MH 2.01 Safe Work Practices

MH 2.0107 Basements and Crawl Spaces

MH 2.0107.5 Pre-work Qualifications (Home Installation)

MH 2.0107.5a - Installation deficiencies

MH 2.0107.5b - Stabilization

MH 2.02 Combustion Safety

MH 2.0204 Isolation

MH 2.0204.1 Isolating Combustion Water Heater Closet

MH 2.0204.1a - Work assessment

MH 2.0204.1b - Air seal closet

MH 2.0204.1c - Materials

MH 2.0204.1d - Post-work testing / verification

MH 2.04 Moisture

MH 2.0403 Vapor Barriers

MH 2.0403.4 Pier and Skirting Foundations - Ground Moisture Barriers

MH 2.0403.4a - Coverage

MH 2.0403.4b - Material specification

MH 2.0403.4c - Overlap seams

MH 2.0403.4d - Fastening

MH 2.0404.2 Crawl Spaces - Preliminary Dehumidification

MH 2.0404.2a - Close vents

MH 2.0404.2b - Drying

MH 2.0404.2c - Drying Time

MH 2.05 Radon

MH 2.0501 Air Sealing

MH 2.0501.2 Pier and Skirting Foundations - Venting

MH 2.0501.2a - Venting

MH 2.0501.2b - Occupant education

MH 2.06 Electrical

MH 2.0602 Electric Hazards

MH 2.0602.1 Static electric shock

MH 2.0602.1a - Rigid fill tube

MH 2.0602.1b - Metal coupler grounding

MH 2.0602.2 House Current Electric Hazard

MH 2.0602.2a - Metal skin and frame grounding

MH 2.0602.2b - Metal fill tube grounding

MH 2.0602.2c - Electrical tool safety

MH 2.0602.2d - Aluminum wiring

MH 3 Air Sealing

MH 3.10 Attics

MH 3.1001 Penetrations and Chases

MH 3.1001.4 General Penetrations (Electrical, HVAC, Plumbing, Vent Termination, Recessed Lighting)

MH 3.1001.4a - Work assessment

MH 3.1001.4b - Air sealing penetrations

MH 3.1001.4c - Sealant selection

MH 3.1001.4d - Ceiling hole repair

MH 3.1001.4e - Materials

MH 3.1001.4f - High temperature application

MH 3.11 Walls

MH 3.1101 Manufactured Housing Walls

MH 3.1101.1 Exterior Holes and Penetrations

MH 3.1101.1a - Work assessment

MH 3.1101.1b - Materials

MH 3.1101.1c - Exterior wall air sealing

MH 3.1101.2 Interior Holes and Penetrations

MH 3.1101.2a - Work assessment

MH 3.1101.2b - Interior wall air sealing

MH 3.1101.2c - Materials

MH 3.1101.3 Holes, Penetrations, andMarriage Line

MH 3.1101.3a - Work assessment

MH 3.1101.3b - Marriage wall air sealing of holes and penetrations

MH 3.1101.3c - Marriage line air sealing

MH 3.1101.3d - Materials

MH 3.12 Windows and Doors

MH 3.1201 Maintenance, Repair, and Sealing

MH 3.1201.5 Manufactured Housing Windows and Doors

MH 3.1201.5a - Work assessment

MH 3.1201.5b - Lead paint assessment

MH 3.1201.5c - Operable windows and doors

MH 3.1201.5d - Air infiltration

MH 3.1201.5e - Water infiltration

MH 3.1201.5f - Materials

MH 3.1201.5g - Quality assurance

MH 3.1201.5h - Occupant education and maintenance

MH 3.1201.6 Interior Storm Windows

MH 3.1201.6a - Work assessment

MH 3.1201.6b - Fixed storm window

MH 3.1201.6c - Installing operable storm window

MH 3.1201.6d - Health & safety

MH 3.1201.6e - Occupant education

MH 3.1202 Repairing/Replacing Cracked and Broken Glass

MH 3.1202.3 Replacing Damaged Window Glass in Manufactured Housing

MH 3.1202.3a - Work assessment

MH 3.1202.3b - Lead paint assessment

MH 3.1202.3c - Broken glass removal

MH 3.1202.3d - Opening preparation

MH 3.1202.3e - New glass installation

MH 3.1203 Replacement

MH 3.1203.3 Replacement of Manufactured Housing Windows and Doors

MH 3.1203.3a - Work assessment

MH 3.1203.3b - Lead paint assessment

MH 3.1203.3c - Window or door selection - Approved Variance

MH 3.1203.3d - Rough opening preparation

MH 3.1203.3e - Window and door installation

MH 3.1203.3f - Safety

MH 3.1203.3g - Maintenance and occupant education

MH 3.13 Floors

MH 3.1301 Penetrations

MH 3.1301.1 Electrical, HVAC, Plumbing, Gas, Dryer Vent, and General Penetrations Through Bottom Board

MH 3.1301.1a - Work assessment

MH 3.1301.1b - Soft bottom board repair

MH 3.1301.1c - Hard bottom board repair

MH 3.1301.1d - Bottom board penetrations

MH 3.1301.1e - Materials

MH 3.1301.2 Electrical, HVAC, Plumbing, Gas, Dryer Vent, and General Penetrations Through Flooring

MH 3.1301.2a - Work assessment

MH 3.1301.2b - Floor air sealing (decking, subfloor, floor decking)

MH 3.1301.2c - Sealant selection

MH 3.1301.2d - Floor repair

MH 3.1301.2e - Structural materials

MH 3.1301.2f - High temperature application

MH 3.1302 Floor Framing

MH 3.1302.1 Floor Framing - Bay Window

MH 3.1302.1a - Work assessment

MH 3.1302.1b - Lead paint assessment

MH 3.1302.1c - Air infiltration

MH 3.1302.1d - Water infiltration

MH 3.1302.1e - Materials

MH 3.14 Basements and Crawl Spaces

MH 3.1488 Special Considerations

MH 3.1488.2 Skirting Manufactured Homes

MH 3.1488.2a - Work assessment

MH 3.1488.2b - Repair and installation

MH 3.1488.2c - Venting

MH 3.1488.2d - Insulated skirting

MH 3.1488.2e - Flashing

MH 3.1488.2f - Materials

MH 3.1488.2g - Fasteners

MH 3.1488.2h - Structural

MH 3.1488.2i - Skirting stiffener / high wind support

MH 3.1488.2j - Occupant education

MH 3.16 Ducts

MH 3.1601 Duct Preparation

MH 3.1601.4 Support for Horizontal, Suspended Ducts

MH 3.1601.4a - Support (applies to all duct types)

MH 3.1601.5 Preparation and Mechanical Fastening

MH 3.1601.5a - Preparation

MH 3.1601.5b - Metal to metal

MH 3.1601.5c - Flex to metal

MH 3.1601.5d - Duct board to duct board

MH 3.1601.5e - Duct board to flexible duct

MH 3.1601.5f - Duct board plenum to air handler cabinet

MH 3.1601.5g - Boot to wood

MH 3.1601.5h - Boot to gypsum

MH 3.1601.5i - Duct board to flex

MH 3.1602 Duct Sealing

MH 3.1602.8 Suply Plenum (Furnace to Trunk Duct Connection) in Both Upflow and Downflow Air Handler Configurations

MH 3.1602.8b - Preparation

MH 3.1602.8c - Plenum rebuild or repair

MH 3.1602.8d - Repair work access

MH 3.1602.8e - Safety testing

MH 3.1602.8f - Performance testing

MH 3.1602.9 Crossover Ducts

MH 3.1602.9a - Work assessment

MH 3.1602.9b - Flexible crossover duct connections

MH 3.1602.9c - Support

MH 3.1602.9d - Through-the-rim crossover duct

MH 3.1602.9e - Repair work access for through-the-rim crossover

MH 3.1602.9f - Attic crossover

MH 3.1602.9g - Combustion Appliance Zone ( CAZ ) testing

MH 3.1602.9h - Performance testing

MH 3.1602.10 Hard and Flex Branch Ducts

MH 3.1602.10a - Work assessment

MH 3.1602.10b - Reduce excess flex duct length

MH 3.1602.10c - Duct connection repairs

MH 3.1602.10d - Repair work access

MH 3.1602.10e - Combustion Appliance Zone ( CAZ ) testing

MH 3.1602.10f - Performance testing

MH 3.1602.11 Air Sealing System

MH 3.1602.11a - New component to new component sealant selection

MH 3.1602.11b - New component to existing component

MH 3.1602.11c - Existing component to existing component

MH 3.1602.11d - Performance testing

MH 3.1602.12 Air Sealing System Components

MH 3.1602.12a - Duct boot to interior surface

MH 3.1602.12b - Air handler cabinet outside conditioned space

MH 3.1602.12c - Performance testing

MH 3.1602.13 Return - Framed Platform

MH 3.1602.13a - Preparation

MH 3.1602.13b - Infill and backing

MH 3.1602.13c - Sealant selection

MH 3.17 Additions

MH 3.1701 Attached Additions

MH 3.1701.1 Holes, Penetrations, and Connection Seam

MH 3.1701.1a - Work assessment

MH 3.1701.1b - Hole, seam, line, and penetration sealing

MH 3.1701.1c - Materials

MH 3.1701.1d - Addition exterior wall air sealing

MH 3.1701.1e - Addition interior wall air sealing

MH 3.1701.1f - Addition floor air sealing (decking, subfloor, floor decking)

MH 3.1701.1g - Sealant selection

MH 3.1701.1h - Floor repair

MH 3.1701.1i - Structural materials

MH 3.1701.1j - Ceiling hole repair

MH 3.1701.1k - High temperature application

MH 4 Insulation

MH 4.10 Attics

MH 4.1003 Attic Ceilings

MH 4.1003.8 Installing Fiberglass Blown Insulation for Flat, Bowed, or Vaulted Ceilings (via Roof Side Lift)

MH 4.1003.8a - Attic, ceiling, and roof verification

MH 4.1003.8b - Attic access

MH 4.1003.8c - Blowing machine set up

MH 4.1003.8d - Fiberglass blown insulation installation

MH 4.1003.8e - Roof reattachment

MH 4.1003.8f - Verification of details

MH 4.1003.8g - Onsite documentation

MH 4.1003.9 Installing Fiberglass Blown Insulation for Flat, Bowed, or Vaulted Ceilings (via Exterior Access from Top of Roof)

MH 4.1003.9a - Attic, ceiling, and roof verification

MH 4.1003.9b - Attic access

MH 4.1003.9c - Blowing machine set up

MH 4.1003.9d - Fiberglass blown insulation installation

MH 4.1003.9e -Patching and sealing openings

MH 4.1003.9f - Verification of details

MH 4.1003.9g - Onsite documentation

MH 4.1003.10 Installing Fiberglass Blown Insulation for Flat, Bowed, or Vaulted Ceilings (via Interior Access through the Ceiling)

MH 4.1003.10a - Attic, ceiling, and roof verification

MH 4.1003.10b - Construction prep

MH 4.1003.10c - Attic access

MH 4.1003.10d - Blowing machine set up

MH 4.1003.10e -Fiberglass blown insulation installation

MH 4.1003.10f - Patching and sealing holes

MH 4.1003.10g - Verification of details

MH 4.1003.10h - Onsite documentation

MH 4.1003.11 Installing Fiberglass Blown Insulation in Roof-Over Constructions

MH 4.1003.11a - Roof-over overview

MH 4.1003.11b - Onsite documentation

MH 4.1088 Special Considerations

MH 4.1088.6 Installing Insulation at Flat and Cathedral Ceiling Transition Wall

MH 4.1088.6a - Insulation installation verification

MH 4.1088.6b - Access attic

MH 4.1088.6c - Blowing machine set up

MH 4.1088.6d - Spray two-part foam

MH 4.1088.6e - Batt

MH 4.1088.6f - Patching and sealing access points

MH 4.1088.6g - Verification of details

MH 4.1088.6h - Onsite documentation

MH 4.11 Walls

MH 4.1101 Preparation

MH 4.1101.5 Exterior Wall Dense Packing

MH 4.1101.5a - Preparation

MH 4.1101.5b - Exterior dense pack

MH 4.1104 Manufactured Housing Wall Insulation

MH 4.1104.1 Stuffing Wall Cavities with Fiberglass Batts

MH 4.1104.1a - Access wall cavities

MH 4.1104.1b - Exterior wall cavity inspection

MH 4.1104.1c - Fiberglass batt installation tool (stuffer)

MH 4.1104.1d - Fiberglass batt installation

MH 4.1104.1e - Sub-sheathing patch and repair

MH 4.1104.1f - Reattachment

MH 4.1104.1g - Onsite documentation

MH 4.1104.2 Fiberglass Blown Insulation Installation (Lifting Siding)

MH 4.1104.2a - Access wall cavities

MH 4.1104.2b - Exterior wall cavity inspection

MH 4.1104.2c - Blowing machine set up

MH 4.1104.2d - Fiberglass blown insulation installation

MH 4.1104.2e - Sub-sheathing patch and repair

MH 4.1104.2f - Reattachment

MH 4.1104.2g - Onsite documentation

MH 4.1104.3 Fiberglass Blown Insulation Installation (via Penetrations through or Behind the Siding)

MH 4.1104.3a - Access wall cavities

MH 4.1104.3b - Exterior wall cavity inspection

MH 4.1104.3c - Blowing machine set up

MH 4.1104.3d - Fiberglass blown insulation installation

MH 4.1104.3e - Plug and seal holes

MH 4.1104.3f - Final wall assembly

MH 4.1104.3g - Onsite documentation

MH 4.1104.4 Spray Foam Insulation Installation in Cavities above Doors and Windows

MH 4.1104.4a - Access wall cavities above doors and windows

MH 4.1104.4b - Cavity inspection

MH 4.1104.4c - Insulation installation

MH 4.1104.4d - Final wall assembly

MH 4.1104.4e - Onsite documentation

MH 4.13 Floors

MH 4.1302 Manufactured Housing Belly Preparation

MH 4.1302.1 Prepare Belly Floor Cavity for Insulation

MH 4.1302.1a - Work assessment

MH 4.1302.1b - Preparation

MH 4.1303 Manufactured Housing Floor Cavity Insulation

MH 4.1303.1 Insulation of Floor Cavity with Blown Material

MH 4.1303.1a - R-value

MH 4.1303.1b - Work assessment

MH 4.1303.1c - Insulate floors

MH 4.1303.1d - Materials

MH 4.1303.1e - Occupant education

MH 4.1303.2 Insulation of Floor Cavity with Batt Material

MH 4.1303.2a - R-value

MH 4.1303.2b - Work assessment

MH 4.1303.2c - Insulate floors

MH 4.1303.2d - Materials

MH 4.1303.2e - Occupant education

MH 4.1303.3 Insulation of Floor Cavity with Spray Foam Material

MH 4.1303.3a - R-value

MH 4.1303.3b - Work assessment

MH 4.1303.3c - Preparation

MH 4.1303.3d - Installation

MH 4.1303.3e - Materials

MH 4.1303.3f - Fire protection

MH 4.1303.3g - Occupant education

MH 4.16 Ducts

MH 4.1601 Insulating Ducts

MH 4.1601.3 Insulation and Vapor Barrier

MH 4.1601.3a - Ducts in unconditioned spaces (e.g., crawl space, attic, unconditioned basements)

MH 4.1601.3b - Ducts within floor assemblies

MH 4.1601.3c - Exposed metal

MH 4.1601.5 Insulating Metal Ducts

MH 4.1601.5a - Selection of duct insulation material

MH 4.1601.5b - Duct sealing

MH 4.1601.5c - Attachment of duct insulation

MH 4.1601.5d - Taping of the vapor barrier

MH 4.1601.5e - Vermin proofing

MH 5 Heating and Cooling

MH 5.30 Forced Air

MH 5.3001 Design

MH 5.3001.3 Replace Return Air Systems that Incorporate Floor Cavity (Belly) and/or Attic Return Air Pathway

MH 5.3001.3a - Close Return Air Openings

MH 5.3001.3b - Alternate return air system

MH 5.3001.3c - Zone pressure test

MH 5.3001.3d - Combustion Appliance Zone ( CAZ ) testing

MH 5.3001.3e - Occupant education

MH 5.3003 System Assessment and Maintenance

MH 5.3003.11 Heating and Cooling Controls

MH 5.3003.11a - Removal of mercury-based thermostats

MH 5.3003.11b - Removal of existing controls

MH 5.3003.11c - Penetrations

MH 5.3003.11d - Thermostat location

MH 5.3003.11e - Blower speed

MH 5.3003.11f - Thermostat selection: heat pump

MH 5.3003.11g - Heat pump: supplementary heat

MH 5.3003.11h - Heat pump: low ambient compressor lockout

MH 5.3003.11i - Heat pump: outside air sensor

MH 5.3003.11j - Heat pump: supplementary heat wiring

MH 5.3003.11k - Thermostat: installer programming

MH 5.3003.11l - Time delay settings

MH 5.3003.11m - Humidistat: location

MH 5.3003.11n - Ventilation control

MH 5.3003.11o - Occupant education

MH 5.3003.15 Combustion Analysis of Oil-Fired Appliances

MH 5.3003.15a - Oil system: smoke test

MH 5.3003.15c - Oil filter

MH 5.3003.15d - Fuel pressure

MH 5.3003.15e - Oil system: steady state efficiency (SSE)

MH 5.3003.15f - Net stack temperature

MH 5.3003.15g - Carbon Dioxide (CO2) and oxygen (O2)

MH 5.3003.15h - Excess combustion air

MH 5.3003.15i - CO in flue gas

MH 5.3003.15j - Testing inspection holes

MH 5.3003.16 Evaluating Electrical Service

MH 5.3003.16a - Service Entrance

MH 5.3003.16b - Polarity

MH 5.3003.16c - Voltage: incoming power

MH 5.3003.16d - Voltage: contactor

MH 5.3003.16e - Grounding

MH 5.3003.16f - Blower amperage

MH 5.3003.16g - Compressor amperage

MH 5.3003.16h - Door switch operation

MH 5.3003.16i - Heat pump: emergency heat

MH 6 Ventilation

MH 6.60 Exhaust

MH 6.6002 Components

MH 6.6002.4 Ducts (Exhaust Fans)

MH 6.6002.4a - Duct design and configuration

MH 6.6002.4b - Duct insulation

MH 6.6002.4c - Duct support

MH 6.6002.4d - Duct connections

MH 6.6002.4e - Duct materials

MH 6.6002.4f - Total exhaust airflow

MH 6.6003 Fans

MH 6.6003.1 Surface-Mounted Ducted

MH 6.6003.1a - Hole through interior surface

MH 6.6003.1b - Wiring

MH 6.6003.1c - Fan mounting

MH 6.6003.1d - Backdraft damper

MH 6.6003.1e - Duct-to-fan connection

MH 6.6003.1f - Fan housing seal

MH 6.6003.1g - Fan to interior surface seal

MH 6.6003.1h - Air flow

MH 6.6003.1i - Preventing air leakage caused by exhaust fans

MH 6.6003.1j - Combustion safety

MH 6.6003.2 Inline

MH 6.6003.2a - Wiring

MH 6.6003.2b - Access

MH 6.6003.2c - Fan mounting

MH 6.6003.2d - Backdraft damper

MH 6.6003.2e - Duct connections

MH 6.6003.2f - Boot to interior surface seal

MH 6.6003.2g - Air flow

MH 6.6003.2h - Preventing air leakage caused by exhaust fans

MH 6.6003.2i - Combustion safety

MH 6.6003.5 Garage Exhaust Fan

MH 6.6003.5b - Air leakage

MH 6.6003.5c - Combustion safety

MH 6.6003.6 Fan Placement (Whole House/Common Space Exhaust Only)

MH 6.6003.6a - Clearance

MH 6.6003.6b - Power source

MH 6.6003.6c - Location

MH 6.6003.6d - Duct/vent

MH 6.6003.6e - Attachment

MH 6.6003.6f - Total exhaust airflow

MH 6.61 Supply

MH 6.6102 Components

MH 6.6102.4 Intake for Ventilation Air to Forced Air System Used for Heating or Cooling

MH 6.6102.4a - Forced air system Requirements

MH 6.6102.4b - Wiring

MH 6.6102.4c - Access

MH 6.6102.4d - Mounting intake duct

MH 6.6102.4e - Motorized damper

MH 6.6102.4f - Intake filter

MH 6.6102.4g - Occupant education

MH 6.6102.4h - Intake ventilation airflow

MH 6.6188 Special Considerations

MH 6.6188.2 Removing Supply Vents from Garages

MH 6.6188.2a - Removal of supply/return in garage

MH 6.6188.2b - Patching of the hole in the duct system created by removal

MH 6.6188.2c - Sealing of the patch

MH 6.6188.2d - Removal of discarded ducts

MH 6.6188.2e - Patching of the register hole in garage

MH 6.6188.2f - External static pressure testing

MH 6.6188.2g - CAZ testing

MH 6.62 Whole Building Ventilation

MH 6.6205 Exhaust-Only System

MH 6.6205.1 Manufactured Housing Exhaust-Only Strategies

MH 6.6205.1a - Assessment

MH 6.6205.1b - Selection

MH 6.6205.1c - Location

MH 6.6205.1d - Climate considerations

MH 6.6205.1e - Combustion Appliance Zone ( CAZ ) testing

MH 6.6205.1f - Occupant education

MH 6.6205.1g - Total exhaust airflow

MH 6.6288 Special Considerations

MH 6.6288.2 Sound Ratings - New Fan Installation

MH 6.6288.2a - Primary ventilation system/continuously operating fan

MH 6.6288.2b - Intermittent spot ventilation system

NeWap Installation Standards - Field Guide

1 Inspections, Energy Audits, Deferrals and Client Education

Completing a thorough and accurate inspection and energy audit is essential for assessing how much energy a building uses, how the building uses the energy, what measures are cost effective for implementation in the building and how much energy costs can be saved following implementation.

Utilizing a systematic process of inspecting, documenting, evaluating and analyzing the building and its energy using systems helps ensure the accuracy of the savings-to-investment ratio ( SIR ) calculations for installing energy efficiency measures through the Nebraska Weatherization Assistance Program (NeWAP).

1.01 Inspections

1.0101 Initial On-Site Inspection

Completing an accurate on-site inspection for use in completing an Energy Audit includes but is not limited to.

2.0102.1 (a, b, c, d) Health & Safety - Safe Work Practices - Insulation - Vermiculite (SF) (MH)

2.0105.1 (a) Health & Safety - Safe Work Practices - Baseload - Baseload Worker Safety (SF) (MH)

2.0203.1 (a, b, c) Health & Safety - Combustion Safety - Vented Gas Appliances - Combustion Air for Natural Draft Appliances (SF) (MH)

2.0103.1 (a, b, c) Health & Safety - Safe Work Practices - Heating and Cooling Equipment - Combustion Worker Safety (SF) (MH)

Roof Vent Net Free Vent Area
8" diameter 50 square inches
9" diameter 60 square inches
9.5" diameter 70 square inches
10" diameter 80 square inches
13.5" diameter 144 square inches
Turbine 239 square inches
Rectangular Gable Vent Net Free Vent Area
8" x 12" 48 square inches
12" x 18" 108 square inches
14" x 24" 168 square inches
18" x 24" 216 square inches
24" x 30" 360 square inches
Soffit Vent Net Free Vent Area
4" x 16" 32 square inches
8" x 16" 64 square inches
4" x 8" 16 square inches
Triangular Gable Vent Net Free Vent Area
30" base 82 square inches
48" base 144 square inches
72" base 197 square inches

1.0102 Pre-Implementation Inspection

When you receive the weatherization file review and other related documents:

At the job site greet the owner/tenant, identify yourself, state your purpose, and review the job schedule.

Walk around the exterior of the home.

Walk through the interior of the home.

Complete initial diagnostics.

Review proposed work with the client.

1.0103 Quality Control Inspections

As per U.S. Department of Energy Weatherization Program Notice 15-4: Every unit reported as a "completed unit" must receive a final quality control inspection ensuring that all work meets the minimum specifications outlined in the Standard Work Specification (SWS) in accordance with 10 CFR 440. Quality control inspections ensure that weatherization services have been provided in a quality manner and that the home is left in a safe condition.

All Quality Control Inspections will include, but not be limited to:

1.02 Energy Audit

Completing an accurate Energy Audit requires appropriate analysis of the on-site inspection information based on the following NeWAP requirements:

Lawrence Berkley National Laboratory (LBL)
Heating and Cooling Equipment Efficiency Table
Pre-1970 - 1989
Year Heating Equipment Cooling Equipment
Central Furnace /
Room (Wall) Furnace
Central
Heat
Pump
Electrical
Resistance
Central
AC
Central
Heat
Pump
Room
AC/HP
Natural
Gas
Propane Oil/
Kerosene
Electricity Electricity Electricity Electricity Electricity Electricity
AFUE AFUE AFUE Percent HSPF Percent SEER SEER EER
Pre-
1970
60 60 70 98 6.21 98 6.5 5.5 5.8
1971 61.4 61.4 71.8 98 6.21 98 6.58 5.86 5.89
1972 62.7 62.7 73.6 98 6.21 98 6.66 6.21 5.98
1973 62.7 62.7 73.6 98 6.21 98 6.75 6.21 6
1974 62.7 62.7 73.6 98 6.21 98 6.85 6.21 6.1
1975 65.8 62.7 73.6 98 6.21 98 6.97 6.21 6.2
1976 66.1 63 74.1 98 6.21 98 7.03 6.87 6.4
1977 66.4 63.3 74.5 98 6.21 98 7.13 6.89 6.55
1978 66.7 63.6 75 98 6.21 98 7.34 7.24 6.72
1979 68.7 64.8 75.5 98 6.21 98 7.47 7.34 6.87
1980 70.6 65.9 76 98 6.21 98 7.55 7.51 7.02
1981 70.4 67.1 76.8 98 6.21 98 7.78 7.7 7.06
1982 70.3 68.4 77.5 98 6.21 98 8.31 7.79 7.14
1983 70.1 69.6 78.3 98 6.2 98 8.43 8.23 7.29
1984 72.6 73 78.6 98 6.36 98 8.66 8.45 7.48
1985 72.9 73.8 78.6 98 6.39 98 8.82 8.56 7.7
1986 73.7 74.3 79.6 98 6.55 98 8.87 8.7 7.8
1987 74.3 75.1 79.8 98 6.71 98 8.97 8.93 8.06
1988 74.9 75.8 80.4 98 6.88 98 9.11 9.13 8.23
1989 74.7 75.5 80.4 98 6.92 98 9.25 9.26 8.48
Lawrence Berkley National Laboratory (LBL)
Heating and Cooling Equipment Efficiency Table
1990 - Present Day
Year Heating Equipment Cooling Equipment
Central Furnace /
Room (Wall) Furnace
Central
Heat
Pump
Electrical
Resistance
Central
AC
Central
Heat
Pump
Room
AC/HP
Natural
Gas
Propane Oil/
Kerosene
Electricity Electricity Electricity Electricity Electricity Electricity
AFUE AFUE AFUE Percent HSPF Percent SEER SEER EER
1990 76.7 75.7 80.3 98 7.03 98 9.31 9.46 8.73
1991 77.5 76.9 80.8 98 7.06 98 9.49 9.77 8.8
1992 82.1 83.2 80.8 98 7.1 98 10.46 10.6 8.88
1993 82.4 83.8 80.9 98 7.1 98 10.56 10.86 9.05
1994 82.4 83.9 80.9 98 7.1 98 10.61 10.94 8.97
1995 82.3 84.1 80.9 98 7.1 98 10.68 10.97 9.03
1996 82.7 84.1 80.9 98 7.4 98 10.68 11 9.08
1997 82.9 84.1 80.9 98 7.1 98 10.66 10.97 9.09
1998 82.6 84.1 80.9 98 7.4 98 10.92 11.29 9.08
1999 82.6 84.1 80.9 98 7.4 98 10.96 11.29 9.07
2000 82.6 84.1 80.9 98 7.4 98 10.95 11.21 9.3
2001 83.1 84.1 80.9 98 7.4 98 11.04 11.3 9.63
2002 83.1 84.1 80.9 98 7.4 98 11.07 11.31 9.75
2003 82.5 84.1 80.9 98 7.4 98 11.19 11.46 9.75
2004 82.6 84.1 80.9 98 7.4 98 11.29 11.56 9.71
2005 82.9 84.1 80.9 98 7.4 98 11.32 11.6 9.95
2006 82 84.1 80.9 98 7.9 98 13.17 13.17 10.02
2007 84.1 84.1 80.9 98 7.9 98 13.66 13.66 9.81
2008 84.8 84.1 80.9 98 7.9 98 13.76 13.76 9.93
2009 84.8 84.1 80.9 98 7.9 98 13.76 13.76 9.93
2010
&
later
84.8 84.1 80.9 98 7.9 98 13.76 13.76 9.93

Verify that the Energy Audit measures recommended for implementation by the NEAT, the MHEA or the MulTEA audit have individual SIRs of 1.0 or greater.

Verify that the Energy Audit measures with an SIR of less than 1.0 are not to be implemented; Installing a measure(s) with a lower SIR without installing others with greater SIRs is not allowed.

Verify that the cumulative SIR for the home exceeds 1.0 or the home must not be weatherized.

Verify and document that all additional weatherization mandatory requirements included in the Installation Standards are implemented, in addition to the measures that are required to be implemented based on Energy Audit. Any exceptions associated with not completing recommended or required measures must be appropriately documented in the client's file.

Verify that all Energy Audits are completed using the Key Parameters and Default Parameters established by the Energy Office with no modifications unless authorized.

Note: Blown fiberglass insulation is non-corrosive to metal skinned manufactured housing and can achieve good R-values and convection resistance at lower densities and weights that won't cause damage to the interior sheeting or underbelly of the home. Installations that include cellulose insulation may be completed only after warrantee information is provided by the installer ensuring no future damage to either the ceiling or underbelly of the home as a result of the use of cellulose insulation.

Energy Audits determine what energy efficiency measures must be implemented. The Installation Standards determine how Energy Audit measures are to be implemented.

Verify that Ineligible Materials/Measures, as listed below, are not recommended for implementation or installed.

Verify that, pursuant to DOE Guidance:

Verify that the Nebraska Energy Office has reviewed the submission from the subgrantee and made a compliance determination regarding DOE Guidance as well as whether the proposed measure cost test are reasonable (ex. no manipulation of the costs have occurred to make certain measures allowable). Following NEO approval, the project package was submitted (by NEO) to the DOE Project Officer requesting DOE approval to proceed with the project.

Verify and document all repair costs necessary for the installation or preservation of an energy saving weatherization measure are included in the audit.

Keep in mind that:

Verify that the home complies with ASHRAE Standard 62.2 as per DOE Guidance requirement.

1.03 Deferrals

The decision to defer work in a dwelling is difficult but necessary in some cases. Subgrantees are expected to pursue reasonable options on behalf of clients and to use good judgment in dealing with difficult situations. Deferral conditions may be found in the Health & Safety Section 2 of this Installation Standard.

Should any dwelling be determined to be a deferral:

A "walk-away/deferral" is not a completion. Reimbursement for costs associated with a "walk-away/ deferral" must be obtained through the normal monthly billing process. Indicate on the BCJO (Building Check Job Order) that the dwelling is a "walk-away/deferral", not a completion and the client was advised in writing of the conditions determining this status.

Defer all units undergoing remodeling or which have untreated remodeled areas that directly affect the weatherization process.

1.04 Client Education

The NeWAP provides subgrantees with opportunities to educate clients and provide them with some simple, easy and inexpensive energy saving tips to help them save additional energy while improving comfort.

1.0401 Heating and Cooling Saving Suggestions:

1.0402 Hot Water and Laundry Saving Suggestions:

1.0403 Other Energy Saving Opportunities:

1.0404 Health & Safety Educational Material

The NeWAP requires that all clients be provided with educational material specifically associated with Health & Safety issues with documentation of receipt included in the client file.

2 Health & Safety

Health & Safety measures must be performed in conjunction with cost-effective weatherization. Allowable Health & Safety activities are those that eliminate hazards that are affected or caused by the installation of weatherization materials.

Major hazards and potentially life-threatening conditions must be corrected before weatherization installers can work in the dwelling unless the installers are making the corrections.

When a weatherization agency finds serious safety problems in a customer's home, they must inform the customer in writing about the hazards. When deferral is necessary, provide information to the client, in writing, describing conditions that must be met in order for weatherization to commence. A copy of this notification must also be placed in the client file.

When Not to Weatherize a Dwelling

There are some conditions and situations under which a subgrantee must not or may choose not to weatherize an otherwise eligible dwelling unit. Information for making this determination may become evident during either the eligibility process or during the initial inspection. If the subgrantee makes a determination that there are circumstances that prevent the weatherization process from proceeding, they must:

At the time of application, the applicant is given a written notice outlining the applicant's rights and the method to file a complaint. All subgrantees are required to adhere to their agency's grievance polices. If the grievance cannot be resolved through the subgrantee's process, the applicant may file a complaint with the Nebraska Energy Office.

A subgrantee must not weatherize if:

A subgrantee may choose not to weatherize a dwelling unit if:

Client Health & Safety

There are a number of important Health & Safety issues related to weatherization work that can impact clients as well as weatherization employees. When any of these issues are detected, the client must be informed of the issue and, if possible, addressing these problems should be a top priority.

Health & Safety Assessment

Energy Auditors and crews/subcontractors are required to take all reasonable precautions against performing work on homes that will subject workers or clients to Health & Safety risks. The initial home inspection must include a Health & Safety assessment of the dwelling. The assessment must include interviewing the client regarding known health concerns, inspecting the dwelling for present or potential moisture concerns, indoor air quality concerns and other environmental concerns or hazards that may or may not be covered by the NeWAP.

Health & Safety Home Screening Questionnaire (Form WX7)

If it is determined through the Health & Safety Home Screening Questionnaire that someone in the home is sensitive to a product that is intended to be used during the weatherization process, the sensitivity must be documented in the file and, if possible, an alternative product may be used. If no successful alternative is found, the weatherization of the home may proceed without completion of the measure with no impact on weatherization measures with lower SIRs, with prior Nebraska Energy Office approval.

When a client's health is fragile and/or the weatherization activities would constitute a health or safety hazard, the occupants at risk will be required to leave the home during the activities. Request that the client return at least 1 hour (or a reasonable time as determined by the installers) after installers are scheduled to leave to allow for clean-up and appropriate ventilation of the home.

Weatherization funds cannot be used to relocate clients or reimburse them for such costs incurred because of the requirement to leave during the day. If the client is unable to leave the home and the intended work may exacerbate an occupant's health condition, the home may need to be deferred.

Subgrantees must take all reasonable precautions against performing work on homes that would subject clients to Health & Safety risks.

Clients will also receive the following publications and/or documents:

2.01 Universal Safe Work Practices

Worker Health & Safety

Weatherization staff are vitally important and staff must not be required to work in unsafe and/or unhealthy unsanitary conditions. Costs related to Grantee Health & Safety training must be charged to Training & Technical Assistance.

2.0106.1 (a, b, c) Health & Safety - Safe Work Practices - Material Safety - Material Selection, Labeling, and Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs) (SF) (MH)

2.0100.1b (b, c, d, e, f, g, h, i, j, k, l, m, n, o, p, r) Health & Safety - Safe Work Practices - Global Worker Safety (SF) (MH)

2.0103.2 (d) Health & Safety - Safe Work Practices - Heating and Cooling Equipment - Heating and Cooling Worker Safety - Personal Protective Equipment (SF) (MH)

2.0100.1 (b, c, d, e, f, g, h, i, j, k, l, m, n, o, p, r) Health & Safety - Safe Work Practices - Global Worker Safety (SF) (MH)

2.0101.1 (a) Health & Safety - Safe Work Practices - Air Sealing - Air Sealing Worker Safety (SF) (MH)

2.0104.1 (a) Health & Safety - Ventilation Equipment - Ventilation Worker Safety (SF) (MH)

2.0100.1 (h) Health & Safety - Safe Work Practices - Global Worker Safety - Power Tool Safety (SF) (MH)

2.0100.1 (d) Health & Safety - Safe Work Practices - Global Worker Safety - Electrical Safety (SF) (MH)

2.0100.1 (j) Health & Safety - Safe Work Practices - Global Worker Safety - Ergonomic Safety (SF) (MH)

First aid supplies must be available in the office and at the job site.

Potential Hazard Considerations

Weatherization services must be provided in a manner that minimizes other potential risks to workers and clients. Awareness of potential hazards is essential in providing quality weatherization services. A list of common weatherization work situations that may present hazardous situations are addressed below:

2.0100 Safe Work Practices

2.0100.1 Global Worker Safety

2.0100.1 (b, c, d, e, f, g, h, i, j, k, l, m, n, o, p, r) Health & Safety - Safe Work Practices - Global Worker Safety (SF) (MH)

2.0101 Air Sealing

2.0101.1 (a, b, c, d) Health & Safety - Safe Work Practices - Air Sealing - Air Sealing Worker Safety (SF) (MH)

2.0102 Insulation

2.0102.1 (a, b, c, d) Health & Safety - Safe Work Practices - Insulation - Insulation Worker Safety (SF) (MH)

2.0103 Heating and Cooling Equipment

2.0103.1 (a, b, c) Health & Safety - Safe Work Practices- Heating and Cooling Equipment - Combustion Worker Safety (SF) (MH)

2.0103.2 (d) Health & Safety - Safe Work Practices - Heating and Cooling Equipment - Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) (SF) (MH)

2.0201.1 (a, b, c, d, e) Health & Safety - Combustion Safety - Combustion Safety General - Combustion Appliance Zone (CAZ) Testing (SF) (MH)

2.0203.1 (a, b, c) Health & Safety - Combustion Safety - Vented Gas Appliances - Combustion Air for Natural Draft Appliances (SF) (MH)

2.0105 Baseload

2.0105.1 (a) Health & Safety - Safe Work Practices - Baseload - Baseload Worker Safety (SF) (MH)

2.0602.1 (a, b) Health & Safety - Electrical - Electrical Hazard - Static Electric Shock (SF) (MH)

2.0106 Material Safety

2.0100.1 (o) Health & Safety - Global Worker Safety - Safe Work Practices - Asbestos-containing materials (ACM) (SF) (MH)

2.0102.1 (b) Health & Safety - Safe Work Practices - Insulation - Insulation Worker Safety - Worker Safety - (ACM) (SF) (MH)

2.0106.1 (a) Health & Safety - Safe Work Practices - Material Safety - Material Selection, Labeling, and Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs) (SF) (MH)

2.0107 Basements and Crawl Spaces

2.0107.1 (a) Health & Safety - Safe Work Practices - Basements and Crawl Spaces - Basements and Crawl Spaces Worker Safety (SF)

2.0107.2 (a, b, c, d, e, f, g) Health & Safety - Safe Work Practices - Basements and Crawl Spaces - Crawl Spaces - Pre-Work Qualifications (SF)

2.0107.3 (a, b) Health & Safety - Safe Work Practices - Basements and Crawl Spaces - Crawl Spaces - Debris Removal (SF)

2.0107.4 (a) Health & Safety - Safe Work Practices - Basements and Crawl Spaces - Negative Pressure Contamination Control (SF)

2.02 Heating System Guidance

NeWAP subgrantees' Trained Weatherization Staff or Qualified Heating Technician must complete inspections, testing and assessments on all combustion appliances within a home to ensure all equipment is operating safely.

2.0201 Budget Category Determination

NeWAP subgrantees must perform a full-DOE approved energy audit prior to deciding how to categorize the cost of space heat repair or replacement. If the measure is an approved NeWAP expenditure and the audit justifies the costs with an SIR equal to or greater than 1.0, the measure must be performed and costs charged as an Energy Conservation Measure (ECM). If the measure is not an eligible ECM, the measure may be charged as a Health & Safety (H&S) measure.

2.0202 Code Compliance and Heating System Inspection Requirements

2.0202.1 Code Compliance

Installation of space heating requires knowledge of appropriate industry standards and compliance with the applicable building code(s) in the jurisdiction where the installation is taking place. Building permits shall be secured, where required for all space heater work. This is a program operations cost. Also see 2.0807 Code Compliance.

2.0202.2 Inspection Requirements

Action/Allowability:

2.0203.2 (a, b, c, d, e) Health & Safety - Combustion Safety - Vented Gas Appliances - Combustion Flue Gas - Orphaned Water Heaters (SF)

Testing:

Client Education:

2.0103.1 (b) Health & Safety - Safe Work Practices - Heating and Cooling Equipment - Combustion Worker Safety - Carbon Monoxide (SF) (MH)

2.0201.2 (c) Health & Safety - Combustion Safety General - Combustion Safety - Make-up Air - CO detection and warning equipment (SF) (MH)

Deferral Requirements:

2.0203 Electric Space Heaters

Action/Allowability:

Testing:

Client Education:

2.0204 Fireplaces - Special Considerations

Fireplaces present special hazards that are affected by weatherization. If draft is poor, smoke may downdraft into living space causing poor indoor air quality, which can be appropriately ventilated by the client. However, near the end of a wood fire glowing coals remain, radiating heat; while the draft lowers and allows the top of the chimney to cool, further reducing draft. The reduced draft also reduces oxygen available to glowing coals causing production of CO without the smoke that encourages appropriate space ventilation. This creates a dangerous situation as the CO enters the living space due to the lowered draft, causing drowsiness, and sometimes more dangerous situations for the occupants.

Action/Allowability:

Inspecting/Evaluating/Testing:

Inspection

Evaluating

Cross-sectional areas of round, square and rectangular flue sizes are provided in the following tables.

Net Cross-sectional Area of Round Flue Sizes
Flue Size,
Inside Diameter
(Inches)
Cross-sectional
Area
(square inches)
6 28
7 38
8 50
10 78
10.75 90
12 113
15 176
18 254
Net Cross-sectional Area of Square and Rectangular Flue Sizes
Flue Size,
Outside
Nominal Dimensions
(Inches)
Cross-sectional Area
(square inches)
4.5 X 8.5 23
4.5 X 13 34
8 X 8 42
8.5 X 8.5 49
8 X 12 67
8.5 X 13 76
12 X 12 102
8.5 X 18 101
13 X 13 127
12 X 16 131
13 X 18 173
16 X 16 181
16 X 20 222
18 X 18 233
20 X 20 298
20 X 24 335
24 X 24 431

Testing:

Gas Fireplaces:

Gas Stoves:

Wood Fireplaces and Pellet Stoves:

Weatherized homes containing wood, gas or pellet fireplaces and/or stoves:

Client Education:

2.0103.1 (b) Health & Safety - Safe Work Practices - Heating and Cooling Equipment - Carbon Monoxide (SF)

2.0205 Manufactured Homes - Special Considerations

Manufactured Home Construction Safety Standards require all fuel-burning, heat producing appliances, except ranges and ovens, to be vented to the outside. All fuel burning appliances in manufactured homes (excluding ranges, ovens, illuminating appliances, clothes dryers, solid fuel-burning fireplaces and solid fuel-burning stoves) must be installed to provide separation of the combustion system from the interior atmosphere of the home (i.e. to draw their combustion air from the outside).

Action/Allowability:

Testing:

Client Education:

2.0206 Masonry Chimneys

Masonry chimneys used by vented space heaters should be properly lined in compliance with the International Fuel Gas Code (IFGC). When NeWAP installs new equipment the installation must meet all local and state code requirements.

Masonry chimneys that have been retired (i.e. not being use by existing equipment) should be assessed for energy saving opportunities such as infiltration reduction, air sealing and capping to reduce thermal bypass.

2.0207 Solid-Fuel Space Heaters

Space heaters are self-contained devices that are generally used for heating a specific area. These types of heating devices are often associated with fires and carbon monoxide poisoning risks. Solid fueled space heaters including wood stoves, coal stoves, pellet stoves, and fireplaces and wood, coal, and pellet fired furnace and boiler systems are considered by DOE to be vented heating systems.

Action/Allowability:

Client Education:

2.0208 Unvented Gas - and Liquid-Fueled Space Heaters

Action/Allowability:

Primary Heat Sources:

Secondary Heat Sources:

Testing:

Client Education:

2.0202.1 (a, b) Health & Safety - Combustion Safety - Unvented Space Heaters - Unvented Space Heaters: Propane, Natural Gas, and Kerosene Heaters (SF) (MH)

2.0209 Vented Gas- and Liquid-Fueled Space Heaters

Treat vented gas- and liquid-fueled space heaters the same as furnaces in terms of combustion safety testing, repair and replacement. This policy applies to vented space heaters fueled by natural gas, propane, or oil. Venting should be tested consistent with furnaces.

2.03 Carbon Monoxide Testing, Inspection, Verification, and Documentation

Carbon Monoxide (CO) is released by combustion appliances, automobiles, and cigarettes as a product of incomplete combustion. CO is normally tested in the flue of vented appliances and is usually caused by one of the following:

Action/Allowability:

Client Education:

2.0103.1 (b) Health & Safety - Safe Work Practices - Heating and Cooling Equipment - Carbon Monoxide (SF) (MH)

2.0301.1 (a) Health & Safety - Safety Devices - Combustion Safety Devices - Smoke Alarm (SF) (MH)

2.0301.2 (a, b) Health & Safety - Safety Devices - Combustion Safety Devices - Carbon Monoxide Alarm or Monitor (SF) (MH)

2.04 System Safety Testing, Inspection, Verification, and Documentation

2.0401 Combustion Appliance Testing

Action/Allowability:

2.0203.2 (a, b, c, d, e) Health & Safety - Combustion Safety - Vented Gas Appliances - Combustion Flue Gas - Orphaned Water Heaters (SF)

2.0202.1 (a, b) Health & Safety - Combustion Safety - Unvented Space Heaters - Unvented Space Heaters: Propane, Natural Gas, and Kerosene Heaters (SF) (MH)

2.0202.1 (a, b) Health & Safety - Combustion Safety - Unvented Space Heaters - Unvented Space Heaters: Propane, Natural Gas, and Kerosene Heaters (SF) (MH)

2.0203.1 (a, b, c) Health & Safety - Combustion Safety - Vented Gas Appliances - Combustion Air for Natural Draft Appliances (SF) (MH)

Testing:

Client Education:

2.0103.1 (b) Health & Safety - Safe Work Practices - Heating and Cooling Equipment - Carbon Monoxide (SF) (MH)

2.0301.1 (b) Health & Safety - Combustion Safety Devices - Smoke Alarm (SF) (MH)

2.0301.2 (a, b) Health & Safety - Combustion Safety Devices - Carbon Monoxide Alarm or Monitor (SF) (MH)

2.0402 Leak Testing Gas Appliances and Piping

Action/Allowability:

2.0103.1 (a, b, c) Health & Safety - Safe Work Practices- Heating and Cooling Equipment - Combustion Worker Safety (SF) (MH)

Testing:

2.0201.1 (b) Health & Safety - Combustion Safety - Combustion Safety Testing - General - Combustion Appliance Zone (CAZ) Testing - Fuel Leak Detection (SF) (MH)

2.0403 Verify the BTU Input on Natural Gas Appliances by Clocking (timing) the Gas Meter

Action/Allowability:

If the measured input is still out of range, the tech should recommend the system be inspected by the gas supplier.

2.0404 Complete Initial Inspection of the Heating System:

Action/Allowability:

5.3003.9 (a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h, i, j, k, m, n) Heating and Cooling - Forced Air - System Assessment & Maintenance - Heating and Cooling Controls (SF)

5.3003.4 (a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h) Heating and Cooling - Forced Air - System Assessment & Maintenance - Evaluating Electrical Service (SF)

Testing:

2.0405 Verify, Assess and Document Adequate Combustion Air Supply for All Combustion Zones

Combustion appliances required oxygen or combustion air to operate and some appliances draw combustion air from inside the home or building envelope. Completing an assessment on each combustion appliance in a home ensures that a combustion air problem does not interfere with combustion, create carbon monoxide or contribute to spillage or backdrafting. Combustion appliance zones are classified as either un-confined spaces or confined spaces.

2.0203.1 (a, b, c) Health & Safety - Combustion Safety - Vented Gas Appliances - Combustion Air for Natural Draft Appliances (SF) (MH)

Action/Allowability:

Manufactured housing specific work standards:

2.0406 Complete Combustion Appliance Zone (CAZ) Testing

Action/Allowability:

Testing:

CAZ testing must include, but not be limited to:

2.0201.1 (a, b, c, d, e) Health & Safety - Combustion Safety - Combustion Safety General - Combustion Appliance Zone (CAZ) Testing (SF) (MH)

2.0407 Inspecting and Testing Gas Ranges and Ovens

Action/Allowability:

Testing:

Client Education:

2.0201.2 (d, e) Health & Safety - Combustion Safety General - Combustion Safety - Make-up Air - Gas Ovens & Gas Range Burners (SF) (MH)

2.0408 Inspecting and Testing Vented Gas Appliances

Action/Allowability:

2.07 Occupant Education and Access

2.0701 Basements and Crawl Spaces

2.0701.2 (a, b, c) Health & Safety - Occupant Education and Access - Basement and Crawl Spaces - Crawl Space Information Sign (SF)

2.0701.3 (a, b, c) Health & Safety - Occupant Education and Access - Basement and Crawl Spaces - Crawl Space - Occupant Education (SF)

2.08 DOE Health & Safety Program Guidance Requirements

2.0801 Air Conditioning and Heating Systems /Units

Action/Allowability:

When a space conditioning system does not qualify as an ECM, the following conditions must be met before the unit can be replaced or repaired with Health and Safety funds:

Testing:

Client Education:

Training:

Asbestos

WAP staff members often encounter asbestos. Asbestos sources include, but are not limited to:

NeWAP subgrantees must follow these Health & Safety - Safe Work Practices:

2.0100.1 (o) Health & Safety - Safe Work Practices - Global Worker Safety - Asbestos - Containing Materials (SF) (MH)

2.0102.1 (b) Health & Safety - Safe Work Practices - Insulation - Insulation Worker Safety (SF) (MH)

2.0802 Asbestos - in Siding, Walls, Ceilings, etc.

When asbestos siding is present it may be removed and replaced, but it must not be cut, sanded, or drilled.

Action/Allowability:

NeWAP Subgrantees must take all reasonable and necessary precautions to prevent asbestos contamination in the home, including but not limited to:

Testing:

Client Education:

Training:

2.0803 Asbestos in Vermiculite

Action/Allowability:

NeWAP Subgrantees must take all reasonable and necessary precautions to prevent asbestos contamination in the home, including but not limited to:

Testing:

Client Education:

Training:

2.0804 Asbestos on Pipes, Furnaces, other Small Covered Surfaces

Action/Allowability:

NeWAP Subgrantees must take all reasonable and necessary precautions to prevent asbestos contamination in the home including but not limited to:

Testing:

Client Education:

Training:

2.0805 Biological and Unsanitary Conditions - Odors, Bacteria, Viruses, Raw Sewage, Rotting Wood, etc.

Action/Allowability:

Testing:

Client Education:

Training:

2.0806 Building Structure and Roofing

Program workers frequently encounter homes in poor structural condition; however building rehabilitation is beyond the scope of the Weatherization Assistance Program. Weatherization services may be delayed until the dwelling can be made safe for crews and occupants. Incidental repairs necessary for the effective performance or preservation of weatherization materials are allowed.

Action/Allowability:

Testing:

Client Education:

Training:

2.0807 Code Compliance

The Nebraska Weatherization Program does not fund the costs of bringing homes "up to" the latest building code requirements. However, any eligible energy efficiency work that is completed as part of the weatherization work must meet all state and local building code requirements.

Action/Allowability:

Testing:

Client Education:

Training:

2.0808 Combustion Gases

Action/Allowability:

Testing:

Client Education:

Training:

2.0809 Electrical

Electrical Issues:

The two primary energy-related Health & Safety electrical concerns associated with weatherization work are insulating homes that contain knob-and-tube wiring and identifying overloaded electrical. Electrical safety is a basic need that impacts home weatherization and repair.

Action/Allowability:

Knob-and-Tube Wiring in Attics:

4.1001.2 (a, b, c) Insulation - Attics - General Preparation - Knob and Tube Wiring (SF)

2.0601.1 (a, b, c, d) Health & Safety - Electrical - Knob & Tube Wiring (SF)

Knob-and-Tube Wiring in Sidewalls:

Overloaded Electrical, Fuses and Splices:

Wire Gauge Fuse Size
12 gauge wire 20 amp fuse
14 gauge wire 15 amp fuse

2.0105.1 (a) Health & Safety - Safe Work Practices - Baseload - Baseload Worker Safety (SF) (MH)

2.0602.1 (a, b) Health & Safety - Electrical - Electric Hazards - Static Electric Shock (SF) (MH)

Testing:

Client Education:

Training:

2.0810 Formaldehyde, Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), and other Air Pollutants

Action/Allowability:

Testing:

Client Education:

Training:

2.0811 Fuel Leaks

Action/Allowability:

Testing:

Client Education:

Training:

2.0812 Gas Ovens/Stovetops/Ranges

Testing:

Client Education:

2.0100.1 (e) Health & Safety - Safe Work Practices - Global Worker Safety - Carbon Monoxide (SF) (MH)

2.0201.2 (d, e) Health & Safety - Combustion Safety General - Combustion Safety Make-up Air - Gas Ovens & Gas Range Burners (SF) (MH)

Training:

2.0813 Hazardous Materials Disposal - Refrigerant, Asbestos, Lead, Mercury, including CFLs/Fluorescents

Action/Allowability:

Testing:

Client Education:

Training:

2.0814 Injury Prevention of Occupants and Weatherization Workers - Repairing Stairs, Replacing Handrails, etc.

Weatherization staff must not work in unsafe and/or excessively unsanitary conditions. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standards, Construction Trade Safety Standards, as well as company safety standards must be observed by everyone in the NeWAP.

Action/Allowability:

Testing:

Client Education:

Training:

2.0815 Lead Based Paint

On April 10, 2010, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) "Lead; Renovation, Repair and Painting Program" (LRRPP) Final Rule became effective in the Weatherization Program. By adopting basic safety precautions workers and the occupants of the homes they weatherize will be protected from lead exposure. The U.S. Department of Energy requires subgrantees to follow specified EPA and Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standards for worker safety.

Action/Allowability:

Testing:

Client Education:

Training Requirements:

2.0816 Mold and Moisture - Including but not limited to: gutters, down spouts, extensions, flashing, leaking roofs, vapor retarders, moisture barriers, etc.

Water moves easily as a liquid or vapor from the ground through porous building materials like concrete and wood. A high groundwater table can channel moisture into a home. The most common ground-moisture source is water vapor rising through the soil or liquid water moving up through the soil by capillary action. To prevent this, all crawl spaces should have ground moisture barriers. Install or improve air barriers and vapor barriers to prevent air leakage and vapor diffusion from transporting moisture into building cavities.

Adding insulation to the walls, floor, and ceiling of a home will keep the indoor surfaces warmer and less prone to condensation. During cold weather, well-insulated homes can tolerate higher humidity without condensation than can greatly impact poorly insulated homes.

Alleviating drainage and major drainage issues are beyond the scope of the Nebraska WAP, however the following issues should be considered during the initial inspection and implementation of the work if drainage issues are encountered and presented to the client or home owner:

Action/Allowability:

2.0401.1 (a, b, c, d) Health & Safety - Moisture - Air Sealing - Air Sealing Moisture Precautions (SF) (MH)

2.0403.1 (a, b, c, d, e) Health & Safety - Moisture - Vapor Barriers - Vented Crawl Spaces - Ground Moisture Barriers (SF)

2.0403.2 (a, b, c, d, e, f) Health & Safety - Moisture - Vapor Barriers - Closed Crawl Spaces - Ground Moisture Barriers (SF)

Testing:

Client Education:

Training:

2.0401.1 (a, b, c, d) Health & Safety - Moisture - Air Sealing - Air Sealing Moisture Precautions (SF)

2.0403.1 (a, b, c, d, e) Health & Safety - Moisture - Vapor Barriers - Vented Crawl Spaces - Ground Moisture Barriers (SF)

2.0403.2 (a, b, c, d, e, f) Health & Safety - Moisture - Vapor Barriers - Closed Crawl Spaces - Ground Moisture Barriers (SF)

2.0701.1 (a, b) Health & Safety - Occupant Education and Access - Basements and Crawl Spaces - Crawl Spaces - Providing Access (SF)

2.0817 Occupant Pre-Existing or Potential Health Conditions

All products used in Weatherization Services must be approved by the U.S. Department of Energy. Some products used may have an odor (Volatile Organic Compound or VOC) that some people may find objectionable or to which some people may experience sensitivity. If any family member or a subgrantee believes that someone in the home may be hypersensitive to, or may otherwise object to the use in the home of any of the common weatherization building material, the issue must be documented and resolved prior to the start on the work.

Action/Allowability:

Testing:

Client Education:

Training:

2.0818 Pests

Action/Allowability:

Testing:

Client Education:

Training:

2.0819 Radon

Radon is a natural radioactive gas found in areas of Nebraska. Radon can't be seen, smelled or tasted and has been linked to certain types of cancers.

Action/Accountability:

Testing:

Client Education:

Training:

2.0820 Safety Devices: Smoke, Carbon Monoxide Detectors, Fire Extinguishers

Action/Allowability:

2.0301.1 (b) Health & Safety - Safety Devices - Combustion Safety Devices - Smoke Alarm (SF) (MH)

2.0301.2 (a, b) Health & Safety - Safety Devices - Combustion Safety Devices - Carbon Monoxide Alarm or Monitor (SF) (MH)

Testing:

Client Education:

2.0100.1 (e) Health & Safety - Safe Work Practices - Global Worker Safety - Carbon Monoxide (SF) (MH)

2.0201.2 (c, d, e) Health & Safety - Combustion Safety - Combustion Safety Make-up Air (SF) (MH)

Training:

2.0821 Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality

Ventilation is an important health and safety concern in homes where the blower door reading is low.

2.0104.1 (a) Health & Safety - Safe Work Practices - Ventilation Equipment - Ventilation Worker Safety (SF) (MH)

Action/Allowability:

Testing:

Client Education:

Training:

2.0822 Window and Door Replacement, Window Guards

General Information:

Testing:

Client Education:

Training:

2.0823 Worker Safety

Action/Allowability:

Testing:

Client Education:

Training:

3 Air Sealing

Air infiltration can account for 30 percent or more of a home's heating and cooling costs and can contribute to additional problems with moisture, noise, dust, indoor air quality, and pests. Appropriate air sealing can reduce infiltration significantly to reduce heating and cooling costs, improve building durability and longevity, and create a healthier indoor environment.

3.01 Identify the Air and Thermal Boundaries of the Building Envelope

To complete appropriate air sealing you must identify the location of both the air and the thermal boundaries of the home. Generally, ceilings, walls, and floor/foundation separate the inside conditioned space from the outside or unconditioned space forming both the air barrier and the thermal barrier for the house, but that is not always the case.

For example, the thermal boundary of a home's crawl space may be insulation located in the floor cavities while the foundation walls actually provide the air barrier. A visual inspection is used to verify the thermal barrier while blower door testing of the pressure planes within the home is one of the most accurate ways of identifying the air boundaries of a home.

3.02 Blower Door Testing

Blower door testing is used to determine the overall air tightness of a home. Appropriate testing can help you to locate leaks, determine approximately how big the leaks are, and whether the leaks are located in areas that may significantly impact the indoor air quality of the home and the health of its residents. Pre- and post-weatherization blower door testing must be completed on all homes weatherized through the NeWAP. Documentation of the test results must be appropriately included in all client files.

2.0101.1 (a) Health & Safety - Safe Work Practices - Air Sealing - Air Sealing Worker Safety (SF) (MH)

Air Sealing is most effective when completed in conjunction with the blower door. Utilizing blower door guided air sealing allows you to locate and seal the largest sources of leakage and helps you to determine the effectiveness of your sealing work by providing an instantaneous reduction in the home's CFM50 Reading. The CFM50 reduction should be checked at the end of each air sealing measure or step completed to determine cost effectiveness. As the air sealing work progresses the amount of CFM reduction experienced diminishes, you are able to determine the point where continued air sealing is no longer cost-effective.

Cost Effective Blower Door Guided Air Sealing is air sealing guided by calculating effectiveness after each round of infiltration repair work completed. Dividing the labor and material costs incurred by the CFM50 Reduction gives dollar/CFM50 savings ratio. As long as the dollar/CFM50 savings ratio is less than $50.00 per 100 CFM, continue looking for air sealing opportunities. If the dollar/CFM50 Ratio is greater than $50.00 per 100 CFM, stop air sealing.

Example process for
Cost Effective Blower Door Guided Air Sealing:
First Blower Door reading: 5500 CFM50
Air Sealing Work Done: Close opening above and around interior pocket door and hole in the wall behind the kitchen range
Materials Used: 1/2 sheet of dry wall, 1/4 roll R-11 batt, 2 tubes caulking, drywall tape, mud and screws.
Labor Cost: 2.5 hours at $25.00 = $62.50
Material Cost: $63.00
Total: $125.50
Second Blower Door reading: 4100 CFM50 - A reduction of 1400 CFM
Savings ratio: $125.50 ÷ 1400 x 100 =$8.96 per 100 CFM
The ratio is less than $50 per 100 CFM. Keep looking for air sealing opportunities.
Second Blower Door reading: 4100 CFM50
Air Sealing Work Done: Seal around furnace flue and fire place chimney (at attic insulation line)
Materials Used: 10 sf tin, 6 tubes of high temp caulk, screws, and 1 small "L" bracket to secure tin to masonry chimney
Labor Cost: 3 hours at $25.00 = $75.00
Material Cost: $140.00
Total: $215.00
Third Blower Door reading: 3450 CFM50 a reduction of 650 CFM
Saving ratio: $215.00 ÷ 650 CFM x 100 = $33.07 per 100 CFM
The ratio is less than $50.00 per 100 CFM. Keep looking for air sealing opportunities.
Third Blower Door reading: 3450 CFM50
Air Sealing Work Done: Caulk interior window and door trim, install window rope pulley covers, caulk attic access trim
Labor Cost: 2-1/2 hours at $25.00 = $62.50
Material Cost: 11 tubes of caulking @ $4.50, 20 pulley covers @ $3.50, and 25 feet backer rod @ $1.00 total materials cost $123.50
Total: $186.00
Fourth Blower Door reading: 2700 CFM50 a reduction of 750 CFM
Saving ratio: $186.00 ÷ 750 CFM x 100 = $24.80 per 100 CFM
The ratio is less than $50.00 per 100 CFM. Keep looking for air sealing opportunities.
Fourth Blower Door reading: 2700 CFM50
Air Sealing Work Done: Seal rim joist and seal unused coal chute.
Labor Cost: 2 hours at $35.00 = $70.00
Material Cost: 13 tubes of caulking @ $4.50, 20 feet of backer rod @ $1.50 = total materials $88.50
Total Measure Cost: $158.50
Fifth Blower Door reading: 2400 CFM a reduction of 300 CFM
Savings ratio: $158.50 ÷ 300 CFM x 100 = $52.80 per 100 CFM
The ratio is more than $50 per 100 CFM. Stop air sealing.

NeWAP only provides the $/CFM reduction reimbursement of the costs directly associated with blower door air sealing not with other energy savings measures (i.e. window replacements, attic insulations). Payment for blower door air sealing requires documentation verifying the infiltration reduction costs being reimbursed are directly associated with blower door guided air sealing.

3.03 Primary Air Sealing Guidelines/Requirements

Seal the largest openings first progressively working to the smaller openings. Stack effect makes it most effective to start air sealing at the top of the structure and work your way down to the lower areas of the home. The following areas/building areas provide special sealing challenges and should always checked in your air sealing process:

3.1001.2 (a, b, c, d, e, f) Air Sealing - Attics - Penetrations and Chases - Chase Capping (SF)

3.1001.2 (a, b, c, d, e, f) Air Sealing – Attics – Penetrations and Chases - Chase Capping (SF)

3.1001.3 (a, b, c, d, e) Air Sealing - Attics - Penetrations and Chases - Walls Open to Attic - Balloon Framing and Double Walls (SF)

3.1201.4 (a, b) Air Sealing - Windows and Doors - Maintenance, Repair, and Sealing - Pocket Door (SF)

3.1003.1 (a, b, c, d, e) Air Sealing - Attics - Dropped Ceilings and Soffits - New Ceiling Below Original - Old Ceiling Intact or repairable (SF)

3.1003.2 (a, b, c, d, e) Air Sealing - Attics - Dropped Ceilings and Soffits - Ceiling Leaks Not Repairable - No Air Barrier Above (SF)

3.1003.4 (a, b, c, d, e) Air Sealing - Attics - Dropped Ceilings and Soffits - Dropped Ceilings (SF)

3.1003.5 (a, b, c) Air Sealing - Attics - Dropped Ceilings and Soffits - Dropped Ceilings with Light Boxes and Fixtures (SF)

3.1003.6 (a, b, c, d, e) Air Sealing - Attics - Dropped Ceilings and Soffits - Dropped Soffits (SF)

3.1003.3 (a, b, c, d, e) Air Sealing - Attics - Dropped Ceilings - Above Closets and Tubs (SF)

3.1402.1 (a, b, c) Air Sealing - Basements and Crawl Spaces - Basements Connected to Crawl Spaces - Sealing and Insulating - High Temperature Application (SF)

3.1601.1 (h, i) Air Sealing - Ducts - Duct Preparation - Boot to Wood and Boot to Gypsum (SF)

3.1001.2 (c, d) Air Sealing - Attics - Penetrations and Chases - Chase Capping - Non-standard chase (interior walls covered with wood or paneling) and Support (SF)

3.1004.1 (a, b, c) Air Sealing - Attics - Cathedralized Attic Ceilings - Cathedralized Attic Air Sealing (Insulation Installed at roof Deck) (SF)

3.1005.1 (a, b, c) Air Sealing - Attics - Other Ceiling Materials - Tongue and Grove Ceilings (SF)

3.1402.3 (a, b) Air Sealing - Basements and Crawl Spaces - Closed Crawl Spaces - Air Sealing Exterior Wall (SF)

3.1501.1 (a, b, c, d, e, f, g) Air Sealing - Attached Garages - Penetrations, Cracks, and Doors Between Garage and House (SF)

3.04 Secondary Air Sealing Guidelines / Requirements

Should be completed following the implementation of the Audit recommended Energy Efficiency Measures. As with primary air sealing, seal the largest leaks and work your way down to the smaller leaks. And due to stack effect, it is also most beneficial to start sealing at the highest level of the home and work your way down. Common secondary air sealing Measures include but are not limited to:

3.1201.3 (a, b, c, d, e) Air Sealing - Windows and Doors - Maintenance, Repair, and Sealing - Exterior Doors (SF)

3.1201.1 (a, b, c, d, e, f, g) Air Sealing - Windows and Doors - Maintenance, Repair, and Sealing - Double-Hung Wood Windows (SF)

3.1201.2 (a, b, c, d, e) Air Sealing - Windows and Doors - Maintenance, Repair, and Sealing - Single-Unit Window and Fixed Frame with Wood Sash (SF)

3.1202.1 (a, b, c, d) Air Sealing - Windows and Doors - Maintenance, Repair, and Sealing - Fixed Frame with Wood Sash - Older House (SF)

3.1202.2 (a, b, c, d) Air Sealing - Windows and Doors - Maintenance, Repair, and Sealing - Single-Unit Window, Mounted on Rough Opening - Newer House (SF)

3.05 Minor Air Sealing Requirements

Interior joints may be caulked if blower door testing indicates substantial leakage. These joints include where baseboard, crown molding and/or casing meet the wall/ceiling/floor surfaces. Gaps around surface-mounted or recessed light fixtures and ventilation fans should also be caulked if appropriate.

3.1402.1 (a, b, c) Air Sealing - Basements and Crawl Spaces - Crawl Spaces - Sealing Floor Penetrations (SF)

Subgrantees must complete all cost-effective air sealing opportunities and all project files must provide clear and adequate documentation of the installer's efforts to appropriately air seal the home.

Air Sealing Material Standards installed through the NeWAP must form a permanent and airtight seal, must match the existing surfaces as closely as possible, and meet the following requirements:

Manufactured Housing Air Sealing requirements:

3.06 Air Sealing Exceptions

Some dwellings may not reach the air sealing standards because of structural conditions or other factors. Exceptions are allowed when:

Subgrantees must complete all cost-effective air sealing opportunities and all project files must provide clear and adequate documentation of the installer's efforts to appropriately air seal the home.

3.12 Windows and Doors

Window and door replacements can sometimes be replaced based on energy savings, generally replacement is not a cost-effective measure through the NeWAP. However replacements may be completed if the unit(s) is appropriately documented in the client file as "beyond repair". The NeWAP does cover costs associated with cost-effective repair and air sealing work on exterior doors, exterior windows, storm doors and storm windows.

3.1201 Maintenance, Repair, and Sealing

All work related to window and door repair/replacement must be completed using lead-safe weatherization practices.

3.1201.1 (a) Air Sealing - Windows & Doors - Maintenance, Repair, and Sealing - Double-Hung Wood Windows - Lead Paint Assessment (SF)

3.1201.2 (a) Air Sealing - Windows & Doors - Maintenance, Repair, and Sealing - Single-Unit Window and Fixed Frame with Wood Sash - Lead Paint Assessment (SF)

3.1202.1 (a) Air Sealing - Windows & Doors - Repairing/Replacing Cracked & Broken Glass - Fixed Frame with Wood Sash - Older House - Lead Paint Assessment (SF)

3.1202.2 (a) Air Sealing - Windows & Doors - Repairing/Replacing Cracked & Broken Glass - Single-Unit Window, Mounted on Rough Opening - Newer House - Lead Paint Assessment (SF)

3.1203.1 (a, b, c, d, e) Air Sealing - Windows and Doors - Replacement - Replacement Windows in Existing Frame - Lead Paint Assessment (SF)

3.1203.2 (a, b, c, d, e, f) Air Sealing - Windows and Doors - Replacement - Single-Unit Window, Mounted on Rough Opening - Newer House - Lead Paint Assessment (SF)

3.1202 Window and Door Repairing/Replacing Cracked and Broken Glass

Window replacements completed through the NeWAP must be shown as cost-effective through the home's Energy Audit, unless the unit(s) is documented in the client file as beyond repair. However windows in many homes are a major source of air leakage, therefore repair and air sealing work on exterior and storm windows is an eligible expenditure.

This work includes, but is not limited to:

3.1202.1 (a, b, c, d) Air Sealing - Windows and Doors - Replacement - Replacement Window in Existing Window Frame Air Sealing - \ Windows and Doors - Repairing/Replacing Cracked & Broken Glass - Fixed Frame with Wood Sash - Older House (SF)

3.1202.2 (a, b, c, d) Air Sealing - Windows and Doors - Repairing/Replacing Cracked & Broken Glass - Single-Unit Window, Mounted on Rough Opening - Newer House (SF)

3.1201.1 (d) Air Sealing - Windows and Doors - Maintenance, Repair, and Sealing - Double-Hung Wood Windows - Replacement Sills (SF)

3.1201.1 (e) Air Sealing - Windows & Doors - Maintenance, Repair, and Sealing - Double-Hung Wood Windows - Sash replacement (SF)

3.1201.1 (f) Air Sealing - Windows and Doors - Maintenance, Repair, and Sealing - Double-Hung Wood Windows - Adjust stops (SF)

3.1201.1 (b) Air Sealing - Windows and Doors - Replacement - Replacement Window in Existing Window Frame - Weather-stripping (SF)

Door Repair and Air Sealing

Door replacements can sometimes be replaced based on energy savings; generally replacement is not a cost-effective measure through the NeWAP. Replace doors only when the replacement provides an SIR of 1.0 or the door is damaged beyond repair and its condition has been appropriately documented. However doors in many homes are a major source of air leakage, therefore repair and air sealing work on exterior doors is an eligible expenditure. This work includes, but is not limited to:

3.1201.3 (b) Air Sealing - Windows and Doors - Maintenance, Repair, and Sealing - Exterior Doors - Door operation and fit (SF)

3.1201.3 (c, d) Air Sealing - Windows and Doors - Maintenance, Repair, and Sealing - Exterior Doors (SF)

3.1201.3 (a) Air Sealing - Windows and Doors - Maintenance, Repair, and Sealing - Exterior Doors - Lead Paint Assessment (SF)

3.1203 Window and Door Replacement Requirements

Window Replacement Requirements

Window can sometimes be replaced based on energy savings, generally replacement is not a cost-effective measure through the NeWAP. Replace windows only when the window achieves an SIR of 1.0 or better when evaluated under the "Evaluate All" Replacement Option or the when the window is damaged beyond repair and its condition has been appropriately documented. Windows replaced through the NeWAP in framed or modular homes, or multifamily buildings must have:

3.1201.1 (a, b, c, d, e) Air Sealing - Windows and Doors - Replacement - Replacement Window in Existing Window Frame (SF)

3.1201.2 (a, b, c, d, e, f) Air Sealing - Windows and Doors - Replacement - Single-Unit Window, Mounted on Rough Opening - Newer House (SF)

Windows replaced in manufactured homes through the NeWAP must have:

Storm Window and Screen Repair and Replacement

Storm window and screen replacements are generally not cost-effective energy conservation measures. Replace storm windows only if they are indicated as cost-effective by achieving an SIR of 1.0 or better when evaluated under the "Evaluate All" replacement Option.

Storm windows replaced through the NeWAP in manufactured homes must have:

Door Replacement

Door replacements can sometimes be replaced based on energy savings; generally replacement is not a cost-effective measure through the NeWAP. Replace doors only when the replacement provides an SIR of 1.0 or the door is damaged beyond repair and its condition has been appropriately documented. Exterior doors replaced through the NeWAP single family homes or multi-family buildings must have:

3.1201.3 (a, b, c, d, e) Air Sealing - Windows and Doors - Maintenance, Repair, and Sealing - Exterior Doors (SF)

Exterior doors replaced through the NeWAP in manufactured homes must have:

Below and Grade Level doors replaced through the NeWAP in single family, manufactured housing, or multi-family buildings must:

3.13 Floors

Air sealing floors separates the inside conditioned space from the outside or unconditioned space forming an appropriate air barrier. The following standards must be followed when NeWAP subgrantees air sealing penetrations in floors:

3.14 Basements and Crawl Spaces

Air sealing basements and crawl spaces separates the inside conditioned space from the outside or unconditioned space forming an appropriate air barrier. The following standards must be followed when NeWAP subgrantees air sealing penetrations in basements and crawl spaces or when the following special conditions are encountered:

3.1401 Basements Connected to Crawl Spaces or Ledged Basements

3.1401.1 (a, b, c, d) Air Sealing - Basements and Crawl Spaces - Basements Connected to Crawl Spaces - Sealing and Insulating (SF)

3.1402 Crawl Spaces

3.1402.2 (a) Air Sealing - Basements and Crawl Spaces - Crawl Spaces - Closed Crawl Spaces - Air Sealing Foundation Vents (SF)

3.1402.3 (a, b) Air Sealing - Basements and Crawl Spaces - Crawl Spaces - Closed Crawl Spaces - Air Sealing Exterior Wall (SF)

3.1402.4 (a, b) Air Sealing - Basements and Crawl Spaces - Crawl Spaces - Closed Crawl Spaces - Air Sealing Brick Curtain Walls with Piers (SF)

3.1402.5 (a, b) Air Sealing - Basements and Crawl Spaces - Crawl Spaces - Closed Crawl Spaces - Attached Crawl Spaces Under Unconditioned Spaces (SF)

3.1488 Special Considerations

3.1488.1 (a, b, c) Air Sealing - Basements and Crawl Spaces - Special Considerations - Skirting Post and Pier Foundations (SF)

Insulated Skirting Installation Requirements

If underbellies or exposed floors are un-insulated and inaccessible, insulated skirting may be installed if it is determined in the Energy Audit to be cost-effective.

3.1488.1 (a, b, c) Air Sealing - Basements and Crawl Spaces - Special Considerations - Skirting Post and Pier Foundations (SF)

3.16 Ducts

Sealing, repairing and insulating existing accessible ductwork provides Nebraska Weatherization Assistance Program (NeWAP) clients with energy cost reductions and improved comfort. Sealing leaky ducts also help to improve indoor air quality.

3.1601 Duct Preparation

Prior to sealing and/or insulating ducts NeWAP subgrantees must:

3.1601.1 (a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h, i, j) Ducts - Duct Preparation - Preparation and Mechanical Fastening (SF)

3.1601.2 (a, b) Ducts - Duct Preparation - Preparation for SPF Application (SF) (MH)

3.1601.3 (a) Ducts - Duct Preparation - Support (SF)

Prior to sealing and/or insulating ducts NeWAP subgrantees must verify and make reasonable attempts to ensure that duct systems are providing balanced, adequate airflow to living spaces. When airflow is a problem subgrantees must consider the following options:

3.1602.4 (a, b, c, d) Ducts - Duct Sealing - Air Sealing System Components (SF)

3.1602 Duct Sealing

Duct Sealing

Manufactured housing specific work standards

3.1602.4 (a, b, c, d) Ducts - Duct Sealing - Air Sealing System Components (SF)

3.1602.1 (a, b, c) Ducts - Duct Sealing - Air Sealing Duct System (SF)

3.1602.2 (a) Ducts - Duct Sealing - Duct Spray Polyurethane Foam (SPF) Installation (SF) (MH)

3.1602.5 (a, b, c) Ducts - Duct Sealing - Return-Framed Platform (SF)

3.1602.7 (a, b) Ducts - Duct Sealing - Return and Supply Plenums in Basements and Crawl Spaces (SF)

3.17 Additions

The following standards must be followed when NeWAP subgrantees air seal additions attached to manufactured housing:

4 Insulation

Appropriate installation is required for insulation to provide energy savings and increase occupant comfort. The insulation must be installed:

Fiberglass batt insulation installed in a living area must be covered with paneling, plywood, chipboard, hardboard or drywall, with the exception of sill box insulation. If the installed covering is:

4.10 Attics

4.1001 General Preparation

Prior to installing attic insulation subgrantees must inspect for, prepare for and document the following issues/concerns:

Air Sealing

4.1001.6 (a, b, c, d) Insulation - Attics - General Preparation - Unvented Roof Deck - Preparation for Spray Polyurethane Foam (SF)

4.1001.7 (a, b, c, d) Insulation - Attics - General Preparation - Vented Roof Deck - Preparation for SPF (SF)

4.9901.1 (a, b, c) Insulation - Additional resources - Materials - General Information on Spray Polyurethane Foam (SPF) (SF) (MH)

Knob & Tube Wiring

4.1001.2 (a, b, c) Insulation - Attics - General Preparation - Knob and Tube Wiring (SF)

Knob and tube critical wiring points
Knob and tube critical wiring points
Detail A
Detail A
Detail B
Detail B
Detail C
Detail C

Once the determination of the wire locations is documented in the client file, the wiring may be appropriately shielded as indicated above to prevent direct contact with the additional insulation and to provide adequate air movement space for cooling of the wire. Following appropriate shielding, insulation may be installed over the shielding.

Recessed Lighting

4.1001.1 (a, b, c, d) Insulation - Attics - General Preparation - Non-Insulation Contact (IC) Recessed Light (SF)

Shielding, Damming and Junction Boxes

4.1001.3 (a, b, c, d) Insulation - Attics - General Preparation - Fireplace Chimney and Combustion Flue Vents (SF)

Manufactured housing specific work standards

4.1001.4 (a) Insulation - Attics - General Preparation - Venting Eave of Soffit Baffles (SF)

4.1001.5 (a) Insulation - Attics - General Preparation - Dense Pack Preparation (SF)

Attic Accesses and Hatch Standards

4.1006.2 (a, b, c, e) Insulation - Attics - Attic Openings - Access Doors and Hatches (SF)

Special Considerations

Worker and Client Safety

2.0102.1 (a, b, c, d) Health & Safety - Safe Work Practices - Insulation - Insulation Worker Safety (SF) (MH)

2.0401.1 (a) Health & Safety - Moisture- Air Sealing - Air Sealing Moisture Problems (SF) (MH)

Ventilation/Attic Ventilation Installation Standards

6.6005.1 (a, b, c, d, e) Ventilation - Exhaust - Appliance Exhaust Vents - Clothes Dryer (SF) (MH)

6.6005.2 (a, b, c, d, e, f, g) Ventilation - Exhaust - Appliance Exhaust Vents - Kitchen range (SF) (MH)

4.1088.1 (a, b, c, d, e) Insulation - Attics - Special Considerations - Attic Ventilation (SF)

4.1088.3 (a, b, c) Insulation - Attics - Special Considerations - Skylights (SF)

4.1003 Attic Ceilings

Installing attic insulation appropriately is critical to ensure energy cost savings and client comfort. Insulation should be installed according to manufacturer's installation standards.

Generally, in the NeWAP, blown-in insulation is installed in attics because it provides a more continuous coverage and it has the capability of easily filling existing holes and insulation gaps. To avoid settling, the insulation must be installed based on manufacturer's specification, to a uniform depth and density for proper coverage.

The following standards must be met by NeWAP subgrantees installing attic insulation:

4.1005.4 (a, b, c, d) Insulation - Attics - Attic Floors - Accessible Floors - Loose Fill Over Existing Insulation (SF)

4.1003.1 (a, b, c, d) Insulation - Attics - Attic Ceilings - Pitched/Vaulted/Cathedralized Ceilings - Loose Fill (SF)

4.1003.2 (a, b) Insulation - Attics - Attic Ceilings - Pitched/Vaulted/Cathedralized Ceilings - Dense Pack Over (SF)

4.1003.3 (a, b, c) Insulation - Attics - Attic Ceilings - Unvented Flat roof with Existing Insulation (SF)

4.1003.4 (b, c, d, e) Insulation - Attics - Attic Ceilings - Cape Cod Side Attic - Dense Pack Installation (SF)

4.1005.2 (a, b, c, d) Insulation - Attics - Attic Floors - Accessible Floors - Loose Fill Insulation (SF)

4.1005.6 (a, b, c) Insulation - Attics - Attic Floors - Enclosed Attic Storage Platform Floors - Dense Pack Installation (SF)

4.1005.1 (a, b, c) Insulation - Attics - Attic Floors - Accessible Floors - Batt Insulation (SF)

4.1005.3 (a, b, c, d, e) Insulation - Attics - Attic Floors - Accessible Floors - Batt Insulation Over Existing Insulation (SF)

4.1003.5 (a, b, c) Insulation - Attics - Attic Ceilings - Unvented roof Deck - Spray Polyurethane Foam Installation (SF)

4.1003.6 (a, b, c) Insulation - Attics - Attic Ceilings - Vented Roof Deck - Spray Polyurethane Foam Installation (SF)

4.1005.7 (a, b, c, d, e) Insulation - Attics - Attic Floor - Preparation and Installation of Spray Polyurethane Foam (SF)

4.1006.3 (a, b, c, d, e) Insulation - Attics - Attic Openings - Whole House Fan (SF)

Manufactured housing specific work standards

4.1004 Knee Walls

Preparation and Installation Standards

In knee wall attics or attics in one-and-a-half story homes subgrantees must:

4.1004.1 (a, b) Insulation - Attics - Knee Walls - Preparation for Dense Packing (SF)

4.1004.3 (a, b, c, d) Insulation - Attics - Knee Walls - Strapping for Existing Insulation (SF)

4.1004.4 (a, b, c, d) Insulation - Attics - Knee Walls - Knee Wall Without Framing (SF)

4.1004.5 (a, b, c) Insulation - Attics - Knee Walls - Knee Walls and Gable Ends - Preparation for and Installation of Spray Polyurethane Foam (SF)

4.1004.2 (a, b, c) Insulation - Attics - Knee Walls - Preparation for Batt Insulation (SF)

4.1005 Attic Floors

4.1005.5 (a, b, c, d) Insulation - Attic Floors - Enclosed Bonus room Floor Over Unconditioned Space - Dense Pack Installation (SF)

4.1006 Attic Openings

Walk-Up Stair Attic Insulation Preparation and Installation Standards

In attics with walk-up stairs and door, subgrantees must:

3.1002.1 (a, b, c, d, e, f) Air Sealing - Attic - Open Stairwells - Interior with Sloped Ceilings (SF)

3.1002.2 (a, b, c, d, e, f) Air Sealing - Attic - Open Stairwells - Stairwell to Attic - Door at Bottom with No Ceiling Above (SF)

3.1002.3 (a, b, c, d, e) Air Sealing - Attic - Open Stairwells - Stairwell to Attic - Door at Top with Finished Ceiling Above (SF)

Attics With Retractable Stairs - Insulation Preparation and Installation Standards

In attics with retractable stairways, subgrantees must:

4.1006.1 (a, b, c, d) Insulation - Attics - Attic Openings - Pull-Down Stairs (SF)

4.1088 Special Considerations

The following standards must be followed when NeWAP subgrantees insulate attic areas that incorporate the following special construction considerations:

4.1088.1 (a, b, c, d, e) Insulation - Attics - Special Considerations - Attic Ventilation (SF)

4.1088.3 (a, b, c) Insulation - Attics - Special Considerations - Skylights (SF)

4.11 Walls

4.1101 Preparation

Prior to installing wall insulation subgrantees must inspect for, repair and document the following issues/concerns:

4.1101.1 (a, b) Insulation - Walls - Preparation - Exterior Wall Dense Packing (SF)

4.1102 Accessible Walls

In homes with accessible, open wall cavities Subgrantees must:

4.1102.1 (a, b, c, d) Insulation - Walls - Accessible Walls - Open Wall Insulation - General (SF)

4.1102.2 (a, b, c, d) Insulation - Walls - Accessible Walls - Open Wall Insulation - Spray Polyurethane Foam (SPF) Insulation (SF)

4.1103 Enclosed Walls

Exterior, Exterior Wall Insulation Installation Standards

Appropriate installation of wall insulation is essential to ensuring energy cost savings and client comfort. Insulation should be installed according to manufacturer's installation standards. In homes where exterior wall cavities are being blown, subgrantees must:

4.1103.1 (a, b) Insulation - Walls - Enclosed Walls - Dense Pack Exterior Walls (SF)

4.1103.2 (a, b, c, d, e, f) Insulation - Walls - Enclosed Walls - Additional Exterior Wall Cavities (SF)

4.1104 Manufactured Housing Walls

Exterior, Exterior Wall Insulation Installation Standards

Appropriate installation of wall insulation is essential to ensuring energy cost savings and client comfort. Insulation should be installed according to manufacturer's installation standards and the following standards:

4.13 Floors

Preparation and Inspection Requirements

In homes where a floor serves as an air/thermal boundary, prior to installing floor insulation subgrantees must inspect for, prepare for and document the following issues/concerns:

4.1301 Accessible Floors

General Floor Insulation Installation Standards

4.1301.1 (a, b, c, d) Insulation - Floors - Accessible Floors - Standard Floor System - Batt Insulation (SF)

4.1301.5 (a, b, c, d, e) Insulation - Floors - Accessible Floors - Standard Floor System - Cantilevered Floor - Batt Installation (SF)

4.1301.2 (a, b, c, d) Insulation - Floors - Accessible Floors - Standard Floor System - Loose Fill with Netting (SF)

4.1301.3 (a, b, c, d) Insulation - Floors - Accessible Floors - Standard Floor System - Loose Fill with Rigid Barrier (SF)

4.1301.4 (a, b, c, d) Insulation - Floors - Accessible Floors - Dense Pack Floor System with Rigid Barrier (SF)

Non-Exposed Floor Installation Standards

Exposed Floor Insulation Installation Standards

4.1005.5 (a, b, c, d) Insulation - Attic Floors - Enclosed Bonus room Floor Over Unconditioned Space - Dense Pack Installation (SF)

4.1301.5 (a, b, c, d, e) Insulation - Floors - Accessible Floors - Cantilevered Floor - Batt Installation (SF)

4.1301.6 (a, b, c, d, e) Insulation - Floors - Accessible Floors - Pier Construction Subfloor Insulation - Batt Insulation with Rigid Barrier (SF)

4.1301.7 (a, b, c, d) Insulation - Floors - Accessible Floors - Pier Construction Subfloor Insulation - Loose Fill with Rigid Barrier (SF)

4.1301.8 (a, b, c, d) Insulation - Floors - Accessible Floors - Pier Construction Subfloor Insulation - Dense Pack with Rigid Barrier (SF)

4.1301.9 (a, b, c, d) Insulation - Floors - Accessible Floors - Open Floors Over Unconditioned Space and Cantilevered Floors, Floors Over Garages, Floors Over Unconditioned Crawl Spaces - Spray Polyurethane (SF)

4.1303 Manufactured Housing Floor Cavity Insulation

Preparation and Inspection Requirements

In manufactured homes where a floor serves as an air/thermal boundary, prior to installing floor insulation subgrantees must complete an inspection of the floor assembly and document any issues/concerns found.

4.14 Basements and Crawl Spaces

4.1401 Band/Rim Joists

Preparation Requirements

Prior to installing rim joist insulation subgrantees must inspect for, prepare for and document the following issues/concerns:

Insulation Installation Requirements

4.1401.1 (a, b, c, d) Insulation - Basements and Crawl Spaces - Band/Rim Joists - Spray Polyurethane Foam (SPF) Installation (SF)

4.1401.2 (a, b, c) Insulation - Basements and Crawl Spaces - Band/Rim Joists - Insulation other than Spray Polyurethane Foam (SF)

4.1402 Basements and Crawl Space Walls

Insulating accessible foundations and sealing the thermal boundary(s) in the lower levels of buildings, can provide significant comfort and energy savings. Sealing at the lower level helps to reduce stack effects that can impact ductwork leakage in lower levels and indoor air quality.

Preparation and Air Sealing Requirements

Prior to installing foundation insulation subgrantees must inspect for, prepare for and document the following issues/concerns:

4.1401.1 (a, b) Insulation - Basements and Crawl Spaces - Band/Rim Joists - Spray Polyurethane Foam (SPF) (SF)

General Foundation Insulation Installation Requirements

Basement Wall Installation Requirements

4.1402.2 (a, b, c) Insulation - Basements and Crawl Space Walls - Basement Wall Insulation - No Groundwater Leakage (SF) (MH)

Crawl Space and Ledged Basement Walls Installation Requirements

4.1402.1 (a, b, d, g) Insulation - Basements and Crawl Space Walls - Closed Crawl Spaces - Wall Insulation (SF)

4.16 Ducts

Sealing, repairing and insulating existing accessible ductwork provides Nebraska Weatherization Assistance Program (NeWAP) clients with energy cost reductions and improved comfort. Sealing leaky ducts also help to improve indoor air quality.

Prior to sealing and/or insulating ducts NeWAP subgrantees must:

3.1601.1 (a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h, i, j) Ducts - Duct Preparation - Preparation and Mechanical Fastening (SF)

3.1601.2 (a, b) Ducts - Duct Preparation - Preparation for SPF Application (SF) (MH)

3.1601.3 (a) Ducts - Duct Preparation - Support (SF)

Prior to sealing and/or insulating ducts NeWAP subgrantees must verify and make reasonable attempts to ensure that duct systems are providing balanced, adequate airflow to living spaces. When airflow is a problem subgrantees must consider the following options:

4.1601 Insulating Ducts

Duct Insulation

4.1601.2 (a, b, c, d) Ducts - Insulating Ducts - Insulating Metal Ducts (SF)

5 Heating and Cooling

5.30 Forced Air

5.3001 Design and Replacement

Heating System Replacement Requirements

The following standards must be followed when furnaces are replaced/installed through the Nebraska Weatherization Assistance Program:

Replacement Heating System General Requirements

5.3002.1 (a, b, c, d, e) Heating and Cooling - Forced Air - Site Preparation - Preparation for New Equipment (SF)

2.0702.1 (a, b, c) Health & Safety - Occupant Education and Access - Installed Equipment - Warranty and Service Agreement (SF)

5.3001.1 (a, b, c) Heating and Cooling - Forced Air - Design - Load Calculation and Equipment Selection (SF)

Replacement Heating System Venting, Piping and Ducting General Requirements

5.3001.2 (a, b, c) Heating and Cooling - Forced Air - Design - Ductwork and Termination Design (SF)

Cooling System Replacements Requirements

Cooling system replacements completed through the NeWAP must be shown as cost-effective through the home's Energy Audit, with appropriate documentation included in the client file, and must not be charged to the health and safety line item.

The following standards must be followed for air conditioner or heat pump replacements to be reimbursed as eligible expenditures:

5.3001.1 (a, b, c) Heating and Cooling - Forced Air - Design - Load Calculation and Equipment Selection (SF)

Manufactured housing specific work standards

Ductwork Replacement Requirements

New ductwork installed through the NeWAP must meet the following requirements:

5.3001.2 (a, b, c) Heating and Cooling - Forced Air - Design - Ductwork and Termination Design (SF)

Replacement Heating System Thermostat General Requirements

2.0103.2 (b) Health and Safety - Safe Work Practices - Heating and Cooling Equipment - Heating and Cooling Worker Safety - Mercury (SF)

5.3003.9 (a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h, i, j, k, l, m) Heating and Cooling - Forced Air - System Assessment and Maintenance - Heating and Cooling Controls (SF)

5.3003 System Assessment/Inspection and Maintenance

Heating System Assessment/Inspection Requirements

Prior to weatherizing the building envelope, all eligible heating plants must be inspected by a Qualified Heating Technician, utility company or Trained Weatherization Staff. During testing, make appropriate efforts to repair and adjust the existing furnace or boiler, before deciding to replace it. Replacement parts like gas valves and controls for older heating units are commonly available.

Safety Inspection Requirements

The safety inspection must include all of the following that apply to the heating system being inspected:

2.0103.1 (a, b, c) Health & Safety - Safe Work Practices - Heating and Cooling Equipment - Combustion Worker Safety (SF) (MH)

2.0103.1 (a, b, c) Health & Safety - Safe Work Practices- Heating and Cooling Equipment - Combustion Worker Safety (SF) (MH)

5.3003.9 (a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h, i, j, k, m, n) Heating and Cooling - Forced Air - System Assessment and Maintenance - Heating and Cooling Controls (SF)

5.3003.4 (a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h) Heating and Cooling - Forced Air - System Assessment and Maintenance - Evaluating Electrical Service (SF)

5.3003.5 (a, b, c, d, e) Heating and Cooling - Forced Air - System Assessment and Maintenance - Refrigerant Line Inspection (SF) (MH)

The following additional standards must be followed when heating systems are designed, inspected, repaired, tune and cleaned and/or replaced through the Nebraska Weatherization Assistance Program:

5.3003.1 (a) Heating and Cooling - Forced Air - System Assessment and Maintenance - Data Plate Verification (SF) (MH)

5.3003.3 (a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h) Heating and Cooling - Forced Air - System Assessment and Maintenance - Evaluating Air Flow (SF) (MH)

5.3003.7 (a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h, i) Heating and Cooling - Forced Air - System Assessment and Maintenance - Occupant Education (SF) (MH)

5.3003.10 (a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h) Heating and Cooling - Forced Air - Systems Assessment and Maintenance - Condensate Drainage of Heating and Air Conditioning Equipment (SF)

5.3003.14 (a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h) Heating and Cooling - Forced Air - System Assessment and Maintenance - Combustion Analysis of Gas-Fired Appliances (LP and Natural Gas) (SF) (MH)

Heating System Clean & Tune and Maintenance Requirements

The following standards must be followed when heating systems are repaired and/or tuned and cleaned through the Nebraska Weatherization Assistance Program:

Gas Fired Furnace Clean and Tune requirements:

Electric Furnace Clean and Tune requirements:

Cooling System Maintenance

The NeWAP provides limited funding to complete repair and/or maintenance on existing central cooling systems, including:

5.3003.1 (a) Heating and Cooling - Forced Air - System Assessment and Maintenance - Data Plate Verification (SF) (MH)

5.3003.3 (a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h) Heating and Cooling - Forced Air - System Assessment and Maintenance - Evaluating Air Flow (SF) (MH)

5.3003.7 (a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h, i) Heating and Cooling - Forced Air - System Assessment and Maintenance - Occupant Education (SF) (MH)

5.3003.10 (a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h) Heating and Cooling - Forced Air - Systems Assessment and Maintenance - Condensate Drainage of Heating and Air Conditioning Equipment (SF) (MH)

5.31 Hydronic Heating (Hot Water and Steam)

The following standards must be followed when hydronic heating systems are designed, repaired and/or tuned and cleaned through the Nebraska Weatherization Assistance Program:

5.3101 Design

5.3101.1 (a, b) Heating and Cooling - Hydronic Heating (Hot Water and Steam) - Design - Heat Load Calculation - Whole House (SF)

5.3101.2 (a) Heating and Cooling - Hydronic Heating (Hot Water and Steam) - Design - Space Load Calculation - Heat Emitter Sizing (SF)

5.3104 Equipment Maintenance, Testing, and Repair

5.3104.1 (a, b, c, d, e, f) Heating and Cooling - Hydronic Heating (Hot Water and Steam) - Equipment Maintenance, Testing, and Repair - Controls - Thermostat Replacement (SF)

5.3104.2 (a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h, i) Heating and Cooling - Hydronic Heating (Hot Water and Steam) - Equipment Maintenance, Testing, and Repair - Maintenance: Gas Boiler Service Inspection (SF)

5.3104.3 (a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h, i, j, k, l, m) Heating and Cooling - Hydronic Heating (Hot Water and Steam) - Equipment Maintenance, Testing, and Repair - Maintenance: Checklist (SF)

6 Ventilation

6.60 Exhaust

6.6002 Components

Achieving effective exhaust in all buildings requires appropriate the design, configuration, connection, insulation (depending on location), equipment and terminations. NeWAP subgrantees must utilize the following standards for implementing exhaust ventilation.

6.6002.1 (a, b, c, d) Ventilation - Exhaust - Components - Ducts (SF)

6.6002.2 (a, b, c, d, e, f, g) Ventilation - Exhaust - Components - Terminations (SF)

6.6002.3 (a, b) Ventilation - Exhaust - Components - Exhaust-Only Ventilation - Fan Intake Grille Location (SF) (MH)

6.6003 Fans

NeWAP subgrantees must adhere to the following standards for the purchase and installation of exhaust fans.

6.6003.1 (a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h, i, j) Ventilation - Exhaust - Fans - Surface-Mounted Ducted (SF) (MH)

6.6003.2 (a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h, i) Ventilation - Exhaust - Fans - Inline (SF) (MH)

6.6003.3 (a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h, i, j, k) Ventilation - Exhaust - Fans - Through the Wall (SF)

6.6005 Appliance Exhaust Vents

Dryer Vents

Venting dryers indoors, into an attic or other areas of a home can lead to mold to growth, respiratory or more serious health conditions. NeWAP Subgrantees must vent existing unvented or improperly vented clothes dryers to the exterior of the home using the following installation standards:

6.6003.3 (a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h, i, j, k) Ventilation - Exhaust - Fans - Through the Wall (SF)

6.6005.1 (a, b, c, d, e) Ventilation - Exhaust - Appliance Exhaust Vents - Clothes Dryer (SF) (MH)

Kitchen Range Vents

Venting kitchen range vent indoors, into an attic or other areas of a home can lead to mold to growth, respiratory or more serious health conditions. NeWAP Subgrantees must vent existing unvented or improperly vented kitchen range vents to the exterior of the home.

6.6003.3 (a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h, i, j, k) Ventilation - Exhaust - Fans - Through the Wall (SF)

6.6005.2 (a, b, c, d, e, f, g) Ventilation - Exhaust - Appliance Exhaust Vents - Kitchen Range (SF) (MH)

6.61 Supply

6.6102 Components

Successfully supplying air into a building with appropriate the design, configuration, connection, insulation (depending on location), equipment and terminations help to improve indoor air quality and prevent condensation. NeWAP subgrantees must utilize the following standards for providing supply air in a home.

6.6102.1 (a, b, c, d, e, f) Ventilation - Supply - Components - Outside Air Ventilation Supply Ducts (SF)

6.6102.2 (a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h) Ventilation - Supply - Components - Intakes (SF)

6.6102.3 (a, b, c, d, e, f) Ventilation - Supply - Components - Intake for Ventilation Air to Forced Air System Used for Heating or Cooling (SF)

6.6188 Special Considerations

NeWAP subgrantees must utilize the following standards regarding supply air in conjunction with garages.

6.6188.1 (a, b, c, d, e, f) Ventilation - Supply - Special Considerations - Removing Supply Vents from Garages (SF)

6.62 Whole Building Ventilation

Mechanical Ventilation to Ensure Acceptable Indoor Air Quality

NeWAP subgrantees must implement the latest version of ASHRAE 62.2 to ensure acceptable indoor air quality in weatherized homes and all project files must include appropriate ventilation sizing documentation.

6.6201 Air Flow requirements

6.6201.2 (a) Ventilation - Whole Building Ventilation - Air Flow Requirements - Primary Ventilation Air Flow between rooms (SF)

6.6202 Components

6.6202.1 (a, b, c, d, e) Ventilation - Whole Building Ventilation - Components - Controls (SF)

6.6205 Exhaust-Only Strategies for Manufactured Housing System

6.6288 Special Considerations

6.6288.1 (a, b) Ventilation - Whole Building Ventilation - Special Considerations - Air Flow requirements - Sound-rating Limits (SF)

6.99 Additional resources

6.9901 Codes and Standards Resources

6.9901.1 (a) Ventilation - Additional resources - Special Considerations - Supplemental Ventilation Information - ASHRAE 62.2 (SF) (MH)

7 Baseload

Baseload is the energy consumed in the home that is not related to heating and/or cooling the home. Baseloads include the energy used for lighting, appliances, and water heating, but also includes plug loads for televisions, radios, computers, etc. and they are generally consistent from month to month.

7.80 Plug Load

7.8001 Refrigerators

The EPA estimates that replacing a 1980’s refrigerator can save about $140 per year and replacing a 1970’s refrigerator can save about $200 per year. Refrigerators built post 1990 use less electricity and can have a great impact on reducing a client’s electric baseload.

7.8001.1 Refrigerator Replacement Inspection and Audit Requirements

Inspect the existing unit, there are two methods allowed to estimate the savings that result from replacing an existing refrigerator. These methods must be incorporated into the initial inspection and energy audit:

The NEAT/MHEA Audit indicates a minimum of 60 minutes and a maximum of 360 minutes, the appliance must be metered for a minimum of 60 minutes (1 hours). Record the kWh usage and the number of minutes from the data logger on the Client Home Energy Audit.

If no manufacturer and model number information is available on the unit energy use of the existing unit must be verified by installing a digital power meter.

If the Energy Audit has determined that the replacement of multiple appliances is cost-effective, discuss the possibility with the client. Greater energy savings are realized if multiple appliances can be replaced with one (1) appliance.

7.8001.2 Refrigerator Replacement Requirements

7.8001.1 (a, b, c) Baseload – Plug Load – Refrigerator – Refrigerator Replacement (SF) (MH)

7.8001.3 Installation, Client Education and Client File Documentation Requirements

7.8003 Lighting

Lighting upgrades are one of the most cost-effective options available for reducing a buildings base load. Replacing traditional lights and upgrading switching can save 75% or more on your client's lighting energy costs. Lighting Measures that are indicated as cost-effective in the Energy Audit must be implemented.

7.8003.1 (a, b) Baseload - Plug Load - Lighting - Lighting Upgrade (SF) (MH)

7.81 Water Heating

Water Heating is generally the second highest source of energy usage in a home. The costs associated with water heater repair and/or replacements are eligible for reimbursement through the NeWAP. Water Heating Measures that are indicated as cost-effective in the Energy Audit must be implemented.

7.8101 Water Use reduction

Water Saving Showerheads, Faucet Aerators, and Leaky Faucets

Don't just consider the water they waste; they also waste the energy that was used to heat the water being lost.

Inspection requirement

7.8101.1 (a, b, c, d) Baseload - Water Heating - Water Use Reduction - Shower Head and Faucet Aerator (SF) (MH)

7.8102 Water Heater Installation and Replacement Requirements

7.8102.1 (a, b) Baseload - Water Heating - Installation and Replacement - Water Heater Selection (SF) (MH)

7.8102.2 (a, b, c, f, g, h, i, j, k, m, n) Baseload - Water Heating - Installation and Replacement - Storage-Type Appliances (SF) (MH)

7.8102.3 (a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h, i, j, k, l, m, n, o, p, q) Baseload - Water Heating - Installation and Replacement - On-Demand Appliance (SF) (MH)

7.8103.1 (a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h) Baseload - Water Heating - Maintenance/Inspection - Storage-Type Appliance (SF) (MH)

7.8103.2 (a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h, i, j, k, l, m) Baseload - Water Heating - Maintenance/Inspection - On-Demand Appliance (SF) (MH)

Manufactured housing specific work standards

7.8103 Water Heater Maintenance/Inspection/Repair Requirements

7.8102.2 (a, b, c, f, g, h, i, j, k, l, m, n) Baseload - Water Heating - Installation and Replacement - Storage-Type-Appliances (SF) (MH)

7.8103.1 (a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h) Baseload - Water Heating - Maintenance/Inspection - Storage-Type Appliance (SF) (MH)

7.8103.2 (a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h, i, j, k, l, m) Baseload - Water Heating - Maintenance/Inspection - On-Demand Appliance (SF) (MH)

Safety Inspection Standards

The safety inspection must include all of the following that apply to the water heating system being inspected:

2.0201.1 (b) Health & Safety - Safe Work Practices - Combustion Safety General - Combustion Appliance Zone ( CAZ ) Testing - Fuel Leak Detection (SF) (MH)

2.0201.1 (c) Health & Safety - Safe Work Practices - Combustion Safety General - Combustion Appliance Zone ( CAZ ) Testing - Venting (SF) (MH)

2.0105.1 (a) Health & Safety - Safe Work Practices - Baseload - Baseload Worker Safety (SF)

2.0201.1 (a) Health & Safety - Safe Work Practices - Combustion Safety General - Combustion Appliance Zone ( CAZ ) Testing - Assessment (SF) (MH)

7.8104 Water Heating Distribution System Requirements

Water Heater Tank and Pipe Insulation and Distribution System improvements help to reduce heat loss. These types of improvements can also help to reduce the amount of time that people wait for hot water after they turn on the faucet or shower.

Tank and Pipe Insulation Requirements

7.8102.2 (a, b, c, f, g, h, i, j, k, 1, m, n) Baseload - Water Heating - Installation and Replacement - Storage-Type-Appliance (SF) (MH)

8 Definitions

A

Accessible Attic: An attic with a minimum 24 inch clearance measured from the bottom of the top cord or ridge board to the top of the ceiling joists.

Accessible Ductwork/Hydronic Pipes: Ductwork or hydronic pipes with a minimum twenty four (24) inch clearance on a minimum of two (2) sides of the ductwork or hydronic pipes.

Accessible Foundation: A foundation with a minimum 24 inch clearance measured from the bottom of the floor joist to the ground.

Accessible Knee Walls: A knee wall with a minimum 36 inch clearance measured from the top of the floor joist to the bottom of the rafters and a minimum 36 inch clearance measured from the knee wall to the exterior wall.

Air Infiltration Barrier: A covering that will allow moisture out and not allow air into a space or wall cavity.

Atmospherically Vented Combustion Appliance: The most common type of gas appliances are atmospherically vented. They use a natural way to move the flue gases from the unit out with a vertical metal pipe, sometimes connected to the chimney, where the hot flue gases rise through the draft hood and flue pipe, and out into the atmosphere. The advantage of these types of appliances is the lower cost of the units and installation; however they also generally have a lower efficiency rate than the other systems.

B

Backdraft Damper: A damper that allows air to flow in only one direction.

Basement: The bottom full height story of a building below the first floor. A basement may be partially or completely below grade.

Building Envelope: The elements of a building between the interior and exterior environments that includes a combination of both the air and thermal barrier.

C

Trained Weatherization Staff: A subgrantee staff person who has successfully completed appropriate training to perform a task in the weatherization program.

CFM50: Cubic feet per minute of airflow at a 50 Pascal pressure difference between the interior and exterior of a structure.

Combustion Appliance Zone ( CAZ ): An area containing one or more atmospherically vented combustion appliances.

Conditioned: A space or area that contains a source intended specifically to heat or cool that space.

Continuous Ventilation: The process of mechanically removing stale air from a building or room by providing fresh air on a slow, continuous basis.

Cost Effective Blower Door Guided Air Sealing: The process of using a blower door to pressurize a home or building to determine the energy savings ratio between the calculated air sealing cost and infiltration reduction.

Crawl Space: A space below the first floor of a conditioned or unconditioned building that is less than full story height.

Crossover Duct: Enclosed air pathway to move conditioned air from one side of a double-wide manufactured home to the other side or from a manufactured home to a frame edition.

D

Dense Pack: The process of installing loose-fill insulation at a density that allows it to reduce air flow and perform to a stated R-value.

Distribution System: The enclosed pathway for conditioned air to travel to and from the heating/cooling plant. It must include but is not limited to the metal or fiber duct, panned floor cavity, designated wall cavity and the point where funnels and boots meet the wall or floor.

Direct Vent Appliances: Direct vent units are generally newer units designed to supply outdoor air directly to the sealed combustion chamber and then exhaust the flue gases to the outside of the home. Direct vent units include most condensing furnaces, manufactured home furnaces, manufactured home water heaters and some space heaters.

Disabled/Inoperable Heating Plants: Heating plants that have had the fuel source disconnected and/or capped and the flue disconnected.

E

Egress Window: A window that people can escape through in an emergency. The location, size and clearance requirements are dictated by the local building jurisdiction.

Eligible Heating Plant: A furnace or boiler that utilizes natural gas, propane, fuel oil or electricity as the fuel/energy source. Eligible heating plants include forced air, gravity, wall, floor, electric baseboard, manufactured home furnaces, heat pumps and boilers. Gravity furnaces that have been retrofitted with a blower or that have been converted from one fuel source or another are also eligible.

Exposed Floors: A floor that is in direct contact with the outside air (i.e. cantilevers, floors of bay or bow windows, garage ceilings, etc.).

F

Finished Attic: An attic space in a home that has been converted into an additional living space.

Fenestration: Openings in the walls of a building structure (i.e. windows, doors, etc.).

Friable: Material that can be crumbled, pulverized, or reduced to powder by the pressure of an ordinary human hand.

H

Hard Wired Alarms: Alarms (Smoke, Propane, CO, Moisture) that are wired directly into the building's electrical system.

Heat Source: Type-B vent, masonry chimneys that vent natural gas or propane and exhaust fans.

Heating Plant: A boiler or furnace, not including the flue, fuel piping, thermostat, distribution system, etc.

Heating System: A heating plant and the associated connections necessary for operation including, but not limited to, the flue, fuel piping, thermostat, distribution system, etc.

High-Heat Source: Heat produced through the combustion process by solid fuel and/or fuel oil combustion appliances. Recessed lighting is also considered a high-heat source.

Hydronic Pipes: Piping system used to distribute water or steam to and from water boilers or steam boilers.

I

Inaccessible Underbellies: A manufactured home underbelly with less than 24 inches clearance, measured from the weatherboard to the ground at the area to be weatherized.

Incidental Repair Cost: repair costs related to ensuring the effective performance or preservation of a new or existing weatherization measure.

Infiltration: The uncontrolled passage of outside air into a building through leaks in the building envelope.

Insulated Glass: The combination of two or more panes of glass sealed with air or inert gas between the panes.

K

Knee Wall: A vertical wall between an attic and a conditioned space.

L

Ledged Basement: A basement constructed with a concrete or dirt ledge less than 6 feet front to back, around the perimeter of the foundation. The ledge may be only around a portion of the foundation wall. Ledges more than 6 feet front to back are considered a crawl space.

Living Area: An area within the conditioned building envelope that is used on a regular basis for sleeping, eating, bathing etc.

M

Manufactured Housing: Commonly known as manufactured homes, is a type of prefabricated home that is assembled in a factory and transported to a site.

MERV (Minimum Efficacy Reporting Value) Filter: A filter that is tested, and rated, for its ability to filter and remove different size partials (pollutants) from the air. Basically, the higher the MERV rating, the higher the filtering performance.

Multi-family Buildings: The U.S. Department of Energy defines multifamily buildings based primarily on building size and heating characteristics:

O

Orphaned Equipment: A smaller combustion appliance (e.g., water heater) that remains in place after a larger appliance, that was commonly vented with the remaining unit, is removed or replaced and no longer utilizes the common vent. The larger exhaust flue or chimney that the unit continues to utilize is generally larger than necessary for the remaining smaller appliance.

P

Perm Rating: The measurement of a material's ability to allow the transfer of water vapor through the material.

Pressure Treated: Lumber that has been commercially treated under pressure with a wood preservative to prevent damage from moisture, insects, fungi and other forms of biological decay.

Programmable Thermostat/Setback Thermostat: A thermostat designed to adjust temperature settings according to a series of programmed settings that take effect at different set times of the day.

Q

Qualified Heating Technician: An individual or company that is specifically involved in the installation and/or servicing of residential heating/cooling systems.

Qualified Plumbing Technician: An individual or company that is specifically involved in the installation and/or servicing of residential plumbing systems.

Quality Control Inspection: An inspection that verifies that the work completed on the home complies with quality work standards and program regulations as defined by the Nebraska Energy Office and the U.S. Department of Energy.

S

Safety Glass: A type of glass that is designed to resist breaking, and to break in a way that minimizes the risk of injuries in the event the glass cannot withstand the forces on it.

Safety Inspection: An inspection performed by a Qualified Heating Technician, a natural gas utility, a propane supplier or Trained Weatherization Staff.

SIR (Savings to Investment ratio): A ratio of economic performance as calculated by NEAT/MHEA and MULTEA audits. An SIR of 1.0 indicates the weatherization measure will pay for itself one time during its life.

Spray-Applied Insulation: Insulation manufactured specifically to be spray-applied.

Stack Effect: The tendency for warm air to move upwards in a building or chimney, creating pressure differentials.

T

Tempered Glass: Toughened type of safety glass processed by control thermal or chemical treatments to increase its strength compared with normal glass.

Tube-fill Method: An insulation technique developed to install high density blown insulation in enclosed cavities.

Type-S-Fuse: A non-removable adapter that is screwed into the fuse socket permitting only one size fuse to be installed.

U

Unconditioned: An space or area having no source of heating or cooling.

Under-cut: To cut the bottom of an interior door to allow return air to flow from that area to the furnace compartment or common return.

Unsafe Water Heater: A unit that

  1. has been red tagged by a utility company/supplier or a building code jurisdiction,
  2. shows visual signs of deterioration such as scorch marks indicating past backdrafting occurrences
  3. shows signs of compromised water tank integrity as evidenced by signs of leakage
  4. when tested exceeds 200 ppm as measured in the flue gases or 70 ppm in the ambient air and the CO levels cannot be reduced.

Unvented Combustion Space Heater: An unvented gas heating unit generally intended to supply heat to a small area.

V

Vapor Barrier: A material that retards the passage of water vapor and contains a perm rating of less than 1.

Vapor Retarder: A material that slows the passage of water vapor and contains a perm rating above 1.

W

Weatherboard: A covering consisting of a minimum # 30 felt paper, exterior grade plywood, fiberboard, an air infiltration barrier or a material specifically manufactured as manufactured home weatherboard installed on the underside of a manufactured home to support and protect the floor insulation.

Nebraska Weatherization Assistance Program Standard Work Specifications

Single Family Housing Standard Work Specifications

2 Health & Safety

2.01 Safe Work Practices

2.0100 Safe Work Practices

2.0100.1 Global Worker Safety

2.0100.1b - Hand protection

Desired Outcome:

Work completed safely without injury or hazardous exposure

Specification(s):

Durable and wrist-protecting gloves will be worn that can withstand work activity

Objective(s):

Minimize skin contact with contaminants

Protect hands from hazards

Unsafe Safe
Recognize potential risks Wear appropriate hand protection
GOOD: Unsafe
Wear nitrile gloves when handling mastic Inspect gloves for holes and damage to minimize risk
2.0100.1c - Respiratory protection

Desired Outcome:

Work completed safely without injury or hazardous exposure

Specification(s):

If the risk of airborne contaminants cannot be prevented, proper r espiratory protection will be provided and worn (e.g., N-95 or equivalent face mask)

When applying low pressure 2-component spray polyurethane foam, air purifying masks with an organic vapor cartridge and P-100 particulate filter will be used

When applying high-pressure SPF insulation, supplied air respirators (SARs) will be used

Consult MSDSs for respiratory protection requirements

Objective(s):

Minimize exposure to airborne contaminants (e.g., insulation materials, mold spores, feces, bacteria, chemicals)

Unsafe Best Practice
Workers need to properly protect their airways when retrofitting Retrofits can have multiple different respiratory protection requirements
Whenever airborne contaminants are a possibility, wear an N-95 mask For two-component spray insulation, P-100 respirators should be used
When working with high-pressure spray foam, use a Supplied Air Respirator All P-100s should be fitted to the individual worker
When unsure what level of protection is necessary, check the MSDS
2.0100.1d - Electrical Safety

Desired Outcome:

Work completed safely without injury or hazardous exposure

Specification(s):

An electrical safety assessment will be performed

All electric tools will be protected by ground-fault circuit interrupters (GFCI)

Three-wire type extension cords will be used with portable electric tools

Worn or frayed electrical cords will not be used

Water sources (e.g., condensate pans) and electrical sources will be kept separate

Metal ladders will be avoided

Special precautions will be taken if knob and tube wiring is present

Aluminum foil products will be kept away from live wires

For arc flash hazards, NFPA will be consulted

Objective(s):

Avoid electrical shock and arc flash hazards

Unsafe Best Practice
Inspect house for unsafe electrical situations Attics and crawl spaces should be inspected closely for electrical safety before work begins
Use GFCIs and three-wire extension cords for all power tools Electrical wiring should not be located near a water source
Use fiberglass ladders in place of metal Follow NFPA guidelines for arc flash hazards
2.0100.1e - Carbon monoxide (CO)

Desired Outcome:

Work completed safely without injury or hazardous exposure

Specification(s):

All homes will have a carbon monoxide alarm

Ambient CO will be monitored during combustion testing and testing will be discontinued if ambient

CO level inside the home or work space exceeds 35 parts per million (ppm)

Objective(s):

Protect worker and occupant health

Unsafe Best Practice
STOP WORK if CO levels are higher than 35 ppm!! Install carbon monoxide alarms

Tools:

  1. CO meter
2.0100.1f - Personal Protective Equipment

Desired Outcome:

Work completed safely without injury or hazardous exposure

Specification(s):

MSDSs and OSHA regulations will be consulted for protective clothing and equipment

Eye protection will always be worn (e.g., Safety glasses, goggles if not using full-face respirator)

Objective(s):

Protect worker from skin contact with contaminants

Minimize spread of contaminants

Before After
Workers should be aware of work required and dress appropriately Ensure workers have proper protective equipment for work environment
Bad Practice Best Practice
This worker has donned some PPE, but is not fully protected. The worker has donned proper PPE, and is fully protected.
Select the proper PPE according to the task to be performed. More volatile substances require more protection.

Tools:

  1. Safety Glasses or Goggles
  2. Disposable Coverall
  3. Gloves
  4. Shoe Covers
  5. Ear Plugs (situation-dependent)
2.0100.1g - Confined space safety

Desired Outcome:

Work completed safely without injury or hazardous exposure

Specification(s):

Access and egress points will be located before beginning work

Inspection will be conducted for frayed electrical wires

Adequate ventilation will be provided

Use of toxic material will be reduced

Objective(s):

Prevent build-up of toxic or flammable contaminants

Provide adequate access and egress points

Prevent electrical shock

Unsafe After
Inspect confined spaces for safety concerns and hazards before work begins Locate all access and egress points of confined spaces before entering
Visual Inspection Best Practice
Ensure proper personal protective equipment is worn and that workers are aware of ingress and egress points Perform visual inspection of confined spaces before beginning work
In confined spaces, use a ventilator Check for frayed or worn electrical wires
Check GHS labels and Safety Data Sheets for all materials to minimize hazards Do NOT use hazardous materials in confined spaces - particularly those carrying these GHS warnings

Tools:

  1. Flashlight
  2. Ventilator
2.0100.1h - Power tool safety

Desired Outcome:

Work completed safely without injury or hazardous exposure

Specification(s):

Power tools will be inspected and used in accordance with manufacturer specifications and OSHA regulations to eliminate hazards such as those associated with missing ground prongs, ungrounded circuits, misuse of power tools, noise, and improper or defective cords or extension cords

All devices used will be verified as GFCI protected or double insulated

Exhaust gases from compressors and generators will be prevented from entering interior space

Objective(s):

Prevent power tool injuries

Before After
Worker is using a circular saw with no eye or ear protection, and is not properly supporting the material to be cut. Worker is cutting off of a stable surface, with appropriate eye and ear protection.
Inspect power and extension cords closely for damage. Follow manufacturer's instructions for repair or replacement. Generator has been moved off the trailer to ensure no buildup of harmful exhaust gases.
Make sure tools are GFCI-protected or double insulated
2.0100.1i - Chemical safety

Desired Outcome:

Work completed safely without injury or hazardous exposure

Specification(s):

Hazardous materials will be handled in accordance with manufacturer specifications or MSDS standards to eliminate hazards associated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs), sealants, insulation, contaminated drywall, dust, foams, asbestos, lead, mercury, and fibers

Appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) will be provided

Workers will be trained on how to use PPE

Workers will be expected to always use appropriate PPE during work

Objective(s):

Prevent worker exposure to toxic substances

2.0100.1j - Ergonomic safety

Desired Outcome:

Work completed safely without injury or hazardous exposure

Specification(s):

Appropriate PPE will be used (e.g., knee pads, bump caps, additional padding)

Proper equipment will be used for work

Proper lifting techniques will be used

Objective(s):

Prevent injuries from awkward postures, repetitive motions, and improper lifting

Unsafe Best Practice
Workers will take precautions to protect themselves on the job site Hard hats, knee pads, bump caps, and team lifts help to prevent injury

Visit OSHA - Safety and Health Topics - Ergonomics for additional guidance.

2.0100.1k - Hand tool safety

Desired Outcome:

Work completed safely without injury or hazardous exposure

Specification(s):

Hand tools will be used for intended purpose

Objective(s):

Prevent hand tool injuries

Before After
Using tools for other than their intended purpose is dangerous Use tools in a manner consistent with their intended purpose

Use hand tools only in a manner consistent with their intended purpose. Doing otherwise can cause serious injuries, damage to the tools, damage to materials and equipment. Besides being unsafe, the practice represents poor workmanship and leads to low quality results.

2.0100.1l - Slips, trips, and falls

Desired Outcome:

Work completed safely without injury or hazardous exposure

Specification(s):

Caution will be used around power cords, hoses, tarps, and plastic sheeting

Precautions will be taken when ladders are used, when working at heights, or when balancing on joists

Walk boards will be used when practical

Appropriate footwear and clothing will be worn

Objective(s):

Prevent injuries due to slips, trips, and falls

2.0100.1m - Heat and thermal stress

Desired Outcome:

Work completed safely without injury or hazardous exposure

Specification(s):

Appropriate ventilation, hydration, rest breaks, and cooling equipment will be provided

911 will be dialed when necessary

Objective(s):

Prevent heat stroke, heat stress, and cold stress related injuries

Attics and crawl spaces can be dangerous work places in the heat Keep workers comfortable with hydration and cool vests
2.0100.1n - Fire Safety

Desired Outcome:

Work completed safely without injury or hazardous exposure

Specification(s):

Ignition sources will be identified and eliminated (e.g., turn off pilot lights and fuel supply)

Use of flammable material will be reduced and fire-rated materials will be used

Objective(s):

Prevent a fire hazard

Unsafe After
Fire hazards like this should be removed from the work area with the permission and/or assistance of the homeowner. After potentially dangerous items have been removed, set combustion appliances to off or pilot to minimize risk of fire.
Remove items in close proximity to flue pipes with homeowner permission and/or assistance. Turn wall mounted heaters off.
Sometimes it may even be necessary to turn the fuel supply off to service an appliance. When sealing around heat sources like flue pipes, code approved fire-rated materials should always be used.
2.0100.1o - Asbestos-containing materials (ACM)

Desired Outcome:

Work completed safely without injury or hazardous exposure

Specification(s):

Assess potential asbestos hazard; if unsure whether material contains asbestos, contact a qualified asbestos professional to assess the material and to sample and test as needed

If suspected ACM is in good condition, do not disturb

If suspected ACM is damaged (e.g., unraveling, frayed, breaking apart), immediately isolate the area(s)

For suspected ACM that is damaged or that will be disturbed as part of the retrofit activity, contact an asbestos professional for abatement or repair in accordance with federal, state, and local requirements; only a licensed or trained professional may abate, repair, or remove ACM

When working around ACM, do not:

Asbestos abatement or repair work should be completed prior to blower door testing; exercise appropriate caution when conducting blower door testing where friable asbestos or vermiculite attic insulation is present to avoid drawing asbestos fibers into the living space (i.e., use positively pressurized blower door testing) unless the material has been tested and found not to contain asbestos

Objective(s):

Protect workers and occupants from potential asbestos hazards

2.0100.1p - Lead paint assessment

Desired Outcome:

Work completed safely without injury or hazardous exposure

Specification(s):

Presence of lead based paint in pre-1978 homes will be assumed unless testing confirms otherwise

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) renovation, Repair, and Painting (RRP) Program rule (40 CFR Part 745) in pre-1978 homes and proposed changes to this rule (Federal register/Vol. 75, No. 87/May 6, 2010) will be complied with, to be superseded by any subsequent final rulemaking or any more stringent state or federal standards

Objective(s):

Protect workers and occupants from potential lead hazards

Best Practice
In homes built before 1978, test paint before beginning renovation

Tools:

  1. Note: Mask must be worn during testing
  2. LeadCheck test kit
  3. Utility knife
  4. Camera

EPA RRP certification required to conduct Lead Paint Assessment.

1 2
Clean tools and sample site to prevent contamination Cut sample site at an angle to expose all older paint layers
3 4
Break capsules and shake to mix reagents. Swab sample site for 30 seconds Check swab for reaction
5 6
Red indicates lead positive. White is lead negative. If negative, verify validity of test with provided calibration card
7 8
Lead in calibration card should test positive and turn red Record test results to maintain documentation
2.0100.1r – Crawl space safety

Desired Outcome:

Work completed safely without injury or hazardous exposure

Specification(s):

The source of all contaminants (e.g., sewage, dead animals, needles) will be corrected, repaired, or removed before performing inspections that require complete access to the crawlspace

If appropriate, the contaminant will be neutralized and/or a protective barrier will be installed in the area

Objective(s):

Ensure work safety

Prevent worker exposure to hazards

2.0101 Air Sealing

2.0101.1 Air Sealing Worker Safety

2.0101.1a - Worker safety

Desired Outcome:

Work completed safely without injury or hazardous exposure

Specification(s):

Worker safety specifications will be in accordance with SWS Global Worker Safety

Complete safety action plan based on hazard; plan will be in place for each job site

Objective(s):

Prevent injury

Minimize exposure to health and safety hazards

2.0101.1b - Moisture precautions for crawl spaces and basements

Desired Outcome:

Work completed safely without injury or hazardous exposure

Specification(s):

Exposed earth will be covered with a continuous, durable, and sealed class I vapor retarder that is suitable for ground contact exposure to normal service traffic

Causes of air dew points greater than 55°F will be identified and eliminated in crawl spaces connected to conditioned spaces

Seasonal dehumidification (e.g., dehumidified or conditioned with air conditioner supply) will be recommended where humidity sources, including outdoor air incursion, cannot be eliminated

Undesigned penetrations between the crawl space or basement and the outdoors will be sealed living space will be sealed

Holes between the crawl space or basement and the living space will be sealed

Open sumps and intentional slab or vapor barrier penetrations will be sealed or capped to control moisture and radon levels

Objective(s):

Ensure durability of repairs

Reduce potential for occupant exposure to mold and other moisture-related hazards

Reduce potential for occupant exposure to radon and other soil gases

2.0101.1c – Moisture precautions: living space

Desired Outcome:

Work completed safely without injury or hazardous exposure

Specification(s):

Moisture sources in the building will be identified and reduced or removed

Where local ventilation will be installed, (e.g., baths, kitchens), exhaust units will be vented to the outdoors in accordance with ASHRAE 62.2

Unvented heaters will be removed except when used as a secondary heat source and when it can be confirmed that the unit is listed to ANSI Z21.11.2

Unvented gas or propane cooking stoves will be tested for carbon monoxide (CO ) per BPI Standard and corrected as required before air sealing work begins

If replacing air conditioning system, new system will be sized to optimize dehumidification

Properly sized dehumidifier will be installed to satisfy latent and sensible loads, when necessary

ANSI / ACCA 2 Manual J-2011 (Residential Load Calculation) will be used to size replacement AC and heat pumps

Objective(s):

Ensure durability of building components and repairs

Reduce potential for occupant exposure to mold and other moisture-related hazards

Reduce potential occupant exposure to CO

2.0101.1d – Moisture precautions for exterior water

Desired Outcome:

Work completed safely without injury or hazardous exposure

Specification(s):

Before air sealing and insulating building components, exterior water management will be addressed

Before insulating basement or crawl space walls near wet areas, surface water pooling near the foundation will be addressed by repairing, modifying, or replacing gutters and downspouts

Grading and subsurface drainage at critical locations (e.g., localized drain and grading beneath valleys) will be in accordance with EPA Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Section 1.1

Objective(s):

Reduce potential for occupant exposure to mold and other moisture-related hazards

2.0102 Insulation

2.0102.1 Insulation Worker Safety

2.0102.1a - Worker safety

Desired Outcome:

Work is completed safely without injury or hazardous exposure

Specification(s):

Worker safety specifications will be followed in accordance with SWS 2.0100 Global Worker Safety

Objective(s):

Prevent injury

Minimize exposure to health and safety hazards

2.0102.1b - Asbestos-containing materials (ACM)

Desired Outcome:

Work is completed safely without injury or hazardous exposure

Specification(s):

OSHA asbestos abatement protocol 29 CFR 1926.1101 will be followed if vermiculite insulation is present

Assess potential asbestos hazard; if unsure whether material contains asbestos, contact a qualified asbestos professional to assess the material, and to sample and test as needed

If suspected ACM is in good condition, do not disturb

If suspected ACM is damaged (e.g., unraveling, frayed, breaking apart), immediately isolate the area(s)

For suspected ACM that is damaged or that must be disturbed as part of the retrofit activity, contact an asbestos professional for abatement or repair, in accordance with federal, state, and local requirements; only a licensed or trained professional may abate, repair, or remove ACM

When working around ACM, do not:

Asbestos abatement or repair work should be completed prior to blower door testing; exercise appropriate caution when conducting blower door testing where friable asbestos or vermiculite attic insulation is present to avoid drawing asbestos fibers into the living space (i.e. use positively pressured blower door testing) unless the material has been tested and found not to contain asbestos

Objective(s):

Protect workers and occupants from potential asbestos hazards

Do not disturb vermiculite by vacuuming, dusting, or sweeping Do not disturb vermiculite by drilling, sanding, scraping, sawing, etc.
Before After
Material identified as vermiculite may contain asbestos If asbestos is suspected, call an EPA- accredited professional
2.0102.1c - Materials

Desired Outcome:

Work is completed safely without injury or hazardous exposure

Specification(s):

All materials will be handled in accordance with manufacturer specifications or Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) standards

Objective(s):

Eliminate hazards associated with incorrect, defective, or improperly used or installed materials

Best Practice
Ensure workers wear appropriate masks or respirators for the material with which they are working
Check SDS for materials to be used during retrofit to determine what PPE is necessary Wear respirator or mask appropriate to the materials being used
2.0102.1d - Lead paint assessment

Desired Outcome:

Work is completed safely without injury or hazardous exposure

Specification(s):

Presence of lead based paint in pre-1978 homes will be assumed unless testing confirms otherwise

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) renovation, Repair, and Painting (RRP) Program rule (40 CFR Part 745) in pre-1978 homes and proposed changes to this rule (Federal Register/Vol. 75, No. 87/May 6, 2010) will be complied with, to be superseded by any subsequent final rulemaking or any more stringent state or federal standards

Objective(s):

Protect worker and occupant from potential lead hazards

Best Practice
In homes built before 1978, test paint before beginning renovation

Tools:

  1. Note: Mask must be worn during testing
  2. LeadCheck test kit
  3. Utility knife
  4. Camera

EPA RRP certification required to conduct Lead Paint Assessment.

See 2.0100.1p - Lead paint assessment for steps and photos.

2.0103 Heating and Cooling Equipment

2.0103.1 Combustion Worker Safety

2.0103.1a - Worker safety

Desired Outcome:

Work completed safely without injury or hazardous exposure

Specification(s):

Worker safety specifications will be followed in accordance with SWS 2.0100 Global Worker Safety

Objective(s):

Prevent injury

Minimize exposure to health and safety hazards

2.0103.1b - Carbon monoxide (CO)

Desired Outcome:

Work completed safely without injury or hazardous exposure

Specification(s):

Ambient CO will be monitored during combustion testing and testing will be discontinued if ambient CO level inside the home or work space exceeds 35 parts per million (ppm)

Objective(s):

Protect worker and occupant health

Before After
STOP WORK if CO levels measure above 35 ppm!! Install carbon monoxide alarm if none are found.

Tools:

  1. CO meter
2.0103.1c - Raw fuel

Desired Outcome:

Work completed safely without injury or hazardous exposure

Specification(s):

Raw fuel leaks will be monitored for before entering building spaces

If leaks are found, testing will be discontinued and condition reported to occupant immediately

Objective(s):

Protect worker and occupant health

Before After
Fuel leaks need to be repaired by appropriate professional Notify occupant of any leaks

Tools:

  1. Gas sniffer
  2. Bubble solution
Check all raw fuel lines for leaks Use multiple methods to test for leakage–bubble solution
If bubbles develop, leak is present. Notify occupant Any leaks found should be reported to occupant and work stopped
Any leaks found should be reported to occupant and work stopped

2.0103.2 Heating and Cooling Worker Safety

2.0103.2a - Worker safety

Desired Outcome:

Work completed safely without injury or hazardous exposure

Specification(s):

Worker safety specifications will be followed in accordance with SWS 2.0100 Global Worker Safety

Objective(s):

Prevent injury

Minimize exposure to health and safety hazards

2.0103.2b - Mercury

Desired Outcome:

Work completed safely without injury or hazardous exposure

Specification(s):

When replacing existing thermostats, identify and dispose of any mercury containing thermostats in accordance with Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) guidance

Objective(s):

Protect workers and occupants from mercury exposure

Unsafe Safe
Mercury thermostats should be replaced and disposed of properly Do NOT dispose of mercury thermostats in the trash–find local recycling
2.0103.2c - Asbestos

Desired Outcome:

Work completed safely without injury or hazardous exposure

Specification(s):

Suspected asbestos hazards will be identified in furnaces (e.g., gaskets), wood stoves, zonal heating devices, electrical wiring insulation, boilers, and pipe insulation and corrected in accordance with EPA guidance

Workers will take precautionary measures to avoid exposure

Objective(s):

Protect workers and occupants from asbestos exposure

Unsafe Unsafe
Suspicious pipe insulation may contain asbestos Have an AHERA-certified professional test all areas with suspected asbestos. Remediate in accordance with EPA rules.
When asbestos is suspected, call in EPA-accredited professionals.
2.0103.2d - Personal protective equipment (PPE)

Desired Outcome:

Work completed safely without injury or hazardous exposure

Specification(s):

Workers will wear personal protective equipment (PPE ) as needed to protect themselves against exposure to hazards (e.g., pests, sewage, flooded duct work, mold, chemicals, scat, viruses)

Long sleeves and long pants should be worn as additional protection from liquid refrigerants and other hazardous materials

Objective(s):

Protect worker from exposure to hazards

Protect worker from skin contact with liquid nitrogen

Unsafe Safe
When working with refrigerants, short sleeves are inappropriate When working with refrigerants, workers should dress appropriately
Wear work gloves when working with metal ducts Assess the site and situation to determine proper PPE to minimize risks
2.0103.2e – Combustible gas detection

Desired Outcome:

Work completed safely without injury or hazardous exposure

Specification(s):

Worker will check for presence of combustible gas leaks before work begins

Leaks will be repaired before work is performed

Objective(s):

Protect worker and occupant from exposure to hazards

Unsafe Safe
Fuel leaks need to be repaired Repairs need to be tested and verified to no longer leak
1 2
Fuel leaks discovered during initial audit should be flagged Use approved combustion gas sniffer to see if repaired line still leaks
3 4
Repeatedly test repair site for leakage over a 10 min. period Allow testing solution to sit on newly repaired pipe joint for 10 min
5
Confirm repair and remove flag

Tools:

  1. Combustion gas detector
  2. Testing solution

Materials:

  1. Noncorrosive leak detection fluid

Paraphrased from IRC: Leakage will be located using an approved combustible gas detector, a noncorrosive leak detection fluid or an equivalent nonflammable solution. Matches, candles, open flames or other methods that could provide a source of ignition cannot be used.

Where leakage or other defects are located, the affected portion of the piping system will be repaired or replaced and retested.

2.0103.2f – Carbon monoxide

Desired Outcome:

Work completed safely without injury or hazardous exposure

Specification(s):

Workers will check for presence of ambient CO before and during work.

CO issues will be addressed before work is performed or continued

Objective(s):

Protect worker and occupant from exposure to hazards

Unsafe Best Practice
STOP WORK if CO levels are higher than 35 ppm!! Install carbon monoxide alarms
Test for CO in entire home, particularly around combustion appliances If CO issues are found, clean and tune appliances to remediate issues
All workers should wear personal ambient CO monitors and halt work if levels exceed 35 ppm

Tools:

  1. CO meter
2.0103.2g – Sealant

Desired Outcome:

Work completed safely without injury or hazardous exposure

Specification(s):

Pipes will be sealed by a certified professional with an approved fastening process and sealant in accordance with manufacturer specifications (International Fuel Gas Code)

Gas lines will be leak free when tested with an electronic combustible gas leak detector and verified with bubble solution

OR

Gas lines will be leak free when tested by a standing pressure test that meets the approval of the local code

Objective(s):

Install gas lines with no leaks

2.0103.2h – Safety devices

Desired Outcome:

Work completed safely without injury or hazardous exposure

Specification(s):

A secondary LP safety detector system (valve, exhaust fan, alarm light) will be installed by a certified professional for propane piping installed below grade

When installing new equipment, a shut off valve will be installed by a certified professional at each gas appliance (ANSI Z21.15)

Objective(s):

Detect accumulation of dangerous levels of propane in below-grade areas

Isolate appliances from the rest of the system for emergencies, removal, or repairs

2.0104 Ventilation Equipment

2.0104.1 Ventilation Worker Safety

2.0104.1a - Worker safety

Desired Outcome:

Work completed safely without injury or hazardous exposure

Specification(s):

Worker safety specifications will be followed in accordance with SWS 2.0100 Global Worker Safety

Objective(s):

Prevent injury

Minimize exposure to health and safety hazards

2.0105 Baseload

2.0105.1 Baseload Worker Safety

2.0105.1a - Worker safety

Desired Outcome:

Work is completed safely without injury or hazardous exposure

Specification(s):

Worker safety specifications will be followed in accordance with SWS 2.0100 Global Worker Safety

Objective(s):

Prevent injury

Minimize exposure to health and safety hazards

2.0106 Material Safety

2.0106.1 Material Selection, Labeling, and Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs)

2.0106.1a - Material selection

Desired Outcome:

Occupant and worker risk from hazardous materials minimized

Specification(s):

Materials that do not create long-term health risks for occupants and workers will be used

Objective(s):

Improve indoor air quality in the living space

2.0106.1b - Material labels

Desired Outcome:

Occupant and worker risk from hazardous materials minimized

Specification(s):

Manufacturer specifications will be followed

Objective(s):

Reduce risk of exposure to harmful substances

Follow safety procedures

2.0106.1c - Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs)

Desired Outcome:

Occupant and worker risk from hazardous materials minimized

Specification(s):

MSDSs will be provided onsite and available during all work

Objective(s):

Assess exposure risk

Prepare a response in case of emergency

2.0107 Basements and Crawl Spaces

2.0107.1 Basements and Crawl Spaces Worker Safety

2.0107.1a - Worker safety

Desired Outcome:

Work completed safely without injury or hazardous exposure

Specification(s):

Worker safety specifications will be followed in accordance with SWS 2.0100 Global Worker Safety

Objective(s):

Prevent injury

Minimize exposure to health and safety hazards

2.0107.2 Crawl Spaces - Pre-Work Qualifications

2.0107.2a - Fuel leaks

Desired Outcome:

Site properly prepared for upgrade

Specification(s):

Fuel leaks will be repaired and inspected in accordance with the IRC

Objective(s):

Ensure site is safe and ready for upgrade

Unsafe Safe
Fuel leaks need to be repaired Repairs need to be tested and verified to no longer leak

Tools:

  1. Combustion gas detector
  2. Testing solution
1 2
Fuel leaks discovered during initial audit should be flagged Use approved combustion gas sniffer to see if repaired line still leaks
3 4
Repeatedly test repair site for leakage over a 10 min period Allow testing solution to sit on newly repaired pipe joint for 10 min
5
Confirm repair and remove flag
2.0107.2b - Electrical hazards

Desired Outcome:

Site properly prepared for upgrade

Specification(s):

Electrical hazards will be eliminated and inspected in accordance with NFPA 70 National Electric Code

Objective(s):

Ensure site is safe and ready for upgrade

2.0107.2c - Mold

Desired Outcome:

Site properly prepared for upgrade

Specification(s):

Appropriate remediation will be completed before upgrade

Objective(s):

Ensure site is safe and ready for upgrade

2.0107.2d - Plumbing and water leaks

Desired Outcome:

Site properly prepared for upgrade

Specification(s):

Plumbing leaks will be repaired before crawl space upgrade in accordance with the IRC

Objective(s):

Prepare site for upgrade

2.0107.2e - Pest and termite work

Desired Outcome:

Site properly prepared for upgrade

Specification(s):

Pest and termite treatment will be completed before crawl space upgrade and inspected in accordance with the IRC

Objective(s):

Prepare site for upgrade

2.0107.2f - Structural repairs, modifications

Desired Outcome:

Site properly prepared for upgrade

Specification(s):

Structural repairs and modifications will be inspected and completed before crawl space upgrade in accordance with the IRC

Objective(s):

Prepare site for upgrade

2.0107.2g - Appliance and heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system repairs and change outs

Desired Outcome:

Site properly prepared for upgrade

Specification(s):

Crawl space upgrades (e.g., sealing and insulation) are to be undertaken after appliance and HVAC system work has been completed and inspected

Objective(s):

Prepare site for upgrade

2.0107.3 Crawl Spaces - Debris removal

2.0107.3a - Debris removal

Desired Outcome:

Clean, safe, and easily accessible crawl space created

Specification(s):

Under-floor grade will be removed of all vegetation and organic material

Debris that can cause injury or puncture ground covers (e.g., nails, glass, sheet metal screws, etc.) will be removed from the crawl space

Objective(s):

Minimize punctures in ground liner

Minimize habitat for pests (Integrated Pest Management-IPM) and contaminant sources

Before After
Crawl spaces with trash and overgrowth need to be made clean and safe. Rake up and clear away trash and overgrowth.

Tools:

  1. Rake
  2. Shop vacuum
  3. PPE
2.0107.3b - Debris disposal

Desired Outcome:

Clean, safe, and easily accessible crawl space created

Specification(s):

Debris will be properly disposed of according to type and jurisdiction

Objective(s):

Protect environment from damage

2.0107.4 Negative Pressure Contamination Control

2.0107.4a - Pressure

Desired Outcome:

Contaminants prevented from entering house during work process

Specification(s):

A negative pressure will be maintained in the crawl space with reference to the house while work is being performed in the crawl space

Objective(s):

Prevent contaminants from entering house

2.02 Combustion Safety

2.0201 Combustion Safety Testing - General

2.0201.1 Combustion Appliance Zone ( CAZ ) Testing

2.0201.1a - Assessment

Desired Outcome:

Accurate information about appliance safe operation is gathered

Specification(s):

Emergency problems (e.g., gas leak greater than 10% Lower Explosion Limit (LEL), ambient CO levels that exceed 70 ppm) will be communicated clearly and immediately to the customer, the home shall be evacuated, and appropriate personnel (e.g. HVAC technician, utility, emergency services) shall be contacted

Significant problems (e.g., gas leak less than 10% LEL, ambient CO levels that exceed 35 ppm but less than 70 ppm) will be communicated clearly and immediately to the customer and appropriate solutions will be suggested

Examine appliance for signs of damage, misuse, improper repairs, and lack of maintenance

Objective(s):

Ensure system does not have potentially fatal problems

Before After
Unsafe combustion appliances indicate need for repair or replacement In cases of replacement, ensure new appliance is safe and sized properly
Assess existing combustion appliances for damage and replace when necessary When a simple filter cleaning or replacement will help, make it happen
Ensure there is adequate make-up air – combustion air inlet in closet Stop the misuse of combustion appliances – camp heater in bedroom
Keep occupant apprised of any health or safety concerns
2.0201.1b - Fuel leak detection

Desired Outcome:

Accurate information about appliance safe operation is gathered

Specification(s):

Inspect and test for gas or oil leakage at connections of natural gas, propane piping, or oil systems

If leaks are found, immediate action will be taken to notify occupant to help ensure leaks are repaired

The report will specify repair for leaks and replacement for hazardous or damaged gas or oil connectors and pipes

Objective(s):

Detect fuel gas leaks

Determine and report need for repair

Before After
Fuel lines should be inspected for leakage If leaks are found, notify occupant immediately to facilitate repair

Tools:

  1. Gas sniffer
  2. Spray bottle

Materials:

  1. Bubble solution
Inspect exterior gas and oil lines for leaks and damage Inspect flex lines for damage, and check date on ring for pre-1973 hardware
2.0201.1c - Venting

Desired Outcome:

Accurate information about appliance safe operation is gathered

Specification(s):

For oil systems, the presence and operability of it (that draft regulator) will be verified and tested

Combustion venting systems will be inspected for damage, leaks, disconnections, inadequate slope, and other safety hazards

Objective(s):

Determine if a draft regulator is present and working

Determine whether vent system is in good condition and installed properly

Unsafe Safe
If ventilation system puts occupants at risk, it needs immediate attention Properly vented appliances make a house healthier and more efficient
Determine if a draft regulator is installed and working Inspect ventilation systems for disconnected pipes
Inspect ventilation systems for damage Inspect ventilation systems for inadequate slope
Inspect for missing draft diverter
2.0201.1d - Base pressure test

Desired Outcome:

Accurate information about appliance safe operation is gathered

Specification(s):

Baseline pressure for naturally drafting vented appliances will be measured in Combustion Appliance Zone with reference to outdoors

Objective(s):

Measure pressure difference between combustion zone and the outside under natural conditions

Best Practice
Natural conditions–Winter set-up, Exhaust fans off, Interior doors open

Tools:

  1. Manometer
2.0201.1e - Depressurization test

Desired Outcome:

Accurate information about appliance safe operation is gathered

Specification(s):

CAZ depressurization testing will be administered for all equipment equipped with a draft hood

Depressurization test will include exhaust fans, interior door closure, or duct leakage, or a combination thereof; the test will be done to determine the largest negative pressure per BPI Standard 1200

Objective(s):

Determine worst-case depressurization in combustion zone due to mechanical system fans

Best Practice
Exhaust fans on, Check interior doors, Air handler on?

Tools:

  1. Manometer
1 2
Place manometer reference hose to exterior of house Attach test hose to be used in the interior of the house
3 4
Place test hose by combustion appliance Take baseline reading
5 6
Turn on interior exhaust fans, including any clothes dryers Is the air handler on?
7 8
Check interior doors for pressure differential either using smoke pencil or hand Manometer reading should not be more negative than -3pa
9
If reading is within allowable limit, all is well

2.0201.2 Combustion Safety - Make-up Air

2.0201.2a - Outside combustion make-up air

Note:

The authority having jurisdiction may require that a licensed professional perform certain tasks outlined in this detail

Desired Outcome:

Build-up of dangerous combustion byproducts in the living space prevented

Specification(s):

Where applicable, combustion air will be provided from the outside and installed in accordance with the IRC for the type of appliance installed

Objective(s):

Prevent combustion byproducts from entering the house

min free area of 1 sqin per 3,000 Btu/h (734 mm2/kW) of total input rating min free area of 1 sqin per 4,000 Btu/h (550 mm2/kW) of total input rating
min free area of 1 sqin per 2,000 Btu/h (1100 mm2/kW) of total input rating
2.0201.2b - New appliances

Note:

The authority having jurisdiction may require that a licensed professional perform certain tasks outlined in this detail

Desired Outcome:

Build-up of dangerous combustion byproducts in the living space prevented

Specification(s):

If replacing appliances, a sealed-combustion, direct-vent appliance will be installed, if possible. New appliances will be installed in accordance with manufacturer specifications, the IRC and additional applicable codes

Objective(s):

Prevent combustion byproducts from entering the house

Before After
Damaged combustion appliances beyond repair should be replaced Sealed-combustion, direct-vent appliances should replace unsafe appliances

Tools:

  1. Digital manometer and air line tubing
  2. Personal carbon monoxide detector
  3. Combustion analyzer
  4. Combustible gas leak detector
Two-pipe 90% efficiency furnaces are viable replacement appliances Direct vent combustion appliances are also viable replacements
2.0201.2c - CO detection and warning equipment

Note:

The authority having jurisdiction may require that a licensed professional perform certain tasks outlined in this detail

Desired Outcome:

Build-up of dangerous combustion byproducts in the living space prevented

Specification(s):

CO detection or warning equipment will be installed outside of each separate sleeping area in the immediate vicinity of the bedrooms in accordance with ASHRAE 62.2 and authority having local jurisdiction

Installation will be accomplished by a licensed electrician when required by local code

Objective(s):

Alert occupant to CO exposure

Best Practice Best Practice
Carbon Monoxide alarms should be installed according to local codes Alarms should be mounted near sleeping areas – such as the one marked in red

Tools:

  1. Drill

Materials:

  1. CO alarm
  2. Fasteners
2.0201.2d - Gas ovens - Approved Variance

Note:

The authority having jurisdiction may require that a licensed professional perform certain tasks outlined in this detail

Desired Outcome:

Build-up of dangerous combustion byproducts in the living space prevented

Specification(s):

Gas ovens will be tested for CO

A clean and tune will be conducted if measured CO in the undiluted flue gases of the oven vent at steady state exceeds 225 ppm as measured

If the measured CO in undiluted flue gasses in the oven vent at steady state exceeds 225 ppm as measured, the problem will be communicated clearly and immediately to the client

The home will be appropriately ventilated and appropriate solutions will be suggested.

The subgrantee must clearly indicate to the client, in writing, and in the client file why the dwelling was given "deferral" status and the condition that must be corrected before weatherization services are provided.

Objective(s):

Ensure clean burn of gas ovens

Unsafe Best Practice
If air-free CO reading exceeds 225 ppm, order a clean and tune Test gas oven for carbon monoxide using a combustion gas analyzer

Tools:

  1. Combustion analyzer with probe
2.0201.2e - Gas range burners

Note:

The authority having jurisdiction may require that a licensed professional perform certain tasks outlined in this detail

Desired Outcome:

Build-up of dangerous combustion byproducts in the living space prevented

Specification(s):

Specify clean and tune if the flame has any discoloration, flame impingement, an irregular pattern, or if burners are visibly dirty, corroded, or bent

Objective(s):

Ensure clean burn and operation of gas range burners

Before After
Discoloration is a clear sign that a gas range needs a clean and tune A properly operating gas range burner should have an even blue flame
1 2
Yellow, uncontrolled flames indicate the need for a clean and tune Gas ranges should be cleaned and tuned if improper operation is evident
3
Blue, even flames indicate burners are working properly
2.0201.2f - Solid fuel burning appliances

Note:

The authority having jurisdiction may require that a licensed professional perform certain tasks outlined in this detail

Desired Outcome:

Build-up of dangerous combustion byproducts in the living space prevented

Specification(s):

If the solid fuel burning appliance is the primary heat source and has signs of structural failure replace solid fuel burning appliance with UL-listed and EPA-certified appliances if the existing appliance is not UL-listed

Objective(s):

Ensure safe operations of solid fuel burning appliances

Unsafe Safe
Unsafe solid fuel burning appliances should be replaced New appliances should be UL-listed and EPA-certified
Locate data plate to find out appliance ratings Check appliance rating plates for EPA and UL markings (or CSA, ETL, or WH markings)

2.0202 Unvented Space Heaters

2.0202.1 Unvented Space Heaters: Propane, Natural Gas, and Kerosene Heaters

2.0202.1a - Removal

Desired Outcome:

Elimination of combustion byproducts

Specification(s):

With the occupant's permission, unvented heaters will be removed except when used as a secondary heat source and when it can be confirmed that the unit is listed to ANSI Z21.11.2

Units that are not being operated in compliance with ANSI Z21.11.2 should be removed before the retrofit but may remain until a replacement heating system is in place

Failure to remove unvented space heaters serving as primary heat sources has the potential to create hazardous conditions and thus any further weatherization services will be re-evaluated in the context of potential indoor air quality risks

Objective(s):

Eliminate sources of combustion byproduct within a living space

Before After
Unvented space heaters should be removed with the occupants' permission Unvented space heaters can be replaced with properly vented space heaters
Secure permission to remove unvented space heaters from occupants Ensure new combustion appliances are vented properly
2.0202.1b - Occupant education

Desired Outcome:

Elimination of combustion byproducts

Specification(s):

Occupant will be educated on potential hazards of unvented combustion appliances (primary or secondary) within a living space

Objective(s):

Inform occupant about possible hazards associated with combustion byproducts and moisture

Unsafe Best Practice
Unvented space heaters in homes are hazardous to occupants Clearly communicate the hazards to the occupant in order to inform their decision to remove the appliance
Unvented space heaters significantly increase the risk of house fires Unvented combustion gases cause a hazard to all occupants
Unvented space heaters can create moisture issues in homes, leading to black mold

2.0203 Vented Gas Appliances

2.0203.1 Combustion Air for Natural Draft Appliances

2.0203.1a - Required combustion air

Desired Outcome:

Sufficient air provided in the Combustion Appliance Zone ( CAZ )

Specification(s):

The required volume of indoor air will be determined in accordance with IRC Section G2407.5.1 or G2407.5.2 and authority having jurisdiction, except that where the air infiltration rate is known to be less than 0.40 air changes per hour (ACH), IRC Section G2407.5.2 will be used

Objective(s):

Determine if existing conditions meet the combustion air calculation

Best Practice

G2407.5.1 (304.5.1) Standard method. The minimum required volume shall be 50 cubic feet per 1,000 Btu/h (4.8 m3/kW).

G2407.5.2 (304.5.2) Known air-infiltration-rate method. Where the air infiltration rate of a structure is known, the minimum required volume shall be determined as follows: For purposes of this calculation, an infiltration rate greater than 0.60 ACH shall not be used in Equations 24-1.

For appliances other than fan-assisted, calculate volume using Equation 24-1.

Required Volume (natural draft) ≥ ((21ft 3/ACHn) * (Input (other) / 1,000BTU/hr))

Input (other) = All appliances other than fan-assisted (input in Btu/h).

ACHn = Air change per hour under natural conditions

Standard:

100,000 BTUH Furnace Input 100,000 x .05 = 5,000 ft3

or 100,000/1000 = 100

100 x 50 = 5,000 ft3

Known infiltration rate method (assuming ACHn is .50 in this example):

((21ft3/.50)*(100,000/ 1,000BTU/hr)) = 4,200 ft3

Measure the CAZ width Measure the CAZ length
Measure the CAZ height
2.0203.1b - Additional combustion air (if action is required)

Desired Outcome:

Sufficient air provided in the Combustion Appliance Zone ( CAZ )

Specification(s):

Additional combustion air will be provided in accordance with IRC G2407 and authority having jurisdiction when necessary to solve spillage problems

Objective(s):

Ensure adequate combustion air for operation of the appliance

Before After
Combustion appliances in a confined space Additional combustion air supplied from high / low vents

Tools:

  1. Drywall saw
  2. Drill
  3. Tin snips
  4. Tape measure
  5. Wire cutters

Materials:

  1. Metal ducts
  2. 1/4" galvanized hardware cloth mesh
  3. Galvanized straps or L-brackets to secure high/low vents
  4. Screws
  5. Louvered grilles (optional)
  6. Louvered doors (optional)

Combustion appliances require 50 cubic feet of volume for every 1,000 Btuh input. If this is not available, provide makeup air in accordance with the IRC G.2407 or local code.

When high/low vents are used, use two metal ducts each having 1 in2 of cross-sectional area for every 4,000 Btuh input. Extend each into the attic above the insulation level, and use 1/4" galvanized hardware cloth mesh on top to screen out insects and vermin. Terminate one vent within 12 inches of the ceiling, and one vent within 12 inches of the floor. The vents may be concentric (one inside the other) to save space, so long as the difference between the area of the larger and smaller vents is equal to or greater than the 1 in2/4,000 Btuh requirement.

If using a single large opening in the ceiling, make the opening total 1 in2 per 3,000 Btuh input.

If high/low vents extend horizontally through a CAZ wall, use vents with 1 in2 of area per 2,000 Btuh of input.

Louvered grilles or doors may be used to connect the CAZ to larger sections of the home to achieve the required volume, but be aware that using this approach has higher potential for creating a carbon monoxide pathway into the home than does creating a sealed CAZ with high/low vents.

Select vent sizes based on the total input Btus in the CAZ. Concentric vents are shown Cut hole in ceiling and mount high/low vents to framing
Fasten 1/4" galvanized hardware cloth over high / low vent openings Complete installation by adding supports and fasteners as required for stability and durability
Terminate the low vent within 12 inches of the floor. This one is mounted inside a section of larger diameter metal duct
2.0203.1c - Spillage testing

Desired Outcome:

Sufficient air provided in the Combustion Appliance Zone ( CAZ )

Specification(s):

If spillage in a combustion appliance with a warm vent exceeds two minutes during pressure testing, specify measures to mitigate

If spillage in a combustion appliance with a cold vent exceeds five minutes during pressure testing, specify measures to mitigate

Objective(s):

Detect excessive spillage of combustion gases

2.0203.2 Combustion Flue Gas - Orphaned Water Heaters

2.0203.2a - Spillage testing

Desired Outcome:

Flue gasses successfully removed from the house

Specification(s):

If spillage in a combustion appliance with a warm vent exceeds two minutes during pressure testing, specify measures to mitigate

If spillage in a combustion appliance with a cold vent exceeds five minutes during pressure testing, specify measures to mitigate

Objective(s):

Detect excessive spillage of combustion gases

Unsafe Unsafe
Orphaned water heaters have oversized flues after a furnace is removed Spillage should not exceed 2 minutes, if present

Tools:

  1. Smoke pencil
  2. Stopwatch or timer
2.0203.2b - Flue gas removal (chimney liner) - Approved Variance

Desired Outcome:

Flue gasses successfully removed from the house

Specification(s):

A chimney liner will be installed in accordance with the IRC or applicable NFPA standard

In the case of excessive room pressures and/or chimney conditions, a power vent may be installed on the water heater as an alternative to installing a chimney liner

Objective(s):

Allow water heater to vent properly

Prevent damage to the chimney

2.0203.2c - Retesting spillage

Desired Outcome:

Flue gasses successfully removed from the house

Specification(s):

If a combustion appliance spillage exceeds 2 minutes during pressure testing, specify measures to mitigate

Objective(s):

Ensure appliance is not spilling longer than 2 minutes with a warm vent

Before After
If spillage continues to exceed 2 min, additional repairs are required The elimination of the oversized chimney should prevent spillage

Tools:

  1. Smoke pencil
1 2
Retest for spillage. If spillage remains, more repair is needed. Repipe the flue to eliminate the oversized chimney
3
When repairs have been completed, no spillage should occur
2.0203.2d - Required combustion air

Desired Outcome:

Flue gasses successfully removed from the house

Specification(s):

The minimum required volume will be 50 cubic feet per 1,000 Btu/h in accordance with IRC G2407.5.1 and authority having jurisdiction

Exception: Existing appliances that have passed combustion safety testing per BPI 1200 are deemed to have sufficient combustion air

Objective(s):

Determine if existing conditions meet the combustion air calculation

2.0203.2e - Additional combustion air (if action is required)

Desired Outcome:

Flue gasses successfully removed from the house

Specification(s):

Additional combustion air will be provided in accordance with IRC G2407 or other authority having jurisdiction

Objective(s):

Ensure adequate combustion air for operation of the appliance

2.03 Safety Devices

2.0301 Combustion Safety Devices

2.0301.1 Smoke Alarm

2.0301.1b - Smoke alarm (battery operated)

Desired Outcome:

Properly installed smoke alarms

Specification(s):

Battery operated alarms will be installed in accordance with the manufacturer specifications

Objective(s):

Ensure proper installation

Best Practice
All homes should have UL-217 rated smoke alarms
Ceiling mounted smoke alarms can be battery-operated Wall mounted smoke alarms must be mounted within 12 inches of the ceiling

2.0301.2 Carbon Monoxide Alarm or Monitor

2.0301.2a - CO detection and warning equipment (hardwired)

Desired Outcome:

Properly installed CO alarms or monitors

Specification(s):

Hardwired CO detection or warning equipment will be installed in accordance with ASHRAE 62.2 or as required by the authority having jurisdiction

Objective(s):

Ensure proper installation

Best Practice Best Practice
All homes should have a carbon monoxide detector installed, whether hardwired or battery operated Alarms should be mounted near sleeping areas–such as the one marked in red
After
Alarms should be mounted in sleeping areas – such as the one marked in red
1 2
Mount alarm to wall close to bedrooms Plug alarm into outlet. In addition, cord can be stapled into place

Tools:

  1. Hammer

Materials:

  1. Nails
2.0301.2b - CO detection and warning equipment (battery operated)

Desired Outcome:

Properly installed CO alarms or monitors

Specification(s):

Battery operated CO detection or warning equipment will be installed in accordance with ASHRAE 62.2 and manufacturer specifications as required by the authority having jurisdiction

Objective(s):

Ensure proper installation

Unsafe Best Practice
ALL houses should have carbon monoxide monitors installed near sleeping areas Battery operated CO alarms should be UL-2075 or UL-2034 compliant

2.04 Moisture

2.0401 Air Sealing

2.0401.1 Air Sealing Moisture Precautions

2.0401.1a - Moisture precautions for attics

Desired Outcome:

Ensure durability of repairs and reduce potential for occupant exposure to mold and other moisture-related hazards

Specification(s):

Roof leaks will be repaired before performing attic air sealing or insulation

Moisture sources in the house that can generate moisture into the attic will be identified and removed or reduced

Objective(s):

Ensure durability of repairs

Reduce potential for occupant exposure to mold and other moisture-related hazards

Prevent moisture from communicating from within the conditioned space into unconditioned attic space when economically feasible

2.0401.1b - Moisture precautions for crawl spaces

Desired Outcome:

Ensure durability of repairs

reduce potential for occupant exposure to mold and other moisture-related hazards

Specification(s):

Exposed earth will be covered with a continuous, durable, sealed Class 1 vapor retarder a minimum of 6 mils in thickness

Any vapor retarder shall not encasulate wood building materials or spray foam

Holes between the crawl space and the living space will be sealed

Objective(s):

Ensure durability of repairs

Reduce potential for occupant exposure to mold and other moisture-related hazards

2.0401.1c - Moisture precautions for the living space

Desired Outcome:

Ensure durability of repairs and reduce potential for occupant exposure to mold and other moisture-related hazards

Specification(s):

Moisture sources in the home will be identified and removed or reduced

Local ventilation will be installed where appropriate (e.g., baths, kitchens) and vented to outside according to ASHRAE 62.2-2016

Unvented combustion appliances that are not listed to ANSI Z21.11.2 will be removed

Objective(s):

Ensure durability of repairs

Reduce potential for occupant exposure to mold and other moisture-related hazards

2.0403 Vapor Barriers

2.0403.1 Vented Crawl Spaces - Ground Moisture Barrier

2.0403.1a - Material integrity

Desired Outcome:

Durable, effective ground moisture barrier provides long-lasting access and minimizes ground vapor

Specification(s):

Care will be taken to prevent punctures during installation

Objective(s):

Protect ground moisture barrier from damage during other crawl space work

2.0403.1b - Coverage

Desired Outcome:

Durable, effective ground moisture barrier provides long-lasting access and minimizes ground vapor

Specification(s):

A ground moisture barrier that covers 100% of the exposed crawl space floor will be installed

Objective(s):

Reduce ground moisture entering the crawl space

Before After
Uncovered crawl space floors can cause moisture damage Ground moisture barrier to cover 100% of floor is installed last

Materials:

  1. Plastic sheeting (at least 6 mil)
  2. Furring strips
  3. Fasteners
2.0403.1c - Material specification

Desired Outcome:

Durable, effective ground moisture barrier provides long-lasting access and minimizes ground vapor

Specification(s):

A ground moisture barrier with a rating of no more than 0.1 perm will be used

A ground moisture barrier will be used that meets tear and puncture resistance standard ASTM E1745

Homeowner will be advised that all plastic is biodegradable and will have a life span much shorter than the home (5 years), and it will need replacing to remain effective

Objective(s):

Ensure crawl space is accessible for service and maintenance without damaging the integrity of the ground moisture barrier

Best Practice
Barrier must be at least 6 mil, able to withstand puncture and last 10 years

Materials:

  1. Plastic sheeting (at least 6 mil)
  2. Furring strips
  3. Fasteners
2.0403.1d - Overlap seams

Desired Outcome:

Durable, effective ground moisture barrier provides long-lasting access and minimizes ground vapor

Specification(s):

When seams exist, they will be overlapped a minimum of 12" using reverse or upslope lapping technique

Objective(s):

Keep water under the liner

Reduce the likelihood of damage at seams

Before After
Ground moisture barriers help keep moisture from permeating floor. Ground moisture barrier overlaps at least 12 inches and is securely fastened

Tools:

  1. Stapler
  2. Utility knife
  3. Drill

Materials:

  1. Ballast
  2. Plastic sheeting (at least 6 mil)
  3. Furring strips
  4. Seam tape - moisture resistant
Securely fasten moisture barrier to wall at least 6 inches from ground Overlap seams at least 12 inches, using a shingle method to keep water out
2.0403.1e - Fastening

Desired Outcome:

Durable, effective ground moisture barrier provides long-lasting access and minimizes ground vapor

Specification(s):

When ground moisture barrier is installed on sloping ground, may be exposed to wind, or accessed for routine maintenance or storage it will be fastened to ground with durable fasteners or ballast(s).

Objective(s):

Prevent movement of the ground moisture barrier

Before After
Fastening of moisture barrier is required and must last at least 10 years Ground moisture barrier should extend up the wall at least 12" and be held in place
Moisture barrier needs to be held in place with more permanent fasteners Ballast or fasteners should be used to hold barrier in place securely

Tools:

  1. Stapler
  2. Drill

Materials:

  1. Plastic sheeting (al least 6 mil)
  2. Furring strips
  3. Fasteners
1 2
Seams can be taped to prevent water leakage Ballast or fasteners can hold barrier in place securely

2.0403.2 Closed Crawl Spaces - Ground Moisture Barriers

2.0403.2a - Material integrity

Desired Outcome:

Durable, effective air barrier and ground moisture barrier provide ongoing access and minimize ground vapor

Specification(s):

Care will be taken to prevent punctures during installation

Objective(s):

Protect ground moisture barrier from damage during other crawl space work

2.0403.2b - Coverage

Desired Outcome:

Durable, effective air barrier and ground moisture barrier provide ongoing access and minimize ground vapor

Specification(s):

An air barrier and ground moisture barrier, covering 100% of the exposed crawl space floor, will be installed and sealed to the wall's air and moisture barrier in accordance with ASTM E1643 and manufacturer's recommendations

Ground moisture barrier will be fastened to ground in accordance with manufacturer's recommendations and extend a minimum of 6 inches up the foundation wall

Objective(s):

Reduce ground moisture entering the crawl space

Create a continuous and durable connection between the wall and ground air and moisture barriers

Before After
Uncovered crawl space floors can lead to moisture issues Ground moisture barrier should cover 100% of floor and at least 12" of walls

Materials:

  1. Plastic sheeting (at least 6 mil)
  2. Furring strips
  3. Fasteners
2.0403.2c - Material specification

Desired Outcome:

Durable, effective air barrier and ground moisture barrier provide ongoing access and minimize ground vapor

Specification(s):

A ground moisture barrier with a rating of no more than 0.1 perm will be used

A ground moisture barrier will be used that meets tear and puncture resistance standard ASTM E1745

Homeowner will be advised that all plastic is biodegradable and will have a life span much shorter than the home (5 years), and it will need replacing to remain effective

Objective(s):

Reduce ground vapor entering the crawl space

Ensure crawl space is accessible for service and maintenance without destroying the integrity of the moisture barrier

Best Practice
Barrier must be at least 6 mil, able to withstand puncture and last 10 yrs

Materials:

  1. Plastic sheeting (at least 6 mil)
  2. Furring strips
  3. Fasteners
2.0403.2d - Overlap seams

Desired Outcome:

Durable, effective air barrier and ground moisture barrier provide ongoing access and minimize ground vapor

Specification(s):

When seams exist, they will be overlapped a minimum of 12" with reverse or upslope lapping technique

For wall to floor connection, the wall moisture barrier will be installed under the ground moisture barrier

Objective(s):

Keep water under the liner

Before After
Ground moisture barriers help keep moisture from permeating floor Ground moisture barrier overlaps at least 12 inches and is securely fastened

Tools:

  1. Stapler
  2. Utility knife
  3. Drill

Materials:

  1. Ballast
  2. Plastic sheeting (at least 6 mil)
  3. Furring strips
  4. Moisture-resistant adhesive tape
Securely fasten moisture barrier to wall at least 6 inches from ground Overlap seams at least 12 inches, using a shingle method to keep water out
2.0403.2e - Fastening

Desired Outcome:

Durable, effective air barrier and ground moisture barrier provide ongoing access and minimize ground vapor

Specification(s):

When ground moisture barrier is installed on sloping ground, or accessed for routine maintenance or storage it will be fastened to the ground with durable fasteners or ballast(s)

Objective(s):

Prevent movement and uplift of the air barrier and ground moisture barrier

See 2.0403.1e - Fastening for Before and After photos along with Tools and Materials.

2.0403.2f - Sealing seams

Desired Outcome:

Durable, effective air barrier and ground moisture barrier provide ongoing access and minimize ground vapor

Specification(s):

A durable sealant compatible with the air barrier and ground moisture barrier will be used

Objective(s):

Maintain continuous air barrier and ground moisture barrier

Before After
Crawl spaces lacking moisture barrier risk moisture penetration of floor Ground moisture barriers in unvented spaces should be sealed

Tools:

  1. Utility knife

Materials:

  1. Moisture-resistant adhesive tape
Tape wall seams and press to ensure airtight bonding of adhesive Tape (overlapped) floor seams to prevent movement and water leakage

2.06 Electrical

2.0601 Knob and Tube Wiring

2.0601.1 Knob and Tube Wiring

2.0601.1a - Knob and tube identification

Note:

The authority having jurisdiction may require that a licensed professional perform certain tasks outlined in this detail

Desired Outcome:

Live unsafe wiring identified and brought to local codes

Specification(s):

Contractor, assessor, auditor, or similar will inspect and assess the house to identify knob and tube wiring

Objective(s):

Ensure occupant safety

Preserve the integrity and safety of the house

Knob and tube wiring should be identified before work begins Distinctive "knobs" are highlighted. This wiring can be a safety hazard
2.0601.1b - Live wire testing

Note:

The authority having jurisdiction may require that a licensed professional perform certain tasks outlined in this detail

Desired Outcome:

Live unsafe wiring identified and brought to local codes

Specification(s):

Non-contact testing method will be used to determine if wiring is live

Objective(s):

Protect occupant safety

Preserve the integrity and safety of the house

Before After
Knob & tube wiring needs to be tested to determine if still live. Red=live Live wiring should be dammed or professionally disabled before insulating

Tools:

  1. Non-contact wire tester
2.0601.1c - Isolation and protection - Approved Variance

Note:

The authority having jurisdiction may require that a licensed professional perform certain tasks outlined in this detail

Desired Outcome:

Live unsafe wiring identified and brought to local codes

Specification(s):

Proper clearance will be maintained around live knob and tube as required by the National Electrical Code (NEC) or authority having jurisdiction

When required, a dam that does not cover the top will be created to separate insulation from the wire path

The Nebraska State Electrical Board permits covering knob and tube wiring with insulation after the wiring has been appropriately covered to prevent direct contact with the insulation.

The covering must provide adequate air space (a minimum of 3 ½" clearance) for "cooling" of the wire.

The Nebraska Installation Standards will require:

  1. Contractor, assessor, auditor, or similar will inspect and assess the house to identify knob and tube wiring,
  2. Non-contact testing methods be used to determine if wiring is live,
  3. Attic areas with knob-and-tube wiring that are indicated as cost-effective for implementation on the energy audit be insulated after the wiring has been appropriately covered to prevent direct contact with the insulation and to provide adequate air space (a minimum of 3 ½," clearance) for "cooling" of the wire,
  4. Signs will be placed at all attic entries warning about the presence of knob and tube wiring,
  5. Appropriate shielding materials be used for concealing the knob-and-tube wiring will include gypsum board (5/8" or thicker), plywood or oriented strand board, and
  6. In attics where knob and tube wiring has been previously covered with insulation and where the energy audit indicates that it is cost-effective, additional insulation may be installed when the wiring is located and it has been determined that it is still live.

Once the wire locations are documented in the client file, the wiring may be appropriately shielded, as indicated above, to provide adequate air movement space for the "cooling" of the wire and insulated.

This determination may be completed by:

  1. a licensed electrician,
  2. the use of a thermal imager/scanner,
  3. visually or physically locating the wires, or
  4. another verifiable option determined by the subgrantee and approved by the Nebraska Energy Office.

In attic areas where knob and tube wiring penetrates the plane of the attic and extends up into a side or knee wall, a fire resistant baffling will be installed around the wire to provide sufficient space for air movement around the wire to provide adequate air space to accommodate the "cooling" of the wire.

See installation details at 4.1001.2 Knob and Tube Wiring.

If attic installation is being installed as per the directive above, the Nebraska State Electrical Board recommends the use of a licensed electrician for the installation of safety fuses as is indicated in the National Electrical Code. Existing fuses will remain intact if no insulation is being completed in the home.

Objective(s):

Ensure occupant safety

Preserve the integrity and safety of the house

Before After
Live knob & tube wiring may get hot and should not be insulated over Dams should be installed to hold back loose fill insulation

Tools:

  1. Drill
  2. Tape measure
  3. Non-contact wire tester

Materials:

  1. Plywood
  2. Drywall
  3. Fasteners
1 2
Have a certified electrician verify that wiring is safe to work around A sign should be posted at all entrances to warn of knob & tube wiring
3 4
Warning sign should remind to contact certified electrician for repairs Many jurisdictions require a sign in Spanish as well
5 6
Damming should extend above installed height of insulation With dams in place, insulation can begin
2.0601.1d - Replacement

Note:

The authority having jurisdiction may require that a licensed professional perform certain tasks outlined in this detail

Desired Outcome:

Live unsafe wiring identified and brought to local codes

Specification(s):

Exposed wiring will be replaced with new appropriate wiring in accordance with the NEC and local codes

Old wiring will be rendered inoperable by licensed electrician in accordance with the NEC and local codes

Objective(s):

Ensure occupant safety

Preserve the integrity and safety of the house

Before After
Knob and tube wiring may get hot and cannot be insulated over If possible, k&t wiring should be disabled and replaced with modern wiring

Tools:

  1. Non-contact wire tester

Materials:

  1. Romex as needed
1 2
The entire knob and tube system should be disabled Many electricians will remove old exposed wiring to prevent reactivation
3 4
With modern wiring in place and old k&t disabled, insulation can begin Exposed knob and tube should be replaced with modern wiring

2.0602 Electric Hazards

2.0602.1 Static Electric Shock

2.0602.1a - Rigid fill tube

Desired Outcome:

Prevention of static electric shock to the insulation installer when using rigid tubing

Specification(s):

Rigid fill tubes will be made of a material that will not hold an electric charge, such as Schedule 40 PVC Electrical Conduit, or be grounded

Objective(s):

Prevent injury to the installer

Best Practice
Rigid fill tubes should be low-conductivity and be grounded

Tools:

  1. Wrench

Materials:

  1. Couplers
  2. Schedule 40 PVC fill tube
  3. Grounding wire
  4. Grounding rod
Select rigid fill tubes that are low conductivity – Schedule 40 PVC fill tube Attach grounding wire to fill tubes to minimize shock risk
Attach grounding wire to rod with coupler Blow insulation
2.0602.1b - Metal coupler grounding

Desired Outcome:

Prevention of static electric shock to the insulation installer when using rigid tubing

Specification(s):

For an additional level of protection, the metal coupler on the hose will be connected to the grounding wire

Grounding wire will be connected to the grounding rod

Grounding rod will be driven into the ground a minimum of 8' when possible; grounding wire will be connected in compliance with local code and authority having jurisdiction

Objective(s):

Divert static discharge of electricity to ground instead of installer

Unsafe Best Practice
Ungrounded fill tubes can build up static electricity during insulation blowing Fill tubes should be grounded to prevent electric shock to workers

Tools:

  1. Sledgehammer
  2. Wrench

Materials:

  1. Grounding rod, at least 8 inches
  2. Grounding wire
  3. Metal coupler
  4. Grounding coupler
Copper grounding rod should be at least 8' long Grounding rod should be driven into the ground so that nearly all of rod is underground
Attach grounding wire to rod with coupler Attach grounding wire to fill tube
Blow in insulation with peace of mind that workers will not be electrocuted

2.07 Occupant Education and Access

2.0701 Basements and Crawl Spaces

2.0701.1 Crawl Spaces - Providing Access

2.0701.1a - Access

Desired Outcome:

Access to the closed crawl space is controlled and the ground moisture barrier is protected to maintain the integrity of the system

Specification(s):

Crawl space will be accessible in accordance with the IRC

Access to mechanical equipment located in the crawl space will be in accordance with IRC M1305.1.4

Service and maintenance of the crawl space and equipment will be performed without risk of damage to the thermal barrier, air barrier, and ground moisture barrier in accordance with IRC N1102.2.4 and IRC AF103.4.10

Objective(s):

Provide crawl space access

Maintain integrity of the crawl space system

2.0701.1b - Lock

Desired Outcome:

Access to the closed crawl space is controlled and the ground moisture barrier is protected to maintain the integrity of the system

Specification(s):

A lockable access will be provided if access is from the exterior

Objective(s):

Control access and prevent intruders

2.0701.2 Crawl Space Information Sign

2.0701.2a - Sign specifications

Desired Outcome:

Posted signs inside of the crawl space provide essential safety and maintenance information to occupant and users of the crawl space

Specification(s):

A durable, easily seen sign will be installed at all accesses inside of the crawl space (minimum 8 ½" x 11")

A minimum expected service life of 10 years will be ensured

Objective(s):

Prevent damage to the crawl space after upgrade

Best Practice Best Practice
Crawl space access points should have signage to alert occupant and workers Sign should be highly-visible, securely-fastened, and durable
2.0701.2b - Sign content

Desired Outcome:

Posted signs inside of the crawl space provide essential safety and maintenance information to occupant and users of the crawl space

Specification(s):

Those entering the crawl space will be cautioned not to damage the air barrier, ground moisture barrier, insulation, and mechanical components specific to the crawl space type

Anyone entering the crawl space will be alerted that immediate repairs are needed in case of damage

Installer contact information will be included on the sign in case there are questions or needs for repairs

Objective(s):

Prevent damage to the crawl space after upgrade

Educate anyone entering the crawl space

Provide occupants with a way to contact the installer

Best Practice Best Practice
Mount sign where clearly visible to anyone entering crawl space Be sure sign includes relevant information to aid occupant in repairs

Tools:

  1. Printer
  2. Staple gun

Materials:

  1. Paper
  2. Laminant
  3. Staples
Hacer la señal en español también
2.0701.2c - Hazard warning

Desired Outcome:

Posted signs inside of the crawl space provide essential safety and maintenance information to occupant and users of the crawl space

Specification(s):

Language prohibiting storage of hazardous and flammable materials will be provided on site

Objective(s):

Prevent storage of hazardous or flammable materials in the crawl space

Maintain indoor air quality

Prevent a fire hazard

Best Practice Best Practice
Mount sign where anyone entering the crawl space can see it Alert those entering the crawl space never to store hazardous materials

Tools:

  1. Staple gun
  2. Printer

Materials:

  1. Paper
  2. Laminant
  3. Staples
Hacer la señal en español también

2.0701.3 Crawl Space - Occupant Education

2.0701.3a - Written communication

Desired Outcome:

Occupants educated on the crawl space system and how to maintain it

Specification(s):

Occupants will be given written documentation that describes components of the system, maintenance requirements, and Health & Safety considerations at a minimum

Information will be provided in simple terms

Text and pictures will be used

Documentation may be provided electronically

Literacy levels and language of occupants will be considered in selecting appropriate materials

Objective(s):

Provide occupant with a basic understanding and documentation of the system, its maintenance, and related Health & Safety issues

2.0701.3b - Oral communication

Desired Outcome:

Occupants educated on the crawl space system and how to maintain it

Specification(s):

When possible, the written documents will be reviewed with the occupants

Objective(s):

Confirm that occupants have received the information

Provide an opportunity for questions and answers

2.0701.3c - Contact information

Desired Outcome:

Occupants educated on the crawl space system and how to maintain it

Specification(s):

Information about the installation company and warranty will be provided

Objective(s):

Provide occupants with a way to contact the installer

2.0702 Installed Equipment

2.0702.1 Warranty and Service Agreement

2.0702.1a - Warranty

Desired Outcome:

Occupants provided recourse for failures in materials, workmanship, and serviceability and informed of potential hazards

Specification(s):

A minimum 1-year warranty for materials, workmanship, and serviceability will be provided to occupants upon completion of work

Objective(s):

Provide recourse to occupants for failures in materials, workmanship, and serviceability

2.0702.1b - Warranty and Maintenance agreement - client education

Desired Outcome:

Occupants provided recourse for failures in materials, workmanship, and serviceability and informed of potential hazards

Specification(s):

Provide occupants with manufacturers' warranties on installed equipment and inform of installer maintenance agreement options

Share information on company related annual inspections and maintenance agreements as well as manufacturer related warranty details

Objective(s):

Ensure occupants are aware of warranty and maintenance agreement options

2.0702.1c - General conditions

Desired Outcome:

Occupants provided recourse for failures in materials, workmanship, and serviceability and informed of potential hazards

Specification(s):

At a minimum, the following concerns and warnings will be addressed within the warranty:

Objective(s):

Educate occupants on potential hazards

3 Air Sealing

3.10 Attics

3.1001 Penetrations and Chases

3.1001.1 Penetrations and Chases

3.1001.1a - Pre-inspection

Desired Outcome:

Penetrations and chases sealed to prevent air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and conditioned space

Specification(s):

An inspection will be conducted for mold, water leaks, and water damage before sealing a chase

Repairs will be completed before work

Objective(s):

Repair moisture-related issues

3.1001.1b - Backing and infill

Desired Outcome:

Penetrations and chases sealed to prevent air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and conditioned space

Specification(s):

Backing or infill will be provided as needed to meet the specific characteristics of the selected material and the characteristics of the hole

The infill or backing will not bend, sag, or move once installed

Objective(s):

Minimize hole size to ensure successful use of sealant

Ensure closure is permanent and supports any load (e.g., wind, insulation)

Ensure sealant does not fall out

3.1001.1c - Sealant selection

Desired Outcome:

Penetrations and chases sealed to prevent air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and conditioned space

Specification(s):

Sealants will be compatible with their intended surfaces

Sealants will allow for differential expansion and contraction between dissimilar materials

Sealants will be continuous and meet fire barrier specifications, according to authority having jurisdiction

Objective(s):

Select permanent sealant

Ensure sealant meets or exceeds the performance characteristics of the surrounding materials

3.1001.1d - High temperature application

Desired Outcome:

Penetrations and chases sealed to prevent air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and conditioned space

Specification(s):

Only non-combustible sealant will be used in contact with chimneys, vents, and flues

Local codes will be referenced

Objective(s):

Prevent a fire hazard

Before After
Gaps around combustion exhaust flues need to be sealed Sealed penetrations and chases should utilize high-temperature materials

Tools:

  1. Drill/screwdriver
  2. Caulk gun
  3. Metal snips

Materials:

  1. High-temperature caulking
  2. 26-gauge steel sheeting
1 2
Prepare work area by removing any insulation and debris Use high-temperature caulking (600F min)
3 4
Apply first ring of caulking to match shape of opening Apply second ring of caulking to size and shape of rigid material
5 6
Fasten rigid material (26-gauge steel) and apply additional caulking Fasten rigid material to cover penetration and seal against flue with caulk

3.1001.2 Chase Capping

3.1001.2a - Pre-inspection of chases

Desired Outcome:

Chase capped to prevent air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and conditioned space

Specification(s):

An inspection will be conducted for mold, water leaks, and water damage before sealing a chase

Repairs will be completed before work begins

Objective(s):

Repair moisture-related issues

3.1001.2b - Standard chase (interior walls covered with drywall or plaster)

Desired Outcome:

Chase capped to prevent air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and conditioned space

Specification(s):

Entire opening will be spanned with rigid material

Material will be cut to fit and fastened as required

Objective(s):

Reduce opening to what can be sealed with sealant

Before After
Unsealed standard chases covered with drywall can be leakage points The air barrier is be maintained by capping chases with rigid material

Tools:

  1. Drill/screwdriver
  2. Caulk gun

Materials:

  1. Drywall or other code approved rigid board material
  2. Caulk
  3. Sheet metal
  4. OSB or plywood
1 2
Clear area of debris and insulation in preparation for work Apply sealant all the way around opening
3 4
Fasten rigid material appropriately, such as with screws Trim rigid material, such as drywall, to size and place over sealant
3.1001.2c - Non-standard chase (interior walls covered with wood or paneling)

Desired Outcome:

Chase capped to prevent air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and conditioned space

Specification(s):

Material will be used that can be exposed to the interior of the house and meet the flame and smoke spread indexes as required in IRC

Objective(s):

Prevent a fire hazard

Before After
Paneled drop soffits typically are more combustible than plain drywall When sealing on attic side, drywall or other code approved rigid board materials are viable

Tools:

  1. Drywall saw
  2. Tape measure
  3. Caulk gun
  4. Drill

Materials:

  1. Drywall or other code approved rigid board material
  2. Fire-block sealant
  3. Fasteners
Sealing with drywall reduces overall combustibility of paneled chases
3.1001.2d - Support

Desired Outcome:

Chase capped to prevent air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and conditioned space

Specification(s):

Support material will be installed for spans wider than 24", except when air barrier material is rated to span greater distance under load (e.g., wind, insulation)

Objective(s):

Ensure seal stays in place and does not sag

Before After
Spans greater than 24 inches require additional bracing before capping Support should prevent cap from sagging or moving

Tools:

  1. Drill
  2. Saw
  3. Tape measure

Materials:

  1. Lumber
  2. Drywall
  3. Fasteners
Create bracing to support spans larger than 24", either from above or below When supporting from above, apply adhesive between drywall and bracing
Bracing can be screwed to drywall before capping chase Ensure new bracing is secure by using screws to fasten to joist
Once chase is capped, it is now ready to be sealed along framing
3.1001.2e - Joint seal

Desired Outcome:

Chase capped to prevent air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and conditioned space

Specification(s):

Continuous seal will be installed around seams, cracks, joints, edges, penetrations, and connections

Objective(s):

Provide airtight, durable seal that does not move, bend, or sag

Before After
Chases need to be capped and sealed to prevent leakage Chase is sealed along all cracks, gaps, and penetrations

Tools:

  1. Spray foam gun
  2. Caulk gun

Materials:

  1. Spray foam
  2. Caulk
1 2
Chase has been capped but needs to be sealed Sealant is used to fill in all cracks and gaps along edges of chase cap
3
Cap is sealed
3.1001.2f - Adjacent framing

Desired Outcome:

Chase capped to prevent air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and conditioned space

Specification(s):

All remaining gaps at the top of the chase will be sealed

Objective(s):

Ensure airtight seal from one finished side of the chase to the other

Before After
Chases need to be capped and sealed to prevent leakage Chase is sealed along all cracks, gaps, and penetrations

Tools:

  1. Spray foam gun
  2. Caulk gun

Materials:

  1. Spray foam
  2. Caulk
1 2
Sealant is used to fill in all cracks and gaps along edges of chase cap Extend seal along adjacent framing

3.1001.3 Walls Open to Attic-Balloon Framing and Double Walls

3.1001.3a - Pre-inspection

Desired Outcome:

Continuous air barrier prevents air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and conditioned space

Specification(s):

An inspection will be conducted for mold, water leaks, and water damage before sealing a dropped ceiling or soffit

Repairs will be completed before work begins

Objective(s):

Repair moisture-related issues

3.1001.3b - Sealing methods

Desired Outcome:

Continuous air barrier prevents air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and conditioned space

Specification(s):

Entire opening will be spanned with rigid material in line with the ceiling level

Material will be cut to fit and fastened as required

Or

Wall below openings will be dense packed

Or

Wall below openings will be bridged and sealed with spray polyurethane foam (SPF)

Sealants will be used that prevent visible air movement using chemical smoke at 50 pascals of pressure difference

Objective(s):

Prevent air leakage from wall cavity to attic

Before After
Wall cavities are open to attic Whatever option chosen, test for visible air movement with smoke pencil

Tools:

  1. Utility knife
  2. Saw
  3. Insulation machine
  4. Caulk gun
  5. Spray foam gun

Materials:

  1. Drywall or other code approved rigid board material
  2. Spray foam
  3. Caulk
  4. Fasteners
  5. Dense packable insulation
  6. Lumber
Option 1: Dense pack cavities through wood cap fastened in place Option 2: Bridge cavities with spray foam
Option 3, Step 1: Apply sealant around opening and on surrounding framing Option 3, Step 2: Cap with drywall and seal exposed joints
3.1001.3c - Support

Desired Outcome:

Continuous air barrier prevents air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and conditioned space

Specification(s):

Support material will be installed for spans wider than 24", except when air barrier material is rated to span greater distance under load (e.g., wind, insulation)

Objective(s):

Ensure seal stays in place and does not sag

Before After
Spans greater than 24 inches require additional bracing before capping Support should prevent cap from sagging or moving

Tools:

  1. Saw
  2. Drill
  3. Tape measure

Materials:

  1. Lumber
  2. Drywall
  3. Fasteners
Create bracing to support spans larger than 24", either from above or below When supporting from above, apply adhesive between drywall and bracing
Bracing can be screwed to drywall before capping chase Ensure new bracing is secure by using screws to fasten to joist
Once chase is capped, it is now ready to be sealed along framing
3.1001.3d - Joint seal

Desired Outcome:

Continuous air barrier prevents air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and conditioned space

Specification(s):

Continuous seal will be installed around seams, cracks, joints, edges, penetrations, and connections

Objective(s):

Provide airtight, durable seal that does not move, bend, or sag

Before After
Balloon framing needs to be capped and sealed to prevent leakage All edges of the cap should be sealed to surrounding surfaces

Tools:

  1. Spray foam gun
  2. Caulk gun

Materials:

  1. Spray foam
  2. Caulk
For rigid material applications, extend sealant along all seams Extend sealant or SPF along joist to seal all gaps
3.1001.3e - Adjacent framing

Desired Outcome:

Continuous air barrier prevents air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and conditioned space

Specification(s):

All remaining gaps at the top of the opening will be sealed

Or

All remaining gaps at the top of the chase will be sealed

Objective(s):

Ensure airtight seal from one finished side of the wall assembly to the other

Before After
Balloon framing needs to be capped and sealed to prevent leakage All edges of the cap should be sealed to surrounding surfaces, including adjacent framing

Tools:

  1. Spray foam gun
  2. Caulk gun

Materials:

  1. Spray foam (SPF)
  2. Caulk
For rigid material applications, sealant should be applied to framing When using SPF to bridge cavity, extend SPF along joist and adjacent framing

3.1002 Open Stairwells

3.1002.1 Interior with Sloped Ceiling

3.1002.1a - Pre-inspection

Desired Outcome:

Stairwells sealed to prevent air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and conditioned space

Specification(s):

An inspection will be conducted for mold, water leaks, and water damage before sealing an open stairwell

Repairs will be completed before work begins

Objective(s):

Repair moisture-related issues

3.1002.1b - Standard void over stairwell (15-minute fire-rated material; e.g., gypsum lined)

Desired Outcome:

Stairwells sealed to prevent air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and conditioned space

Specification(s):

Entire opening will be spanned with rigid material

Material will be cut to fit and fastened as required

Objective(s):

Prevent air leakage from wall to attic

Reduce opening to what can be sealed with sealant

Support load as required (e.g., wind, insulation)

3.1002.1c - Non-standard void over stairwell (surfaces around void are not 15-minute fire-rated (e.g., bookcases, chest of drawers), or lined with paneling

Desired Outcome:

Stairwells sealed to prevent air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and conditioned space

Specification(s):

Material will be used that can be exposed to the interior of the house

Objective(s):

Prevent a fire hazard

3.1002.1d - Support

Desired Outcome:

Stairwells sealed to prevent air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and conditioned space

Specification(s):

Support material will be installed for spans wider than 24", except when air barrier material is rated to span greater distance under load (e.g., wind, insulation)

Objective(s):

Ensure seal stays in place and does not sag

3.1002.1e - Joint seal

Desired Outcome:

Stairwells sealed to prevent air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and conditioned space

Specification(s):

Continuous seal will be installed around seams, cracks, joints, edges, penetrations, and connections

Objective(s):

Provide airtight, durable seal that does not move, bend, or sag

3.1002.1f - Perimeter sealing

Desired Outcome:

Stairwells sealed to prevent air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and conditioned space

Specification(s):

Air barrier will be extended on all four sides from finished ceiling or existing framing to the new barrier

Access will be gained as needed (e.g., pull flooring)

Objective(s):

Create a continuous air barrier

3.1002.2 Stairwell to Attic - Door at Bottom with No Ceiling Above

3.1002.2a - Pre-inspection

Desired Outcome:

Stairwell sealed to prevent air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and the conditioned space

Specification(s):

An inspection will be conducted for mold, water leaks, and water damage before sealing an open stairwell

Repairs will be completed before work begins

Objective(s):

Repair moisture-related issues

3.1002.2b - Option 1: bring stairwell inside

Desired Outcome:

Stairwell sealed to prevent air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and the conditioned space

Specification(s):

Materials will be installed in line with the ceiling level with an airtight and operable insulated panel weighing no more than 15 pounds, or a pre-fabricated kit may be used for repeated access

Or

Airtight seal will be provided between level of new closure or cap and interior ceiling around perimeter

Access will be gained as needed (e.g., pull flooring)

Objective(s):

Prevent air leakage through stairwell between conditioned space and attic

Ensure the insulated panel is lightweight and easy for the occupant to use on an ongoing basis

Support insulation

Bring the stairwell inside of the thermal boundary

Ensure the new closure ties into the existing air barrier on all sides

3.1002.2c - Option 2: Keep stairwell outside

Desired Outcome:

Stairwell sealed to prevent air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and the conditioned space

Specification(s):

An air barrier will be created and insulation material will be continuously installed across all surfaces of stairwell, including weather-stripped and insulated doors

Or

All cavities between stairs and conditioned space will be insulated and tested to resist air flow (e.g., walls, floors, landings, under stairs)

Door will be weather-stripped and insulated

Or

A combination of the above methods can be used

Objective(s):

Prevent air leakage

Provide continuous thermal boundary

Maximize thermal performance

3.1002.2d - Support

Desired Outcome:

Stairwell sealed to prevent air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and the conditioned space

Specification(s):

Support material will be installed for spans wider than 24", except when air barrier material is rated to span greater distance under load (e.g., wind, insulation)

Objective(s):

Ensure seal stays in place and does not sag

3.1002.2e - Joint seal

Desired Outcome:

Stairwell sealed to prevent air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and the conditioned space

Specification(s):

Continuous, airtight seals will be provided around seams, cracks, joints, edges, penetrations, and connections

Objective(s):

Provide airtight, durable seal that does not move, bend, or sag

3.1002.2f - Perimeter sealing

Desired Outcome:

Stairwell sealed to prevent air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and the conditioned space

Specification(s):

Air barrier will be extended on all four sides from finished ceiling or from existing framing to the new barrier

Access will be gained as needed (e.g., pull flooring)

Objective(s):

Create a continuous air barrier

3.1002.3 Stairwell to Attic - Door at Top with Finished Ceiling Above

3.1002.3a - Pre-inspection

Desired Outcome:

Stairwell is sealed to prevent air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and conditioned space

Specification(s):

An inspection will be conducted for mold, water leaks, and water damage before sealing an open stairwell

Repairs will be completed before work begins

Objective(s):

Repair moisture-related issues

3.1002.3b - Option 1: Bring stairwell inside

Desired Outcome:

Stairwell is sealed to prevent air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and conditioned space

Specification(s):

An airtight seal will be provided between level of new closure or cap and interior ceiling around perimeter

Access will be gained as needed (e.g., pull flooring)

Or

An air barrier will be created and insulation material will be continuously installed across all surfaces of stairwell, including weather-stripped and insulated doors

Or

All cavities between stairs and conditioned space will be insulated and tested to resist air flow (e.g., walls, floors, landings, under stairs)

Door will be weather-stripped and insulated

Or

A combination of the above methods can be used

Objective(s):

Reduce air leakage

Provide continuous thermal boundary

Maximize thermal performance

3.1002.3c - Support

Desired Outcome:

Stairwell is sealed to prevent air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and conditioned space

Specification(s):

Support material will be installed for spans wider than 24", except when air barrier material is rated to span greater distance under load (e.g., wind, insulation)

Objective(s):

Ensure seal stays in place and does not sag

3.1002.3d - Joint seal

Desired Outcome:

Stairwell is sealed to prevent air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and conditioned space

Specification(s):

Continuous, airtight seals will be provided around seams, cracks, joints, edges, penetrations, and connections

Objective(s):

Provide airtight, durable seal that does not move, bend, or sag

3.1002.3e - Perimeter sealing

Desired Outcome:

Stairwell is sealed to prevent air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and conditioned space

Specification(s):

Air barrier will be extended on all four sides from finished ceiling or existing framing to the new barrier

Access will be gained as needed (e.g., pull flooring)

Objective(s):

Create a continuous air barrier

3.1003 Dropped Ceilings and Soffits

3.1003.1 New Ceiling Below Original - Old Ceiling Intact or repairable

3.1003.1a - Pre-inspection

Desired Outcome:

Continuous air barrier prevents air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and conditioned space

Specification(s):

An inspection will be conducted for mold, water leaks, and water damage before sealing a dropped ceiling or soffit

Repairs will be completed before work begins

Objective(s):

Repair moisture-related issues

3.1003.1b - Sealing methods

Desired Outcome:

Continuous air barrier prevents air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and conditioned space

Specification(s):

Entire opening will be spanned with rigid material in line with the ceiling level

Material will be cut to fit and fastened as required

Or

Side of stud bays will be sealed with rigid material from bottom of dropped ceiling to top-plate

Or

Wall below openings will be dense packed

Or

Wall below openings will be bridged and sealed with SPF

Seals will be used that prevent visible air movement using chemical smoke at 50 pascals of pressure difference

Objective(s):

Prevent air leakage from dropped ceiling to attic

Before After
Damage to an older ceiling reveals the new ceiling below Rigid material sealed in place creates an air barrier

Tools:

  1. Utility knife
  2. Saw
  3. Drill
  4. Insulation machine
  5. Caulk gun
  6. Spray foam gun
  7. Tape measure

Materials:

  1. Caulk sealant
  2. Drywall or other code approved rigid board material
  3. Spray foam
  4. Fasteners
  5. Dense packable insulation
  6. Wrapped fiberglass batts
Prepare work area by removing existing insulation and debris Option 1, Step 1: Run a bead of sealant around damage in old ceiling
Option 1, Step 2: Cover openings with code approved rigid board material or drywall Option 2: Seal with rigid material along face of stud cavities
Option 3: Dense pack cavities through fastened wood plate Option 4: Bridge cavities at new ceiling level with wrapped batts and SPF
Whatever option chosen, test with chemical smoke to verify no leakage
3.1003.1c - Support

Desired Outcome:

Continuous air barrier prevents air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and conditioned space

Specification(s):

Support material will be installed for spans wider than 24", except when air barrier material is rated to span greater distance under load (e.g., wind, insulation)

Objective(s):

Ensure seal stays in place and does not sag

Before After
Spans greater than 24 inches require additional bracing before capping Support should prevent cap from sagging or moving

Tools:

  1. Saw
  2. Drill
  3. Tape measure

Materials:

  1. Lumber
  2. Drywall
  3. Fasteners
Create bracing to support spans larger than 24", either from above or below When supporting from above, apply adhesive between drywall and bracing
Ensure new bracing is secure by using screws to fasten to joist Bracing can be screwed to drywall before capping chase
Once chase is capped, it is now ready to be sealed along framing
3.1003.1d - Joint Seal

Desired Outcome:

Continuous air barrier prevents air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and conditioned space

Specification(s):

Continuous seal will be installed around seams, cracks, joints, edges, penetrations, and connections

Objective(s):

Provide airtight, durable seal that does not move, bend, or sag

Before After
Damage to an old ceiling reveals a newer ceiling below No gaps should remain after sealant is applied

Tools:

  1. Spray foam gun
  2. Caulk gun

Materials:

  1. Caulk
  2. Spray foam
1 2
Apply sealant to surrounding surfaces before setting cap in place Sealant should extend along joists and into seams at top plates
3
Once cap is set, apply sealant to remaining gaps and along all seams
3.1003.1e - Adjacent framing

Desired Outcome:

Continuous air barrier prevents air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and conditioned space

Specification(s):

All remaining gaps will be sealed at the top of the dropped ceiling

Or

All remaining gaps at the top of the chase will be sealed

Objective(s):

Provide airtight framing from one finished side of the dropped ceiling to the other

Before After
Damage to an older ceiling reveals the new ceiling below No gaps should remain after spray foam is applied

Tools:

  1. Caulk gun
  2. Spray foam gun

Materials:

  1. Spray foam
  2. Caulk sealant
1 2
Caulk along all joists before setting cap Use sealant to fill all remaining gaps

3.1003.2 Ceiling Leaks Not Repairable - No Air Barrier Above

3.1003.2a - Pre-inspection

Desired Outcome:

Continuous air barrier prevents air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and conditioned space

Specification(s):

An inspection will be conducted for mold, water leaks, and water damage before sealing a dropped ceiling or soffit

Repairs will be completed before work begins

Objective(s):

Repair moisture-related issues

3.1003.2b - Sealing methods

Desired Outcome:

Continuous air barrier prevents air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and conditioned space

Specification(s):

Ceiling or roof and wall air and thermal barriers will be connected with a rigid airtight connection around the perimeter

Or

If ceiling will support an air barrier and insulation, a rigid airtight barrier (e.g., gypsum) will be attached to current ceiling either above or below

Or

Intermediate framing will be used to support air and thermal barrier

Or

Rigid airtight thermal barrier will be installed at the roof sheathing

Seals will be used that prevent visible air movement using chemical smoke at 50 pascals of pressure difference

Objective(s):

Prevent air leakage from dropped ceiling to attic

3.1003.2c - Support

Desired Outcome:

Continuous air barrier prevents air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and conditioned space

Specification(s):

Support material will be installed for spans wider than 24", except when air barrier material is rated to span greater distance under load (e.g., wind, insulation)

Objective(s):

Ensure seal stays in place and does not sag

Before After
Spans greater than 24 inches require additional bracing before capping Support should prevent cap from sagging or moving

Tools:

  1. Drill
  2. Saw
  3. Tape measure

Materials:

  1. Lumber
  2. Drywall
  3. Fasteners
Create bracing to support spans larger than 24", either from above or below When supporting from above, apply adhesive between drywall and bracing
Bracing can be screwed to drywall before capping chase Ensure new bracing is secure by using screws to fasten to joist
Once chase is capped, it is now ready to be sealed along framing
3.1003.2d - Joint seal

Desired Outcome:

Continuous air barrier prevents air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and conditioned space

Specification(s):

Continuous seal will be installed around seams, cracks, joints, edges, penetrations, and connections

Objective(s):

Provide airtight, durable seal that does not move, bend, or sag

Before After
Dropped soffits need to be capped and sealed to prevent leakage No gaps should remain after sealant is applied

Tools:

  1. Caulk gun
  2. Spray foam gun

Materials:

  1. Spray foam
  2. Caulk
1 2
Apply sealant to surrounding surfaces before setting cap in place Sealant should extend along surround joist and into seams at top plates
3
Once cap is set, apply sealant to remaining gaps and along all seams
3.1003.2e - Adjacent framing

Desired Outcome:

Continuous air barrier prevents air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and conditioned space

Specification(s):

All remaining gaps will be sealed at the top of the dropped ceiling

Or

All remaining gaps at the top of the chase will be sealed

Objective(s):

Provide airtight framing from one finished side of the dropped ceiling to the other

Before After
Dropped soffits need to be capped and sealed to prevent leakage No gaps should remain after sealant is applied along adjacent framing

Tools:

  1. Caulk gun
  2. Spray foam gun

Materials:

  1. Spray foam
  2. Caulk sealant
1 2
Sealant should have been along all joists and adjacent framing before cap was set Additional sealant should fill in all remaining gaps after cap has been set

3.1003.3 Above Closets and Tubs

3.1003.3a - Pre-inspection

Desired Outcome:

Continuous air barrier prevents air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and conditioned space

Specification(s):

An inspection will be conducted for mold, water leaks, and water damage before sealing a dropped ceiling or soffit

Repairs will be completed before work begins

Objective(s):

Repair moisture-related issues

3.1003.3b - Above closets and tubs

Desired Outcome:

Continuous air barrier prevents air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and conditioned space

Specification(s):

Entire opening will be spanned with rigid material in line with the ceiling level

Material will be cut to fit and fastened as required

Or

Side of stud bays will be sealed with rigid material from bottom of dropped ceiling to top-plate

Or

Wall below openings will be dense packed

Or

Wall below openings will be bridged and sealed with SPF

Seals will be used that prevent visible air movement using chemical smoke at 50 pascals of pressure difference

Objective(s):

Prevent air leakage from dropped ceiling to attic

Before After
Unsealed drop soffits over tubs and closets can be a point of leakage Capped soffits minimize leakage to and from unconditioned spaces

Tools:

  1. Utility knife
  2. Saw
  3. Tape measure
  4. Insulation machine
  5. Drill
  6. Caulk gun
  7. Spray foam gun
  8. Smoke pencil

Materials:

  1. Drywall or other code approved rigid board material
  2. Plywood
  3. Caulk
  4. Spray foam
  5. Dense packable insulation
  6. Fasteners
  7. Wrapped fiberglass batts
Option 1, Step 1: Apply sealant to top-plates or other relevant surfaces Option 1, Step 2: Cover face of stud bay with code approved rigid board material or drywall
Option 1, Step 3: Secure the rigid material with screws Option 2: Cover face of stud bay with code approved rigid board material, such as plywood
Option 3: Dense pack cavity through fastened wood cap Option 4: Bridge stud bay with wrapped fiberglass and spray foam
All Options: Test with smoke pencil to verify no air movement
3.1003.3c - Support

Desired Outcome:

Continuous air barrier prevents air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and conditioned space

Specification(s):

Support material will be installed for spans wider than 24", except when air barrier material is rated to span greater distance under load (e.g., wind, insulation)

Objective(s):

Ensure seal stays in place and does not sag

Before After
Spans greater than 24 inches require additional bracing before capping Support should prevent cap from sagging or moving

Tools:

  1. Drill
  2. Saw
  3. Tape measure

Materials:

  1. Lumber
  2. Drywall
  3. Fasteners
Create bracing to support spans larger than 24", either from above or below When supporting from above, apply adhesive between drywall and bracing
Bracing can be screwed to drywall before capping chase Ensure new bracing is secure by using screws to fasten to joist
Once chase is capped, it is now ready to be sealed along framing
3.1003.3d - Joint seal

Desired Outcome:

Continuous air barrier prevents air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and conditioned space

Specification(s):

Continuous seal will be installed around seams, cracks, joints, edges, penetrations, and connections

Objective(s):

Provide airtight, durable seal that does not move, bend, or sag

Before After
Uninsulated soffits can cause leakage to and from unconditioned spaces No gaps should remain after spray foam is applied

Tools:

  1. Caulk gun
  2. Spray foam gun

Materials:

  1. Caulk
  2. Spray foam
1 2
Caulk surrounding surfaces before setting cap in place Sealant should extend along surround joist and into seams at top plates
3
Once cap is set, apply sealant to remaining gaps and along all seams
3.1003.3e - Adjacent framing

Desired Outcome:

Continuous air barrier prevents air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and conditioned space

Specification(s):

All remaining gaps at the top of the dropped ceiling will be sealed

Objective(s):

Provide airtight framing from one finished side of the dropped ceiling to the other

Before After
Dropped soffits need to be capped and sealed to prevent leakage No gaps should remain after sealant is applied along adjacent framing

Tools:

  1. Caulk gun
  2. Spray foam gun

Materials:

  1. Caulk sealant
  2. Spray foam
1 2
Apply sealant to surrounding surfaces before setting cap in place Sealant should extend along adjacent framing and into seams at top plates
3
Additional sealant should fill in all remaining gaps after cap has been set

3.1003.4 Dropped Ceilings

3.1003.4a - Pre-inspection

Desired Outcome:

Continuous air barrier prevents air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and conditioned space

Specification(s):

An inspection will be conducted for mold, water leaks, and water damage before sealing a dropped ceiling or soffit

Repairs will be completed before work begins

Objective(s):

Repair moisture-related issues

3.1003.4b - Sealing methods

Desired Outcome:

Continuous air barrier prevents air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and conditioned space

Specification(s):

Entire opening will be spanned with rigid material installed in line with the ceiling level

Material will be cut to fit and fastened as required

Or

Side of stud bays will be sealed with rigid material from bottom of dropped ceiling to top-plate

Or

Wall below openings will be dense packed

Or

Wall below openings will be bridged and sealed with SPF

Seals will be used that prevent visible air movement using chemical smoke at 50 pascals of pressure difference

Objective(s):

Prevent air leakage from dropped ceiling to attic

3.1003.4c - Support

Desired Outcome:

Continuous air barrier prevents air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and conditioned space

Specification(s):

Support material will be installed for spans wider than 24", except when air barrier material is rated to span greater distance under load (e.g., wind, insulation)

Objective(s):

Ensure seal stays in place and does not sag

Before After
Spans greater than 24 inches require additional bracing before capping Support should prevent cap from sagging or moving

Tools:

  1. Saw
  2. Drill
  3. Tape measure

Materials:

  1. Lumber
  2. Drywall
  3. Fasteners
Create bracing to support spans larger than 24", either from above or below When supporting from above, apply adhesive between drywall and bracing
Bracing can be screwed to drywall before capping chase Ensure new bracing is secure by using screws to fasten to joist
Once chase is capped, it is now ready to be sealed along framing
3.1003.4d - Joint seal

Desired Outcome:

Continuous air barrier prevents air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and conditioned space

Specification(s):

Continuous seal will be installed around seams, cracks, joints, edges, penetrations, and connections

Pre-fabricated units may be used when meeting the desired outcome

Objective(s):

Provide airtight, durable seal that does not move, bend or sag

Before After
Dropped soffits need to be capped and sealed to prevent leakage No gaps should remain after spray foam is applied

Tools:

  1. Spray foam gun
  2. Caulk gun

Materials:

  1. Spray foam
  2. Caulk sealant
1 2
Caulk surrounding surfaces before setting cap in place Sealant should extend along surround joist and into seams at top plates
3
Once cap is set, apply sealant to remaining gaps and along all seams
3.1003.4e - Adjacent framing

Desired Outcome:

Continuous air barrier prevents air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and conditioned space

Specification(s):

All remaining gaps will be sealed at the top of the dropped ceiling

Or

All remaining gaps at the top of the chase will be sealed

Objective(s):

Provide airtight framing from one finished side of the dropped ceiling to the other

Before After
Dropped soffits need to be capped and sealed to prevent leakage No gaps should remain after sealant is applied along adjacent framing

Tools:

  1. Spray foam gun
  2. Caulk gun

Materials:

  1. Spray foam
  2. Caulk
1 2
Sealant should have been along all joists and framing before cap was set Additional sealant should fill in all remaining gaps after cap has been set

3.1003.5 Dropped Ceiling with Light Boxes and Fixtures

3.1003.5a - Pre-inspection

Desired Outcome:

Sealed light boxes safely prevent air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and conditioned space

Specification(s):

An inspection will be conducted for mold, water leaks, and water damage before sealing a dropped ceiling or soffit

Repairs will be completed before work begins

Objective(s):

Repair moisture-related issues

3.1003.5b - Light boxes (e.g., fluorescent lights)

Desired Outcome:

Sealed light boxes safely prevent air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and conditioned space

Specification(s):

An airtight seal will be provided around perimeter between light box enclosure and interior ceiling

All seams and penetrations of the enclosure will be sealed

Access will be gained as needed (e.g., pull flooring)

Seals will be used that prevent visible air movement using chemical smoke at 50 pascals of pressure difference

Objective(s):

Prevent air leakage

3.1003.5c - Non-insulation contact (IC) rated recessed lights

Desired Outcome:

Sealed light boxes safely prevent air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and conditioned space

Specification(s):

Insulation will be kept at least 3 inches away from the top and side of any fixtures

If dropped ceiling is to be filled with insulation, then a sealed rigid barrier enclosure will be installed to maintain a 3 inches clearance on all sides

Top of rigid barrier enclosure will be sealed with non-insulating rigid material (e.g., gypsum or equivalent perm rating and R-value)

Objective(s):

Prevent light fixture from overheating

Bring light fixture inside of the air barrier

3.1003.6 Dropped Soffits

3.1003.6a - Pre-inspection

Desired Outcome:

Dropped soffits sealed to prevent air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and conditioned space

Specification(s):

An inspection will be conducted for mold, water leaks, and water damage before sealing a dropped ceiling or soffit

Repairs will be completed before work begins

Objective(s):

Repair moisture-related issues

3.1003.6b - Soffit general

Desired Outcome:

Dropped soffits sealed to prevent air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and conditioned space

Specification(s):

Air flow will be blocked at soffit in locations where access allows

Objective(s):

Provide continuous air barrier across soffit openings

Before After
Accessible drop soffits should be sealed to prevent heat gain/loss Completely sealed drop soffits and chases minimize heat transfer

Tools:

  1. Measuring tape
  2. Utility knife
  3. Caulk gun
  4. Spray foam gun
  5. Saw
  6. Drill

Materials:

  1. Caulk
  2. Spray foam
  3. Lumber
  4. Drywall or other code approved rigid board material
  5. Fasteners

There is a variety of ways to seal soffits. Please examine 3.1003.6c and 3.1003.6d for more information.

3.1003.6c - Option 1: Bring soffit inside (seal at top)

Desired Outcome:

Dropped soffits sealed to prevent air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and conditioned space

Specification(s):

Entire opening will be spanned with rigid material in line with the ceiling level

Material will be cut to fit and fastened as required

Objective(s):

Prevent air leakage from wall to attic

Reduce opening to what can be sealed with sealant

Ensure closure is permanent and supports any load (e.g., wind, insulation)

Bring soffit into thermal boundary

Before After
Standard soffits are often open to the attic and uninsulated Rigid material encloses the soffit into the conditioned living space

Tools:

  1. Drill/screwdriver
  2. Caulk gun

Materials:

  1. Drywall
  2. Sealant
1 2
Soffits open to the attic need to be sealed to maintain air barrier Apply sealant along top plates
3 4
Cap soffit with rigid material, such as drywall, cut to size Fasten cap with screws to set sealant and create air barrier
5
Insulate over now-capped soffit
3.1003.6d - Option 2: Leave soffit outside (seal at bottom or side)

Desired Outcome:

Dropped soffits sealed to prevent air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and conditioned space

Specification(s):

Each stud bay will be spanned with rigid material will be cut to fit and fastened as required

Or

Backing at each stud bay will be provided and will be sealed

Or

Side of stud bays will be sealed with rigid material from bottom of soffit to top-plate

Or

A sealed rigid barrier will be installed at all transitions

Objective(s):

Prevent air leakage from wall to soffit

Reduce opening to what can be sealed with sealant

Ensure soffit is outside of the thermal boundary

Before After
Wall cavities are open to attic and heat transfer due to dropped soffit Wall cavities capped and air-sealed in one of a variety of options

Tools:

  1. Tape measure
  2. Utility knife
  3. Saw
  4. Insulation machine
  5. Drill
  6. Caulk gun
  7. Spray foam gun

Materials:

  1. Drywall
  2. Plywood
  3. Lumber
  4. Fasteners
  5. Caulk
  6. Spray foam
  7. Dense packable insulation
  8. Poly-wrapped insulation
Clear work area of insulation and debris Option 1: Span each stud bay with rigid material at level of soffit
Option 2: Backing used to fill bays and sealed with spray foam Option 3: Stud bay will faced with rigid material, fastened and sealed
3.1003.6e - Soffits containing non-IC rated recessed lights

Desired Outcome:

Dropped soffits sealed to prevent air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and conditioned space

Specification(s):

Insulation will be kept at least 3" away from the top and side of any fixtures

If dropped soffit is to be filled with insulation, then a sealed rigid barrier enclosure will be installed to maintain a 3" clearance around the entire fixture

Top of rigid barrier enclosure will be sealed with non-insulating rigid material (e.g., gypsum or equivalent perm rating and R-value)

Objective(s):

Prevent light fixture from overheating

Bring light fixture inside of the air barrier

3.1004 Cathedralized Attic Ceilings

3.1004.1 Cathedralized Attic Air Sealing (Insulation Installed at Roof Deck)

3.1004.1a - Pre-inspection

Desired Outcome:

Cathedralized attics sealed to prevent air leakage

Specification(s):

An inspection will be conducted for mold, water leaks, and water damage before sealing a cathedralized ceiling

Repairs will be completed before work begins

Objective(s):

Repair moisture-related issues

3.1004.1b - Backing and infill

Desired Outcome:

Cathedralized attics sealed to prevent air leakage

Specification(s):

Backing or infill will be provided as needed to meet the specific characteristics of the selected material and the characteristics of the open space

The infill or backing will not bend, sag, or move once installed

Objective(s):

Minimize hole size to ensure successful use of sealant

Ensure closure is permanent and supports any load (e.g., wind, insulation)

Ensure sealant does not fall out

3.1004.1c - Sealant selection

Desired Outcome:

Cathedralized attics sealed to prevent air leakage

Specification(s):

Sealants will be compatible with their intended surfaces

Sealants will allow for differential expansion and contraction between dissimilar materials

Sealants will be continuous and meet fire barrier specifications, according to authority having jurisdiction

Objective(s):

Select permanent sealant

Ensure sealant meets or exceeds the performance characteristics of the surrounding materials

3.1005 Other Ceiling Materials

3.1005.1 Tongue and Groove Ceilings

3.1005.1a - Pre-inspection

Desired Outcome:

Tongue and groove ceilings sealed to prevent air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and conditioned space

Specification(s):

An inspection will be conducted for mold, water leaks, and water damage before sealing a tongue and groove ceiling

Repairs will be completed before work

Objective(s):

Repair moisture-related issues

3.1005.1b - Backing

Desired Outcome:

Tongue and groove ceilings sealed to prevent air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and conditioned space

Specification(s):

Backing will be installed behind tongue and groove ceilings

Objective(s):

Prevent air leakage and allow for sealants

3.1005.1c - Sealant selection

Desired Outcome:

Tongue and groove ceilings sealed to prevent air leakage and moisture movement between the attic and conditioned space

Specification(s):

Sealants will be compatible with their intended surfaces

Sealants will be continuous and meet fire barrier specifications, according to authority having jurisdiction

No sealant will be allowed to be visible in the living space

Objective(s):

Select permanent sealant

Ensure sealant meets or exceeds the performance characteristics of the surrounding materials

Ensure ceiling remains aesthetically pleasing

3.12 Windows and Doors

3.1201 Maintenance, Repair, and Sealing

3.1201.1 Double-Hung Wood Windows

3.1201.1a - Lead paint assessment

Desired Outcome:

Windows operable and weather tight; improved energy efficiency performance of fenestration

Specification(s):

Presence of lead-based paint in pre-1978 homes will be assumed unless testing confirms otherwise

EPA's renovation, repair and Painting (RRP) Program rule (40 CFR Part 745) in pre-1978 homes and proposed changes to this rule (Federal register/Vol. 75, No. 87/May 6, 2010) will be complied with, to be superseded by any subsequent final rulemaking or any more stringent state or federal standards

Objective(s):

Protect worker and occupant from potential lead hazards

Best Practice
In homes built before 1978, test paint before beginning renovation

Tools:

  1. Note: Mask must be worn during testing
  2. LeadCheck test kit
  3. Utility knife
  4. Camera

EPA RRP certification required to conduct Lead Paint Assessment.

See 2.0100.1p - Lead paint assessment for steps and photos.

3.1201.1b - Weather-stripping

Desired Outcome:

Windows operable and weather tight; improved energy efficiency performance of fenestration

Specification(s):

Existing weather-stripping and sash sealant will be removed

Surface where the sill meets the sash will be cleaned

Seal between the fixed components of the window (e.g., jambs, sill) will be continuous and complete while maintaining the operability of the window

Continuous and complete weather-stripping will be installed on the bottom of the lower sash where it makes contact with the sill and at the top of the upper sash where it makes contact with the upper part of the window frame

Objective(s):

Form a complete seal from the outer edge of the sash to the jamb

Maintain operability of the window

3.1201.1c - Sash locks

Desired Outcome:

Windows operable and weather tight; improved energy efficiency performance of fenestration

Specification(s):

Locks will be installed so that the rails of the upper and lower sashes are flush and in full contact

No gaps will be visible between the two sashes

Locks will be installed to achieve compression of the two sashes

Objective(s):

Form a secure connection between the two sashes

3.1201.1d - Replacement sills

Desired Outcome:

Windows operable and weather tight; improved energy efficiency performance of fenestration

Specification(s):

Beveled sill will be flush with interior wall and sloped to the exterior

Seams will be continuously and completely sealed with sealant to the jambs and to the frame

Sill will be water-sealed and primed

Objective(s):

Form a complete seal from the bottom of the lower sash to the sill

Maintain operability of the window

Allow for drainage to the exterior

Before After
Rot in and under a window sill is often a sign of a bigger problem Once repaired, this window is less leaky and better supported

Tools:

  1. Saw
  2. Drill
  3. Pry bar
  4. Sander
  5. Caulk gun

Materials:

  1. Lumber or metal sill
  2. Caulk
  3. Fasteners
  4. Flashing
Remove sill to determine full extent of rot and necessary repairs Once rotted materials are cut away, determine sizing of new materials
Cut new materials flush to surrounding surfaces and pitch toward exterior For exterior repairs, replace flashing
Set new sill, then replace and prime trim
3.1201.1e - Sash replacement

Desired Outcome:

Windows operable and weather tight; improved energy efficiency performance of fenestration

Specification(s):

Lower sash will have the same bevel on the bottom rail as the sill

Sash will be water-sealed and primed

Objective(s):

Ensure sash remains in a fixed position when open or partially open

Maintain operability of the window

Form a complete seal from the bottom of the lower sash to the sill

3.1201.1f - Adjust stops

Desired Outcome:

Windows operable and weather tight; improved energy efficiency performance of fenestration

Specification(s):

Stops will be adjusted to eliminate visible gaps between the stops and the jamb while maintaining operability of the window

Objective(s):

Form a complete seal between the jamb, sash, and stop

Maintain operability of the window

3.1201.1g - Replace stops

Desired Outcome:

Windows operable and weather tight; improved energy efficiency performance of fenestration

Specification(s):

Stops will be installed to keep the window securely in place

Stops will be adjusted to eliminate visible gaps between the stops and the jamb while maintaining operability of the window

Objective(s):

Form a complete seal between the jamb, sash, and stop

Maintain operability of the window

3.1201.2 Single-Unit Window and Fixed Frame with Wood Sash

3.1201.2a - Lead paint assessment

Desired Outcome:

Windows operable and weather tight; improved energy efficiency performance of fenestration

Specification(s):

Presence of lead-based paint in pre-1978 homes will be assumed unless testing confirms otherwise

EPA's RRP Program rule (40 CFR Part 745) in pre-1978 homes and proposed changes to this rule (Federal register/Vol. 75, No. 87/May 6, 2010) will be complied with, to be superseded by any subsequent final rulemaking or any more stringent state or federal standards

Objective(s):

Protect worker and occupant from potential lead hazards

Best Practice
In homes built before 1978, test paint before beginning renovation

Tools:

  1. Note: Mask must be worn during testing
  2. LeadCheck test kit
  3. Utility knife
  4. Camera

EPA RRP certification required to conduct Lead Paint Assessment.

See 2.0100.1p - Lead paint assessment for steps and photos.

3.1201.2b - Operable windows

Desired Outcome:

Windows operable and weather tight; improved energy efficiency performance of fenestration

Specification(s):

All egress windows will be operable as required by local codes

Objective(s):

Maintain operability of egress windows

3.1201.2c - Air infiltration

Desired Outcome:

Windows operable and weather tight; improved energy efficiency performance of fenestration

Specification(s):

Details that reduce air infiltration will be repaired, replaced, sealed, or installed (e.g., new latch for meeting rail connection, pulley seals, rope caulking for other cracks, interior storm windows)

State Energy Conservation Code or local code requirements for air leakage should be met (whichever is more stringent)

Objective(s):

Reduce air infiltration

3.1201.2d - Water infiltration

Desired Outcome:

Windows operable and weather tight; improved energy efficiency performance of fenestration

Specification(s):

Details that reduce water infiltration will be repaired, replaced, or installed (e.g., replace missing glazing compound on sash, exterior caulking, exterior storm windows)

Objective(s):

Reduce water infiltration

3.1201.2e - Occupant education and maintenance

Desired Outcome:

Windows operable and weather tight; improved energy efficiency performance of fenestration

Specification(s):

Occupants will be notified of changes or repairs made and will be educated on how to operate and maintain window

Objective(s):

Ensure long-term weather tightness

3.1201.3 Exterior Doors

3.1201.3a - Lead paint assessment

Desired Outcome:

Doors operable and weather tight

Specification(s):

Presence of lead-based paint in pre-1978 homes will be assumed unless testing confirms otherwise

EPA's RRP Program rule (40 CFR Part 745) in pre-1978 homes and proposed changes to this rule (Federal register/Vol. 75, No. 87/ May 6, 2010) will be complied with, to be superseded by any subsequent final rulemaking or any more stringent state or federal standards

Objective(s):

Protect worker and occupant from potential lead hazards

Best Practice
In homes built before 1978, test paint before beginning renovation

Tools:

  1. Note: Mask must be worn during testing
  2. LeadCheck test kit
  3. Utility knife
  4. Camera

EPA RRP certification required to conduct Lead Paint Assessment.

See 2.0100.1p - Lead paint assessment for steps and photos.

3.1201.3b - Door operation and fit

Desired Outcome:

Doors operable and weather tight

Specification(s):

Door will be adjusted to properly fit the jamb and allow for ease of operation (e.g., hinge replacement, re-plane door, door strike adjustment)

Objective(s):

Ensure proper operation of the door

Before After
Daylight visible around door can indicate it does not hang true and leaks With proper adjustment, doors should hang true and minimize leakage

Tools:

  1. Screwdriver
  2. Planer

Materials:

  1. Shims
1 2
After examining how door hangs, remove door from hinges Adjust hinge plates to bring door back into true
3 4
Adjust strike plate to allow for secure and smooth operation Rehang door to verify adjustments worked and door operates smoothly
3.1201.3c - Air infiltration

Desired Outcome:

Doors operable and weather tight

Specification(s):

Details that reduce air infiltration will be repaired, replaced, sealed, or installed in accordance with State Energy Conservation Code or local code-whichever is more stringent (e.g., weather-stripping, door bottoms, trim replacement with foam)

Objective(s):

Reduce air infiltration

Before After
Daylight visible around an exterior door indicates air infiltration Weather-stripping and a door bottom minimize air infiltration around doors

Tools:

  1. Screwdriver
  2. Saw
  3. Utility knife
  4. Caulk gun
  5. Drill
  6. Tape measure

Materials:

  1. Weather-stripping (Q-lan)
  2. Door bottom
  3. Fasteners
  4. Caulk
1 2
Remove leaky door in order to affix door bottom Measure and trim door, if necessary, to allow for door bottom
3 4
Trimming to allow for door bottom Cut door bottom to width of door
5 6
Ensure door bottom fits snugly around door and fasten into place Measure doorway for weather-stripping
7 8
Notch upper ends of side weather-stripping to allow for top piece Weather-stripping should fit snugly into rabbit and against other pieces
9
Rehang door and verify fit, operation, and lack of air infiltration
3.1201.3d - Water infiltration

Desired Outcome:

Doors operable and weather tight

Specification(s):

Details that reduce water infiltration will be repaired, replaced, sealed, or installed (e.g., adjust threshold, caulk jamb to threshold, caulk trim, flashing)

Objective(s):

Reduce water infiltration

Before After
Daylight visible under exterior doors indicate water can leak in By adjusting the threshold and sealing along it, water should be kept out

Tools:

  1. Caulk gun
  2. Screwdriver
  3. Pry bar

Materials:

  1. Caulk sealant
1 2
Adjust threshold to minimize gap and keep water out Caulk along threshold from inside and outside to prevent water infiltration
3.1201.3e - Occupant education and maintenance

Desired Outcome:

Doors operable and weather tight

Specification(s):

Occupants will be notified of changes or repairs made and will be educated on how to operate and maintain weather-stripping and caulk around door and trim

Objective(s):

Ensure long-term weather tightness

3.1201.4 Pocket Door

3.1201.4a - Backing and infill

Desired Outcome:

Pocket door sealed top and back to prevent leakage

Specification(s):

Backing or infill will be provided as needed to meet the specific characteristics of the selected material and the characteristics of the hole

The infill will not bend, sag, or move once installed

Objective(s):

Minimize hole size to ensure successful use of sealant

Ensure closure is permanent and supports any load (e.g., wind, insulation)

Ensure sealant does not fall out

3.1201.4b - Sealant selection

Desired Outcome:

Pocket door sealed top and back to prevent leakage

Specification(s):

Sealants will be compatible with their intended surfaces

Sealants will allow for differential expansion and contraction between dissimilar materials

Sealants will be continuous and meet fire barrier specifications, according to authority having jurisdiction

Sealant will be used in accordance with OSHA/manufacturer safety protocol for worker and occupant safety

Manufacturer MSDS sheet will be followed for worker safety

Objective(s):

Select permanent sealant

Ensure sealant meets or exceeds the performance characteristics of the surrounding materials

3.1202 Repairing/Replacing Cracked and Broken Glass

3.1202.1 Fixed Frame with Wood Sash - Older House

3.1202.1a - Lead paint assessment

Desired Outcome:

Glass complete and intact; improved energy efficiency performance of fenestration

Specification(s):

Presence of lead-based paint in pre-1978 homes will be assumed unless testing confirms otherwise

EPA's RRP Program rule (40 CFR Part 745) in pre-1978 homes and proposed changes to this rule (Federal register/Vol. 75, No. 87/ May 6, 2010) will be complied with, to be superseded by any subsequent final rulemaking or any more stringent state or federal standards

Objective(s):

Protect worker and occupant from potential lead hazards

Best Practice
In homes built before 1978, test paint before beginning renovation

Tools:

  1. Note: Mask must be worn during testing
  2. LeadCheck test kit
  3. Utility knife
  4. Camera

EPA RRP certification required to conduct Lead Paint Assessment.

See 2.0100.1p - Lead paint assessment for steps and photos.

3.1202.1b - Broken glass removal

Desired Outcome:

Glass complete and intact; improved energy efficiency performance of fenestration

Specification(s):

Putty and push points will be removed

Broken or cracked glass will be removed

Objective(s):

Safely remove old glass

Before In Progress
Broken glass with failed repairs needs to be replaced Large pieces of glass have been removed but sash still needs preparation

Tools:

  1. Putty knife
  2. Chisel
  3. Utility knife
  4. Shop vacuum
  5. Tape measure

Materials:

  1. Tape
1 2
Always wear heavy work gloves when working with glass Cut through caulk bead and glazing to ease removal
3 4
With points and glass removed, measure opening for replacement pane Remove old putty and glazing to expose metal points holding glass in place
5
Cut replacement glass 1/8" smaller than measured opening
3.1202.1c - Sash preparation

Desired Outcome:

Glass complete and intact; improved energy efficiency performance of fenestration

Specification(s):

Opening will be cleaned

Objective(s):

Prepare opening for new glass

Before In Progress
Remove all debris from sash either by sand paper, knife, or chisel Mount new glass onto a clean surface

Tools:

  1. Chisel
  2. Utility knife

Materials:

  1. Sand paper
  2. Cleaning solution
  3. Rags
1 2
Debris in the sash can cause new glass to seal improperly Check closely to remove all pieces of broken glass and debris
3
With sash cleaned, glass will fit properly and glazing will seal
3.1202.1d - New glass installation

Desired Outcome:

Glass complete and intact; improved energy efficiency performance of fenestration

Specification(s):

Glass will be sized 1/8" to 3/16'' smaller than opening to allow for movement of frame

Safety glass will be installed in accordance with local codes

Push points will be provided on each side to secure glass in frame

Glazing compound will be added in accordance with manufacturer specifications

Objective(s):

Ensure glazing compound will adhere to sash

Install, seal, and secure new glass in place

Allow glazing compound to harden to ensure secure installation

Before After
With sash prepared, installation of new pane can begin Replacement glass should be securely fixed with points and glazing

Tools:

  1. Caulk gun
  2. Tape measure
  3. Paint brush

Materials:

  1. Primer
  2. Window glazing
  3. Push points
  4. Shims
  5. Replacement glass
  6. Tape
1 2
Always wear heavy work gloves when working with glass With broken glass removed, measure opening for replacement glass
3 4
Cut replacement glass 1/8" smaller than measured opening Use shims to center glass while installing push points
5 6
With push points in place, glaze to air seal new glass pane in sash Secure pane in place with tape to hold until glazing sets

3.1202.2 Single-Unit Window, Mounted on Rough Opening - Newer House

3.1202.2a - Lead paint assessment

Desired Outcome:

Glass complete and intact; improved energy efficiency performance of fenestration

Specification(s):

Presence of lead-based paint in pre-1978 homes will be assumed unless testing confirms otherwise

EPA's RRP Program rule (40 CFR Part 745) in pre-1978 homes and proposed changes to this rule (Federal register/Vol. 75, No. 87/May 6, 2010) will be complied with, to be superseded by any subsequent final rulemaking or any more stringent state or federal standards

Objective(s):

Protect worker and occupant from potential lead hazards

Best Practice
In homes built before 1978, test paint before beginning renovation

Tools:

  1. Note: Mask must be worn during testing
  2. LeadCheck test kit
  3. Utility knife
  4. Camera

EPA RRP certification required to conduct Lead Paint Assessment.

See 2.0100.1p - Lead paint assessment for steps and photos.

3.1202.2b - Broken glass removal

Desired Outcome:

Glass complete and intact; improved energy efficiency performance of fenestration

Specification(s):

Window stops and damaged glass will be removed

Objective(s):

Safely remove old glass

Before In Progress
Broken glass with failed repairs needs to be replaced After larger pieces are removed, the sash still needs preparation

Tools:

  1. Putty knife
  2. Chisel
  3. Utility knife
  4. Shop vaccuum
  5. Tape measure

Materials:

  1. Tape
1 2
Always wear heavy work gloves when working with glass Cut through caulk or glazing to simplify removal
3 4
Remove old putty and glazing from glass to expose pin nails holding glass With pins and glass removed, measure opening for replacement pane
5
Cut replacement glass 1/8" smaller than measured opening
3.1202.2c - Opening preparation

Desired Outcome:

Glass complete and intact; improved energy efficiency performance of fenestration

Specification(s):

Opening will be cleaned

Glazing tape will be removed or replaced

Objective(s):

Prepare opening for new glass

Before In Progress
Remove all debris, glazing tape, and glass from sash Sash surface must be clean before mounting new glass

Tools:

  1. Chisel
  2. Utility knife

Materials:

  1. Cleaning solution
  2. Rags
1 2
Debris in the sash can cause new glass to seal improperly Check closely to remove and collect all broken glass and debris
3
With sash cleaned, glass will fit properly and glazing will seal
3.1202.2d - New glass installation

Desired Outcome:

Glass complete and intact; improved energy efficiency performance of fenestration

Specification(s):

Replacement glass will be sized to original width, height, and depth

Stops will be replaced or installed

Wood stops will be sealed to glass with appropriate sealant

Glass will be selected with comparable tint and coating (color and look)

Tempered glass will be installed as required by local codes

Glazing compound will be added in accordance with manufacturer specifications

Objective(s):

Install, seal, and secure new glass in place

Allow glazing compound to harden to ensure secure installation

Before After
With sash prepared, new pane installation can begin Replaced glass should be held in place while glazing sets

Tools:

  1. Caulk gun
  2. Tape measure
  3. Light-duty hammer

Materials:

  1. Trim
1 2
Always wear heavy work gloves when working with glass With broken glass removed, measure rough opening for replacement glass size
3 4
Cut replacement glass 1/8" smaller than measured opening With sash prepared, shim glass to center in opening and reinstall stops
5
Apply window glazing to air seal new pane

3.1203 Replacement

3.1203.1 Replacement Window in Existing Window Frame

3.1203.1a - Lead paint assessment

Desired Outcome:

Replacement window provides weather tight fit; improved energy efficiency performance of fenestration

Specification(s):

Presence of lead-based paint in pre-1978 homes will be assumed unless testing confirms otherwise

EPA's RRP Program rule (40 CFR Part 745) in pre-1978 homes and proposed changes to this rule (Federal register/Vol. 75, No. 87/ May 6, 2010) will be complied with, to be superseded by any subsequent final rulemaking or any more stringent state or federal standards

Objective(s):

Protect worker and occupant from potential lead hazards

Best Practice
In homes built before 1978, test paint before beginning renovation

Tools:

  1. Note: Mask must be worn during testing
  2. LeadCheck test kit
  3. Utility knife
  4. Camera

EPA RRP certification required to conduct Lead Paint Assessment.

See 2.0100.1p - Lead paint assessment for steps and photos.

3.1203.1b - Opening preparation for Replacement Window in Existing Window Frame

Desired Outcome:

Replacement window provides weather tight fit; improved energy efficiency performance of fenestration

Specification(s):

Interior stops, sashes, parting strips, and pulleys will be removed

Opening will be cleaned

Objective(s):

Provide a clean opening for replacement window unit

3.1203.1c - Replacement Window Installation

Desired Outcome:

Replacement window provides weather tight fit; improved energy efficiency performance of fenestration

Specification(s):

Replacement window will be installed in accordance with manufacturer specifications, ensuring that the exterior stops are caulked

Objective(s):

Ensure replacement window operates properly

Ensure replacement window has a weather tight fit

3.1203.1d - Safety

Desired Outcome:

Replacement window provides weather tight fit; improved energy efficiency performance of fenestration

Specification(s):

Egress windows and safety glass will be installed in accordance with local codes

Objective(s):

Meet all codes when replacing windows

3.1203.1e - Occupant education and maintenance

Desired Outcome:

Replacement window provides weather tight fit; improved energy efficiency performance of fenestration

Specification(s):

Occupants will be notified of changes or repairs made and will be educated on how to operate and maintain window

Objective(s):

Ensure long-term weather tightness

3.1203.2 Single-Unit Window, Mounted on Rough Opening-Newer House

3.1203.2a - Lead paint assessment

Desired Outcome:

Replacement window provides weather tight fit; improved energy efficiency performance of fenestration

Specification(s):

Presence of lead-based paint in pre-1978 homes will be assumed unless testing confirms otherwise

EPA's RRP Program rule (40 CFR Part 745) in pre-1978 homes and proposed changes to this rule (Federal register/Vol. 75, No. 87/May 6, 2010) will be complied with, to be superseded by any subsequent final rulemaking or any more stringent state or federal standards

Objective(s):

Protect worker and occupant from potential lead hazards

Best Practice
In homes built before 1978, test paint before beginning renovation

Tools:

  1. Note: Mask must be worn during testing
  2. LeadCheck test kit
  3. Utility knife
  4. Camera

EPA RRP certification required to conduct Lead Paint Assessment.

See 2.0100.1p - Lead paint assessment for steps and photos.

3.1203.2b - Opening preparation

Desired Outcome:

Replacement window provides weather tight fit; improved energy efficiency performance of fenestration

Specification(s):

Replacement window will be laid out with trim

Exterior trim will be removed or exterior siding will be cut back to fit new window with trim

Existing window will be removed

Window opening will be flashed in accordance with accepted industry standards

Objective(s):

Provide a clean and properly flashed opening for replacement window unit

Before In Progress
Single pane window in newer home Window is removed to allow for replacement with double pane unit

Tools:

  1. Pry bar
  2. Utility knife
  3. Drill

Materials:

  1. Window and door flashing
1 2
Single pane window needs to be replaced with double pane Cut through caulk at stops to break seal
3 4
Remove stops while attempting to keep damage to rough opening to minimum Remove interior trim
5 6
Remove exterior trim Remove exterior fasteners to free window
7 8
Remove window from rough opening Clean rough opening to remove old caulk and debris
9
Install flashing along sides and bottom of rough opening
3.1203.2c - Replacement unit preparation

Desired Outcome:

Replacement window provides weather tight fit; improved energy efficiency performance of fenestration

Specification(s):

Mounting detail will be determined based on depth of window and location of window liner

Objective(s):

Allow for good fit and finish of replacement window

Before In Progress
Single pane window is being removed Double-pane unit replaces previous single-pane one

Tools:

  1. Tape measure
  2. Utility knife
1 2
Measure rough opening depth to determine best method of installation Clean old sealant off exterior surface to allow for flange installation
3
Install unit following appropriate detail for rough opening and unit depth
3.1203.2d - Replacement Window Installation

Desired Outcome:

Replacement window provides weather tight fit; improved energy efficiency performance of fenestration

Specification(s):

Replacement windows will be installed in accordance with manufacturer specifications and will be integrated with flashing

Gaps between the new window and existing frame will be sealed with low-expanding foam

Objective(s):

Ensure replacement window operates properly

Ensure replacement window is weather tight

Before After
Single-pane window is being removed to install double-pane unit Double-pane unit installed with trim in place

Tools:

  1. Utility knife
  2. Spray foam gun
  3. Drill
  4. Hammer
  5. Saw

Materials:

  1. Fasteners
  2. Flashing
  3. Low-expansion spray foam
  4. Backer rod
  5. Primed trim
1 2
Install flashing to manufacturer specs and industry standards Flanges have been folded out to allow for easy installation
3 4
Fasten window flange securely around exterior of entire window With window secured in place, check for proper function
5 6
Check that sash locks align properly, indicating window is plumb Fill interior gap with compressible foam or appropriate sealant
7 8
Prime and replace interior trim and, if needed, sill Replace exterior trim and patch exterior siding or finish as needed
3.1203.2e - Safety

Desired Outcome:

Replacement window provides weather tight fit; improved energy efficiency performance of fenestration

Specification(s):

Egress windows and safety glass will be installed in accordance with local codes

Objective(s):

Meet all codes when replacing windows

3.1203.2f - Occupant education and maintenance

Desired Outcome:

Replacement window provides weather tight fit; improved energy efficiency performance of fenestration

Specification(s):

Occupant will be notified of changes or repairs made and will be educated on how to operate and maintain window

Objective(s):

Ensure long-term weather tightness

3.14 Basements and Crawl Spaces

3.1401 Basements Connected to Crawl Spaces

3.1401.1 Basements Connected to Crawl Spaces - Sealing and Insulating

3.1401.1a - Conditioned basements with vented crawl spaces

Desired Outcome:

Crawl spaces and basements separated using appropriate methods that define spaces and allow for treatment in accordance with specifications

Specification(s):

Crawl space will be separated from the conditioned basement with a continuous air barrier, ground moisture barrier, and thermal boundary

Objective(s):

Create separation and define spaces

Enable treatment of crawl spaces and basements by referenced specifications

Increase house durability and energy efficiency

3.1401.1b - Conditioned basements with closed crawl spaces

Desired Outcome:

Crawl spaces and basements separated using appropriate methods that define spaces and allow for treatment in accordance with specifications

Specification(s):

Crawl space will be separated from the conditioned basement with a continuous air barrier and ground moisture barrier

Objective(s):

Create separation and define spaces

Enable treatment of crawl spaces and basements by referenced specifications

Increase house durability and energy efficiency

3.1401.1c - Unconditioned basements with vented crawl spaces

Desired Outcome:

Crawl spaces and basements separated using appropriate methods that define spaces and allow for treatment in accordance with specifications

Specification(s):

Vented crawl space will be separated from the unconditioned basement with a continuous air barrier and ground moisture barrier

Objective(s):

Create separation and define spaces

Enable treatment of crawl spaces and basements by referenced specifications

Increase house durability and energy efficiency

3.1401.1d - Unconditioned basements with closed crawl spaces

Desired Outcome:

Crawl spaces and basements separated using appropriate methods that define spaces and allow for treatment in accordance with specifications

Specification(s):

Unconditioned basement will be treated as an extension of the closed crawl space

Objective(s):

Create separation and define spaces

Enable treatment of crawl spaces and basements by referenced specifications

Increase house durability and energy efficiency

3.1402 Crawl Spaces

3.1402.1 Crawl Spaces - Sealing Floor Penetrations

3.1402.1a - Backing and infill

Desired Outcome:

Air leakage prevented and indoor air quality protected

Specification(s):

Backing or infill will be provided as needed to meet the specific characteristics of the selected sealant and the characteristics of the penetration

The backing or infill will not bend, sag, or move once installed

Objective(s):

Ensure resulting closure is permanent and supports any load (e.g., insulation)